Eastern Grey Kangaroo Hunting

Ado

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Hi All,

I have been population controlling some roo's in Victoria (with a permit) using my 30-06, but it seems overkill.

What does everyone think is a suitable caliber - 243win, 223 or something else?

These are big roo's with average shots at 100m.

Any suggestions are welcome.

Ado
 
22.250 with barnes varmit grenades
if you are only whacking em at 100 metres aim for the neck up , specialy if you want the back end for meat .
they aren't called grenades for nothing......
or any soft projectile 55 grn
 
22.250 with barnes varmit grenades
if you are only whacking em at 100 metres aim for the neck up , specialy if you want the back end for meat .
they aren't called grenades for nothing......
or any soft projectile 55 grn

Thanks - will see how they go...
 
Report back on your hunt..... Sounds awesome!
 
I had some kangaroo meat once, quite delicious!
 
Ado if one were to travel to Australia to hunt say one of your fine buffalo, could one also hunt some roo's? I might could talk my wife into going with me on a hunt down under.
 
X 2 on the 22-250. All depends on ammo cost really. If you can reload and have a lot to cull then whatever calibre is handy and accurate.
cAustin, kangaroos though more than plentiful are protected as are all Australian native animals. Can't hunt them unless under strict issued permits usually only issued to pro-shooters and some to landholders. Sad waste of game in most cases as it is either pet food or not allowed to be taken, must be left to rot. Currently the Fishing and Shooting party are trying to change that so they can be hunted and utilised by recreational hunters. Hopefully this will be passed and the resource can be better utilised.
 
Hi Ado,

I do a bit of roo culling and only use a 223 with 55gr soft points. Some of the big buck roo's do take a few shots to put down at times. If you are shooting a lot of big buck roo's I would lean towards a .243.

Cheers,
JWB300
 
Hi All,

I have been population controlling some roo's in Victoria (with a permit) using my 30-06, but it seems overkill.

What does everyone think is a suitable caliber - 243win, 223 or something else?

These are big roo's with average shots at 100m.

Any suggestions are welcome.

Ado
I used a .223 and had good luck with good shots. I think .243 would be ideal. I made one fantastic shot on a small one. It was really heading away through some woods and there was real tall grass so I could only see him on the hop. I got a look between two very large trees and timed it on the hop. Took the shot and pop! Luckily because I had a rowdy audience that would not have let me live it down. Those big bucks are Kinda scary looking with those dagger like claws. Oh yea and hey smell too. Roos do terrible damage to farms and must be controlled. I am the man for the job!
Regards,
Philip
 
X 2 on the 22-250. All depends on ammo cost really. If you can reload and have a lot to cull then whatever calibre is handy and accurate.
cAustin, kangaroos though more than plentiful are protected as are all Australian native animals. Can't hunt them unless under strict issued permits usually only issued to pro-shooters and some to landholders. Sad waste of game in most cases as it is either pet food or not allowed to be taken, must be left to rot. Currently the Fishing and Shooting party are trying to change that so they can be hunted and utilised by recreational hunters. Hopefully this will be passed and the resource can be better utilised.
What is the latest on this?
 
What is body weight of these animals?
 
Hi All,

I have been population controlling some roo's in Victoria (with a permit) using my 30-06, but it seems overkill.

What does everyone think is a suitable caliber - 243win, 223 or something else?

These are big roo's with average shots at 100m.

Any suggestions are welcome.

Ado
I've helped a few Roo cullers in the North west and Northern Tablelands of NSW. A .243W is too big in flash & noise. Here your required to use 'humane' head shots. The most effective was a downloaded 22-250 and a .22PPC, For really big fellas over 25 kg I'd use a 6mm PPC or possibly a Grendel if I didnt have to box them. If you have to put them in the box you don't want them crawling away or scareing them off in the next paddock.
 
