Annealing 375 H&H Brass

schwerpunkt88

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Question- Do you guys anneal your 375 H&H brass or not? Does not seem like the brass takes a lot of "working" to size and load, so I'm not sure it makes sense.
 
Yup. All my brass is annealed before first firing and after every 3rd go-around.

From late December to early February I'm preparing 2,000+ pieces of brass across 6 calibers for a season's worth of firing. A whole lotta annealing is involved with that.

I guess whether it makes sense or not for a particular cartridge may be dependent on just how OCD and A-R the individual in question is.
 
Brass is supposed to get final annealing before shipping to market.

If you've ever gotten weird, large group patterns with previously established loads when the only change is using new brass, then anneal some of the new brass and watch those groups tighten right up.
 
Brass is supposed to get final annealing before shipping to market.

If you've ever gotten weird, large group patterns with previously established loads when the only change is using new brass, then anneal some of the new brass and watch those groups tighten right up.
Would greatly appreciate what equipment you use for annealing
 
There is all manner of equipment out there today for annealing. Me? I'm a Neanderthal.

I use the tried and true, simple-but-effective candle method.
 
Nope, have never annealed a piece of brass over 50 years of shooting. My mostly Rem with some Win .375 brass have been fired many times over the years, never had any issue with either or in any other caliber.
Pretty much all commercial brass is annealed at the factory.
 
Nope, have never annealed a piece of brass over 50 years of shooting. My mostly Rem with some Win .375 brass have been fired many times over the years, never had any issue with either or in any other caliber.
Pretty much all commercial brass is annealed at the factory.
I was wondering that about annealing? I read it here over and over again but I've never done it either. In fact, until recently, I never "cleaned" my brass with a tumbler before reloading. Just wiped it off, lubed it and ran it through the sizing die. Not pretty but no issues. Guess I'm a heathen? LOL
 
There is all manner of equipment out there today for annealing. Me? I'm a Neanderthal.

I use the tried and true, simple-but-effective candle method.
What's the procedure for that? Just heat up the case neck/shoulder with a regular candle? If so, I'm qualified to do that. LOL
 
I anneal "after" the first firing, and before I clean the brass to resize
What's the procedure for that? Just heat up the case neck/shoulder with a regular candle? If so, I'm qualified to do that. LOL
The candle causes too much soot... just use your standard soldering torch, start the flame, turn to low, set it on your shop bench or garage or table etc... set a pail of cold water below it... while wear thin cotton or leather gloves, hold the base of the casing and twirl it around in the flame from the shoulder to neck, when your fingers get warm, drop it in the bucket and do the next one... fast and easy... just don't get lax and forget the open flame and burn yourself, ask me why I am mentioning that! Lol.
 
What's the procedure for that? Just heat up the case neck/shoulder with a regular candle? If so, I'm qualified to do that. LOL
- Fire up your candle.
- Grab your brass halfway down its length with your thumb and index finger
- Angle the neck up to the shoulder of the brass slightly upward over the flame and begin turning the brass
- When holding the brass becomes annoyingly hot - you are done. Time to clean
- Figure holding no more than ~10 seconds. Bigger brass a skoosh longer, smaller brass less

Now if you want to evolve a tiny step from Neanderthal to Cro-Magnon, you can use one of those spiffy, tiny alcohol wick lamps with Isopropyl for $15 - $20 to do the annealing. That way there's no need to wipe the necks clean. I was sorely tempted at one time, but my essential cheapness prevailed.
 
Only started annealing after 20 years of reloading, COVID era.

I had 7x fired 450/400 Nitro brass, and none to buy. I followed the procedure from "Loading the British Double Rifle" 3rd edition, by Graeme Wright.

As a Research Chef, I followed time, temperature curves and Graeme's procedure.

Low temperature gas burner (7000 BTU at half strength).

Hold the case at the rim, rotating the neck for 10-20 seconds. When the rim is hot to the touch, remove from flame and let cool.

Done. It works.
 
- Fire up your candle.
- Grab your brass halfway down its length with your thumb and index finger
- Angle the neck up to the shoulder of the brass slightly upward over the flame and begin turning the brass
- When holding the brass becomes annoyingly hot - you are done. Time to clean
- Figure holding no more than ~10 seconds. Bigger brass a skoosh longer, smaller brass less

Now if you want to evolve a tiny step from Neanderthal to Cro-Magnon, you can use one of those spiffy, tiny alcohol wick lamps with Isopropyl for $15 - $20 to do the annealing. That way there's no need to wipe the necks clean. I was sorely tempted at one time, but my essential cheapness prevailed.
Maybe a “scented” candle? Ocean breeze, evergreen, pumpkin spice, etc.? LOL
 
Thanks. There is a lot of different information out there on annealing. One video I watched warned against dumping the heated brass into cold water as that actually hardens the metal. I've seen "let it cool" recommendations and dump it into cold water recommendations. What's everyone think?
 
Thanks. There is a lot of different information out there on annealing. One video I watched warned against dumping the heated brass into cold water as that actually hardens the metal. I've seen "let it cool" recommendations and dump it into cold water recommendations. What's everyone think?
Well, with this question I learned something new as I decided to research before answering. I have never water cooled brass after annealing, assuming it would cause it to get brittle like steel, however, it seems that copper, brass, and bronze all soften when cooled in water (exactly the opposite of steel), so apparently that is actually what you want to do! Guess I'm going to have to try water cooling next time to see if there is a difference. In either case, work hardening is a real thing for brass cases and it will not hurt in any way to anneal. Based on how each person loads, some may see a difference, some may not. I had some necks cracking after 3-4 reloads which is why I started annealing, never had one since.
 
Brass is non-intuitively different from steel. Brass is best annealed by heating then a water quench. For steel that would increase hardness.

For tightest groups and most consistent result get an induction annealer like ANP machine
 
FYI for those of you thinking about trying annealing and wondering how to do it, this is an easy and inexpensive, though very un-scientific way to do it. Get a cordless drill (probably already have one), the mandrel from the attached link (or any place you can find similar- sockets also work) and a propane torch from harbor freight or any other place you can find one cheap. Slowly spin the brass with the drill and mandrel and lower into the flame so it just touches the inner part of the flame, right at the shoulder angle and watch the flame. As soon as the flame color starts to change to orange pull the brass out. Has worked well for me so far.
 

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