CAMEROON: FARO EAST NORTH CAMEROON Northwest Buffalo Hunt

Andrew62

AH fanatic
Joined
Oct 12, 2010
Messages
970
Reaction score
2,233
Media
17
Hunting reports
Africa
8
Member of
SCI
Hunted
Cameroon, Zimbabwe, South Africa, Namibia.
Faro East Northwest Buffalo Hunt

It has been a dream of mine for 25+ years to hunt a northwest buffalo, which as I understand, can now only be hunted in Cameroon. I honestly had pretty much given up on this becoming a reality until one day last fall I noticed a northwest buffalo hunt being offered right here on Africahunting.

The owner of @FARO EAST NORTH CAMEROON is Patrick Dahlan, my initial communications were with his son, Romain. Both Patrick and Romain are successful business owners in other industries, so they know full well what is expected of them. After just 2 or 3 emails back and forth with Romain, I put down my deposit and started the planning of my hunt.

Having hunted 3 previous times in Cameroon, 2 times for bongo, one for Lord Derby eland, I had a good idea of what to expect. This part of the world can be quite difficult to get to, and to navigate all that is needed to be able to hunt Cameroon, the Dahlan’s have a man in Paris, Mathias, who took care of my visa details, flights in Cameroon, my motel stays in Douala as well as the meet-n-greet service needed in Douala. This service proved to be very efficient and helpful.

My trip started by driving to Dulles airport from my home in western Maryland. I flew from Dulles to Brussels on United Airlines, then from Brussels to Douala on Brussels airlines. Upon arrival in Douala I was met by a representative hired by Mathias. This man navigated me through the aspects of getting through the Douala airport traveling with a gun. He then took me to the La Falaise hotel, which was only a 10 minute drive from the airport. My room was exceedingly nice, the buffet for dinner and breakfast were very nice as well. After a restful night of sleep I was picked up, taken to the airport, then I flew from Douala to Yaounde then on to Ngaoundere. I was picked up in Ngaoundere by an employee of Faro East, a quick security check was completed there, then off to camp we went. Camp is about a 2 hour drive from the airport. (Note to self, never will I ever fly Brussels Airlines into, or out of, Cameroon when traveling with a gun, NEVER)

Upon arrival in camp I was met by Romain and Patrick. Patrick took me to my room, showed me around, and made sure to tell me if I needed anything to please tell him. One thing of note, ’if you have not yet hunted Cameroon, camps in this part of the world are different than those found in South Africa, but this camp, compared to the previous three camps I stayed in while hunting in Cameroon, was far superior.

After settling in I was taken to the range to be sure my rifle was still shooting straight, one shot confirmed that, back to camp we went. After resting for a bit I met the Dahlan’s and the other hunter, and his group at the dining area for a drink and to discuss the upcoming hunt. Evening meals are served around 8pm, after dinner we all went and watched the ‘bush TV’.

Day 1, up at 5:30am, leave camp at 6am. Since my focus was on buffalo, we headed to the south area of their concession, which as I understand it, may have more buffalo, but believe me, they have buffalo. And not just buffalo, but really good buffalo. During the morning hunt we came upon buffalo 4 different times, we also saw several other game species.

The afternoon hunt started at 3:30pm, not far out of camp we came across a really nice cob ram. After a short stalk, I was able to connect on my cob. Since we were so close to camp we took the cob to the skinning shed and went back out to hunt. On 3 more occasions that first afternoon we came across buffalo. Actually, I was set up on the sticks on one particular bull, but given the distance, him quartering hard to the right, we elected to pass and wait for a better shooting situation.