Last edited:
I've helped a few Roo cullers in the North west and Northern Tablelands of NSW. A .243W is too big in flash & noise. Here your required to use 'humane' head shots. The most effective was a downloaded 22-250 and a .22PPC, For really big fellas over 25 kg I'd use a 6mm PPC or possibly a Grendel if I didnt have to box them. If you have to put them in the box you don't want them crawling away or scareing them off in the next paddock.
@Code4
The old 222 rem or 223 loaded with Sierra 50 or 55 grain roo load projectiles is ideal for roos for the bigger ones you could step up to a 22/250.
If'n you think 25 kilos are big roos you need to go where I used to hunt them. 60 to 100 kg was regarded as big with 50kg average.
As you have to head shoot them any of the 22 cal centre fires is more than adequate. If you hunt under light even a 22 lr in the back of the head up to 50 yards is ample.
Bob
 
The .223 is certainly the pick for head shots Bob. We just found the slightly heavy projjies and/or higher velocities helped for the long shots with wind. These blokes were shooting for the box and took it very seriously. I've seen a couple of 100kg Greys on Singleton Army range where they weren't hunted, but only seen anything heavier out west with the Reds. Cheers.
 
Back in the day it was nothing to shoot 100 to 150 'roo's a night when culling for the PP board.
223 was the choice, even used the old Norinco's for throw away cases, or a 220 Swift out to the 500m mark.

Roger
 
I know a few Pro shooters, I have been out many nights with Pro Shooters, I have worked in the PP Board and the National Parks.
I know what the regulations, I have culled Roos on permit for landholders, Oh, I've recently completed the harvesters course. A pre requisite for a Pro licence.
I have been an authorised shooter for 3 authorities.
The majority of Pro shooters use a .223 for harvesting. Some may have a .22-250 as the backup rifle or use it on a windy night.

Bob would be talking of Live Weight,

Ray is the only other person talking sense.

Harvesters are. Talking on the hook on scales not estimates Essentially, a good night is taking 35-40 roos to the ton average weight.

Disclaimer, average season, average night, across the board 4 nights a week for the 40 something weeks you might do ok pending wet weather, breakdown, maintenance unless you are employed and shoot part time.

Another Aussie member might chime in yet.
 
I know a few Pro shooters, I have been out many nights with Pro Shooters, I have worked in the PP Board and the National Parks.
I know what the regulations, I have culled Roos on permit for landholders, Oh, I've recently completed the harvesters course. A pre requisite for a Pro licence.
I have been an authorised shooter for 3 authorities.
The majority of Pro shooters use a .223 for harvesting. Some may have a .22-250 as the backup rifle or use it on a windy night.

Bob would be talking of Live Weight,

Ray is the only other person talking sense.

Harvesters are. Talking on the hook on scales not estimates Essentially, a good night is taking 35-40 roos to the ton average weight.

Disclaimer, average season, average night, across the board 4 nights a week for the 40 something weeks you might do ok pending wet weather, breakdown, maintenance unless you are employed and shoot part time.

Another Aussie member might chime in yet.

I’ve shot with professional shooters- leave at 4:30 in the late afternoon and get back around 7 in the morning.
I’ve shot hundreds with the pro shooters and I would shoot long distances so as not to scare the other roos.
Certainly hard work - skinning and loading and uploading.
Certainly made me appreciate how hard a pro shooter had to work.
In my state : head shots or if not completely successful then a heart shot.
I found I could shoot a lot farther out with the 22/250 with more accuracy on breezy nights.
 
Yes, it's hard work but a part of life and our passion for the bush.

As Bob will agree the fast .22 centerfires etc will take them.

The dinosaurs among us used .222, superseded by the .223 and sometimes hot .22s like the .30-25 also Bob's era.

The .220 swift, .204 Ruger .243 Myra (.223 case) they have as ll been done and I have seen a pro trial a .221 fireball, just because he likes guns.

Back to the OP, .30-06 is overkill, I've used .308 and 7mm-08 when I've needed to to because it's what I had.

Get a .23-250 or just a .223 . A Howa .223 will do and the OSA ammo is cheap and good.
 

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