Day 2, up at 5:30am, leave camp at 6am. Early this morning we bumped into buffalo 2 or 3 times, then around 8am we found very fresh buffalo tracks and spoor in the road. After inspection and debate between my guides and the trackers, it was decided there were in fact tracks of two large bulls, so off we went. Not more than 200-300 yards into our stalk we came upon these two buffalo bulls. They were peacefully just milling around, browsing, no idea we were there. No words can describe the excitement I was feeling knowing my 25+ year dream was standing broadside in front of me at 100 yards. While I was waiting for the sticks to go up, I heard my two PH’s speaking to each other. Wondering what could possibly be the problem I simply made a hand gesture asking what was up. What I was not noticing was just a few feet behind the bulls was a very thick vegetated area. Their fear was the buffalo would possibly run into this area, thus making an incredibly dangerous situation if we had to stalk into this area for a follow up shot. It’s amazing how quick ones excitement can turn to frustration and dissapointment, but I certainly had to agree with their logic. So now came the wait, will they continue on into this thick brush, or would I get lucky and they do a 180 and come back our way. After what seemed like forever, probably 15-20 minutes in reality, to my great delight, they both slowly turned and headed back towards us. Wanting them to get 75 to 100 yards from the thick area I had to stand there, set up on the sticks, and wait for my opportunity. So now my excitement was back like never before, then just like that, these two buffalo started to run, again I am thinking, ‘you have got to be kidding me!’ For reasons only luck will ever understand, when the buffalo pulled up even with us, at about 50 yards, they both stopped, my PH said ‘take the one on the right’, I said, ‘I can’t, it’s vitals are covered’, so now I am was back to thinking, ‘damnit’, that thought no sooner went through my mind than the PH says, ‘then take the one on the left’. I am not so sure the word ‘left’ actually had totally left his mouth before I squeezed the trigger and my buffalo was laying flat on its side. That 300 grain Hornady DGX flattened him straight out. Being super careful, we all now focused on the second buffalo, as there beggars can get a little mean, after a minute or so the second buffalo ran off, we walked over cautiously to my buffalo, decided to put an insurance shot in him, and my 25 year dream was realized!!

Days 3-5, up at 5:45, leave came around 6:15. These three days were spent mostly driving looking for western hartebeest and sing sing waterbuck. I can tell you, they have plenty of these two species to hunt, but do not think you are going to just go driving around and you see herds and herds of them, you will see them, then you most often will have to do a bit of stalking, and trust me, these two species are switched on, I cannot begin to tell you how often these things would just take off running for no reason.

Day 6, the last day of my hunt, up at 6:00, out of camp at 6:30. This day would get us back in the southern area of their concession, around 10:00am two waterbuck bulls jumped up from their resting spot not 30 yards from the road. We jumped off of the truck, after just a few minutes of stalking, one of the bulls stepped out from behind a bush, one shot from my 375H&H dropped him in his tracks. After the usual taking of pictures, the waterbuck was loaded up and back to camp we went for lunch and a rest.

As we headed back out for the afternoon hunt, around 3:30, I recall thanking God for such a wonderful experience, for being able to take three wonderful trophies, and for health to be able to be out to enjoy all of this beauty. Around 5:15 that afternoon, as I was just soaking in the beauty of this area of Cameroon, enjoying the final moments of my safari, all of a sudden the trackers standing behind us in the back of the pickup got very excited, my guide said they spotted a group of western hartebeest. The hartebeest were probably 100 yards off to our right, so we got off the back of the truck and immediately set up on the sticks. After being sure my guide and I were on the same animal, I shot, at the shot, the hartebeest took off sprinting, my second shot was probably 10’ in front of him, but the funniest/luckiest thing happened, this hartebeest was just a couple of steps from being in super thick vegetation and most likely gone forever, but for reasons only the hunting gods understand, he did a complete 180, ran just a few feet and stopped, in the confusion of hartebeest running in all directions, the guide got me back on my bull, and when he stepped out from behind a tree I shot and dropped him in his tracks. In the moment, it certainly was not funny to miss, but when it was over it had reminded me of one of those carnival games where you shoot at the ducks, you hit the target, and it does a 180. That’s how this hartebeest hunt went. Upon walking up to my hartebeest, I was amazed at the size of its bases and length of horn. I truly had taken a very nice western hartebeest.

Until pictures were taken, it was 6:15 and we were headed back to camp. What a glorious ride it was that night, warm breeze in my face, knowing I had taken all 4 species of animals I had come to hunt. God certainly could not have blessed me more than He did on this hunt.

I was most fortunate to see a serval cat one evening, then the next night, I saw a leopard not 10 steps from the vehicle as we passed by, then just 15 minutes later we sat and watched a civet cat at 5 yards. We saw many signs of elephant but did not see elephant. If only this area would allow lion and leopard hunting, they certainly have them there.

To wrap up my thoughts and to speak a little bit to other aspects of this particular hunt; if you ever desire to hunt northwest buffalo, Faro East is where you NEED to go, believe me, they have buffalo, quality buffalo. The hunting season in Cameroon is from around January 1st to mid April, something like that. Faro east has quality staff, quality PH’s, quality vehicles, more land to hunt than you could ever get to, for Cameroon, they have a very nice camp. In fact their wifi was good enough I could send and receive texts through WhatsApp. Each evening after coming back in from hunting I would shower, then head to the campfire area where we’d sit, tell lies, always remember, the first liar never stands a chance, lol, and new friendships were born.

I personally was not there to hunt Lord Derby Eland, but believe me, they have quality LDE. I saw a video of another guy who was in camp hunting LDE and one day he had 3 very nice LDE in one group approximately 60 yards from him.

Thank you Romain for selling me this hunt, thank you Patrick for all of the struggles it takes to run a successful hunting camp in Cameroon!!


thumbnail_IMG_7744.jpg
thumbnail_IMG_0491.jpg





thumbnail_FullSizeRender.jpg
thumbnail_IMG_7993.jpg
 
Last edited by a moderator:
Fantastic specimens! We have similar tastes in Buffalo.

Congrats!
 
excellent report and thanks for taking us along for the ride. Congrats on a great hunt with some great trophies.
 
That sounds like a fantastic safari. Congrats on your animals and thank you for sharing your story with us
 
Beautiful trophies. Sounds like a wonderful hunt. Congrats on a great hunt. So sounds like a story about not using Brussels air when transporting a firearm. Care to share it? Thanks
Bruce
 
Beautiful trophies. Sounds like a wonderful hunt. Congrats on a great hunt. So sounds like a story about not using Brussels air when transporting a firearm. Care to share it? Thanks
Bruce
Honestly Bruce, I have been to Africa many times, but this trip with Brussels Airlines was as infuriating and frustrating of an experience as I have ever had. In its simplest form, I thought I was going to miss my flight from Douala to the hunting camp, then I for real thought I would never make my flight out of Douala to head home. No one seemed to know their ass from a hole in the ground, I was bounced from this person to that person, taken into the basement of the airport, then back up to the ticket counter, on and on and on. Both times I was flying in and out of Douala the plane was loading when I was finally cleared to board. The meet-n-greet guy told me you have to fly into Douala on AirFrance. Oh, another thing, I boarded my original flight at Dulles airport, no issue whatsoever, but before I could board in Brussels I was pulled aside and had to pay 130 Euros for my rifle to be placed on the plane. The thing I learned was next time ask the outfitter if there is anything I needed to know, so I will accept responsibility for not asking that question. The other hunter in camp who was there for LDE was borrowing a gun, he sailed right through.

Lastly, I will be back with Tsala this September, I enjoyed getting to know you last May when we shared camp together! I have asked them to put out special minerals so I can have a shot at beating the massive sable you shot last year!!! lol
 
Congratulations on your buffalo. Do you know what unit you were hunting in?
 
Congratulations on your buffalo. Do you know what unit you were hunting in?
I thought I heard them say hunting area 5, but I am not 100% positive on that.
 
Faro East Northwest Buffalo Hunt

It has been a dream of mine for 25+ years to hunt a northwest buffalo, which as I understand, can now only be hunted in Cameroon. I honestly had pretty much given up on this becoming a reality until one day last fall I noticed a northwest buffalo hunt being offered right here on Africahunting.

The owner of Faro East is Patrick Dahlan, my initial communications were with his son, Romain. Both Patrick and Romain are successful business owners in other industries, so they know full well what is expected of them. After just 2 or 3 emails back and forth with Romain, I put down my deposit and started the planning of my hunt.

Having hunted 3 previous times in Cameroon, 2 times for bongo, one for Lord Derby eland, I had a good idea of what to expect. This part of the world can be quite difficult to get to, and to navigate all that is needed to be able to hunt Cameroon, the Dahlan’s have a man in Paris, Mathias, who took care of my visa details, flights in Cameroon, my motel stays in Douala as well as the meet-n-greet service needed in Douala. This service proved to be very efficient and helpful.

My trip started by driving to Dulles airport from my home in western Maryland. I flew from Dulles to Brussels on United Airlines, then from Brussels to Douala on Brussels airlines. Upon arrival in Douala I was met by a representative hired by Mathias. This man navigated me through the aspects of getting through the Douala airport traveling with a gun. He then took me to the La Falaise hotel, which was only a 10 minute drive from the airport. My room was exceedingly nice, the buffet for dinner and breakfast were very nice as well. After a restful night of sleep I was picked up, taken to the airport, then I flew from Douala to Yaounde then on to Ngaoundere. I was picked up in Ngaoundere by an employee of Faro East, a quick security check was completed there, then off to camp we went. Camp is about a 2 hour drive from the airport. (Note to self, never will I ever fly Brussels Airlines into, or out of, Cameroon when traveling with a gun, NEVER)

Upon arrival in camp I was met by Romain and Patrick. Patrick took me to my room, showed me around, and made sure to tell me if I needed anything to please tell him. One thing of note, ’if you have not yet hunted Cameroon, camps in this part of the world are different than those found in South Africa, but this camp, compared to the previous three camps I stayed in while hunting in Cameroon, was far superior.

After settling in I was taken to the range to be sure my rifle was still shooting straight, one shot confirmed that, back to camp we went. After resting for a bit I met the Dahlan’s and the other hunter, and his group at the dining area for a drink and to discuss the upcoming hunt. Evening meals are served around 8pm, after dinner we all went and watched the ‘bush TV’.

Day 1, up at 5:30am, leave camp at 6am. Since my focus was on buffalo, we headed to the south area of their concession, which as I understand it, may have more buffalo, but believe me, they have buffalo. And not just buffalo, but really good buffalo. During the morning hunt we came upon buffalo 4 different times, we also saw several other game species.

The afternoon hunt started at 3:30pm, not far out of camp we came across a really nice cob ram. After a short stalk, I was able to connect on my cob. Since we were so close to camp we took the cob to the skinning shed and went back out to hunt. On 3 more occasions that first afternoon we came across buffalo. Actually, I was set up on the sticks on one particular bull, but given the distance, him quartering hard to the right, we elected to pass and wait for a better shooting situation.

Day 2, up at 5:30am, leave camp at 6am. Early this morning we bumped into buffalo 2 or 3 times, then around 8am we found very fresh buffalo tracks and spoor in the road. After inspection and debate between my guides and the trackers, it was decided there were in fact tracks of two large bulls, so off we went. Not more than 200-300 yards into our stalk we came upon these two buffalo bulls. They were peacefully just milling around, browsing, no idea we were there. No words can describe the excitement I was feeling knowing my 25+ year dream was standing broadside in front of me at 100 yards. While I was waiting for the sticks to go up, I heard my two PH’s speaking to each other. Wondering what could possibly be the problem I simply made a hand gesture asking what was up. What I was not noticing was just a few feet behind the bulls was a very thick vegetated area. Their fear was the buffalo would possibly run into this area, thus making an incredibly dangerous situation if we had to stalk into this area for a follow up shot. It’s amazing how quick ones excitement can turn to frustration and dissapointment, but I certainly had to agree with their logic. So now came the wait, will they continue on into this thick brush, or would I get lucky and they do a 180 and come back our way. After what seemed like forever, probably 15-20 minutes in reality, to my great delight, they both slowly turned and headed back towards us. Wanting them to get 75 to 100 yards from the thick area I had to stand there, set up on the sticks, and wait for my opportunity. So now my excitement was back like never before, then just like that, these two buffalo started to run, again I am thinking, ‘you have got to be kidding me!’ For reasons only luck will ever understand, when the buffalo pulled up even with us, at about 50 yards, they both stopped, my PH said ‘take the one on the right’, I said, ‘I can’t, it’s vitals are covered’, so now I am was back to thinking, ‘damnit’, that thought no sooner went through my mind than the PH says, ‘then take the one on the left’. I am not so sure the word ‘left’ actually had totally left his mouth before I squeezed the trigger and my buffalo was laying flat on its side. That 300 grain Hornady DGX flattened him straight out. Being super careful, we all now focused on the second buffalo, as there beggars can get a little mean, after a minute or so the second buffalo ran off, we walked over cautiously to my buffalo, decided to put an insurance shot in him, and my 25 year dream was realized!!

Days 3-5, up at 5:45, leave came around 6:15. These three days were spent mostly driving looking for western hartebeest and sing sing waterbuck. I can tell you, they have plenty of these two species to hunt, but do not think you are going to just go driving around and you see herds and herds of them, you will see them, then you most often will have to do a bit of stalking, and trust me, these two species are switched on, I cannot begin to tell you how often these things would just take off running for no reason.

Day 6, the last day of my hunt, up at 6:00, out of camp at 6:30. This day would get us back in the southern area of their concession, around 10:00am two waterbuck bulls jumped up from their resting spot not 30 yards from the road. We jumped off of the truck, after just a few minutes of stalking, one of the bulls stepped out from behind a bush, one shot from my 375H&H dropped him in his tracks. After the usual taking of pictures, the waterbuck was loaded up and back to camp we went for lunch and a rest.

As we headed back out for the afternoon hunt, around 3:30, I recall thanking God for such a wonderful experience, for being able to take three wonderful trophies, and for health to be able to be out to enjoy all of this beauty. Around 5:15 that afternoon, as I was just soaking in the beauty of this area of Cameroon, enjoying the final moments of my safari, all of a sudden the trackers standing behind us in the back of the pickup got very excited, my guide said they spotted a group of western hartebeest. The hartebeest were probably 100 yards off to our right, so we got off the back of the truck and immediately set up on the sticks. After being sure my guide and I were on the same animal, I shot, at the shot, the hartebeest took off sprinting, my second shot was probably 10’ in front of him, but the funniest/luckiest thing happened, this hartebeest was just a couple of steps from being in super thick vegetation and most likely gone forever, but for reasons only the hunting gods understand, he did a complete 180, ran just a few feet and stopped, in the confusion of hartebeest running in all directions, the guide got me back on my bull, and when he stepped out from behind a tree I shot and dropped him in his tracks. In the moment, it certainly was not funny to miss, but when it was over it had reminded me of one of those carnival games where you shoot at the ducks, you hit the target, and it does a 180. That’s how this hartebeest hunt went. Upon walking up to my hartebeest, I was amazed at the size of its bases and length of horn. I truly had taken a very nice western hartebeest.

Until pictures were taken, it was 6:15 and we were headed back to camp. What a glorious ride it was that night, warm breeze in my face, knowing I had taken all 4 species of animals I had come to hunt. God certainly could not have blessed me more than He did on this hunt.

I was most fortunate to see a serval cat one evening, then the next night, I saw a leopard not 10 steps from the vehicle as we passed by, then just 15 minutes later we sat and watched a civet cat at 5 yards. We saw many signs of elephant but did not see elephant. If only this area would allow lion and leopard hunting, they certainly have them there.

To wrap up my thoughts and to speak a little bit to other aspects of this particular hunt; if you ever desire to hunt northwest buffalo, Faro East is where you NEED to go, believe me, they have buffalo, quality buffalo. The hunting season in Cameroon is from around January 1st to mid April, something like that. Faro east has quality staff, quality PH’s, quality vehicles, more land to hunt than you could ever get to, for Cameroon, they have a very nice camp. In fact their wifi was good enough I could send and receive texts through WhatsApp. Each evening after coming back in from hunting I would shower, then head to the campfire area where we’d sit, tell lies, always remember, the first liar never stands a chance, lol, and new friendships were born.

I personally was not there to hunt Lord Derby Eland, but believe me, they have quality LDE. I saw a video of another guy who was in camp hunting LDE and one day he had 3 very nice LDE in one group approximately 60 yards from him.

Thank you Romain for selling me this hunt, thank you Patrick for all of the struggles it takes to run a successful hunting camp in Cameroon!!


View attachment 525009View attachment 525010




View attachment 525011View attachment 525012
Congratulations on a great hunt, animals and report!!!
 
Northwestern Buffalo have split many years ago in the SCI record book and Rowland Ward. Now it's Western Savanna Buffalo and Central Savanna Buffalo. The Western Savanna you can still hunt them also in Senegal also. For the Central Savanna you can hunt them in CAR and in the future some limited quota will be available in Chad again.
 
Northwestern Buffalo have split many years ago in the SCI record book and Rowland Ward. Now it's Western Savanna Buffalo and Central Savanna Buffalo. The Western Savanna you can still hunt them also in Senegal also. For the Central Savanna you can hunt them in CAR and in the future some limited quota will be available in Chad again.
Thank you for the clarification. I hunted in the rain forest 2 times, are those buffalo called dwarf forest buffalo, or do they go by another name?
 
Great hunt, beautiful animals, congrats !
 
Lastly, I will be back with Tsala this September, I enjoyed getting to know you last May when we shared camp together! I have asked them to put out special minerals so I can have a shot at beating the massive sable you shot last year!!! lol
I hope you get a better one! They had a couple better there. I was very happy with the monster that I was able to get. Sounds like the airline was a real mess. Glad it all worked out for you. Good luck.
Bruce
 
Outstanding hunt!
 
Andrew,

Thank you very much for this great report ! It was a blast having you hunting with us for this great buffalo hunt ! We hope to see you again very soon !

Romain
 

Forum statistics

Threads
55,583
Messages
1,182,251
Members
96,935
Latest member
Randyrag
 

 

 

Latest posts

Latest profile posts

cwpayton wrote on Goat416's profile.
Goat416 welcome to the forum ,youve got some great pics and Im sure trophy's
ghay wrote on professor's profile.
Hello,
Would you consider selling just the Barnes 235's and 250g TTSX's?
Hunt27 wrote on Tra3's profile.
Spain, i booked through a consultant, i book almost everything through him now and he's done me right. his contact 724 986 7206 if interested and he will have more info to share,
I hunted elephant with Luke Samaris in 2005. It was my fourth safari and I tell you he is a fine gentleman the best. I got the opportunity to meet Patty Curtis, although never hunted with him but enjoyed our conversation around our tent in the Selous. Very sad for a tough guy to leave this world the way he did. Let’s pray the murderers are caught. I hope to see Luke in Nashville.
 
Top