AFRICAN TICK BITE FEVER WHO'S GOT IT!

Discussion in 'Hunting Africa' started by Cliffy, Apr 24, 2011.

  1. Cliffy

    Cliffy AH Elite

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    Here's a new one for me on my 4th safari - I contracted African Tick Bite Fever!
    Got the sever headache and the sore lymph nodes (on the side of the tick bite, never bi-lateral inflamation), the shakes and chills and general maliase feeling for 2 days. Seems Nov - April in the RSA is the most active time to contract it. IT MUST BE TREATED to avoid liver damage but it's easy with Doxycyclene (100 mg tablets twice a day for 7 days). Feel better in 2 or 3 days but finish the pills to avoid a relapse in 6 months.
    Always something new to learn.
     
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  2. michaelhh375

    michaelhh375 AH Veteran

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    Dear fellow hunters. I recomend to get TBE vaccination for any country with risk of ticks.

    Check out the following website for information on TBE (tick-borne encephalitis): www.tbe-prevention.info


    Tick-borne Encephalitis (TBE)
    by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    What is tick-borne encephalitis?

    Tick-borne encephalitis, or TBE, is a human viral infectious disease involving the central nervous system. The disease is most often manifest as meningitis (inflammation of the membrane that surrounds the brain and spinal cord), encephalitis (inflammation of the brain), or meningoencephalitis (inflammation of both the brain and meninges). Although TBE is most commonly recognized as a neurologic disease, mild febrile illnesses can also occur. Long-lasting or permanent neuropsychiatric sequelae are observed in 10-20 percent of infected patients.

    What causes tick-borne encephalitis?
    TBE is caused by tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV), a member of the family Flaviviridae, and was initially isolated in 1937. Three virus sub-types are described: European or Western tick-borne encephalitis virus, Siberian tick-borne encephalitis virus, and Far eastern Tick-borne encephalitis virus (formerly known as Russian Spring Summer encephalitis virus).

    How is TBEV spread, and how do humans become infected?
    Ticks act as both the vector and reservoir for TBEV. The main hosts are small rodents, with humans being accidental hosts. Large animals are feeding hosts for the ticks, but do not play a role in maintenance of the virus. The virus can chronically infect ticks and is transmitted both transtadially (from larva to nymph to adult ticks) and transovarially (from adult female tick through eggs). TBE cases occur during the highest period of tick activity (between April and November), when humans are infected in rural areas through tick bites. Infection also may follow consumption of raw milk from goats, sheep, or cows. Laboratory infections were common before the use of vaccines and availability of biosafety precautions to prevent exposure to infectious aerosols. Person-to-person transmission has not been reported. Vertical transmission from an infected mother to fetus has occurred.

    Where is the disease found?
    TBE is an important infectious disease of in many parts of Europe, the former Soviet Union, and Asia, corresponding to the distribution of the ixodid tick reservoir. The annual number of cases (incidence) varies from year to year, but several thousand are reported annually, despite historical under-reporting of this disease.

    What are the symptoms of TBE?
    The incubation period of TBE is usually between 7 and 14 days and is asymptomatic. Shorter incubation times have been reported after milk-borne exposure. A characteristic biphasic febrile illness follows, with an initial phase that lasts 2 to 4 days and corresponds to the viremic phase. It is non-specific with symptoms that may include fever, malaise, anorexia, muscle aches, headache, nausea, and/or vomiting. After about 8 days of remission, the second phase of the disease occurs in 20 to 30 percent of patients and involves the central nervous system with symptoms of meningitis (e.g., fever, headache, and a stiff neck) or encephalitis (e.g., drowsiness, confusion, sensory disturbances, and/or motor abnormalities such as paralysis) or meningoencephalitis. In contrast to RSSE, TBE is more severe in adults than in children.

    During the first phase of the disease, the most common laboratory abnormalities are a low white blood cell count (leukopenia) and a low platelet count (thrombocytopenia). Liver enzymes in the serum may also be mildly elevated. After the onset of neurologic disease during the second phase, an increase in the number of white blood cells in the blood and the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is usually found. Virus can be isolated from the blood during the first phase of the disease. Specific diagnosis usually depends on detection of specific IgM in either blood or CSF, usually appearing later, during the second phase of the disease.

    The range of clinical manifestations can be observed following infection by either sub-type of TBE viruses Biphasic symptomatology (fever then neurological disorders) is frequent after infection by the European TBE subtype. Infections by the Far-eastern TBE subtype are in general more severe and the case-fatality rate is higher. The Siberian subtype could be responsible for chronic TBE.

    Are there any complications after recovery?
    In approximately two-thirds of patients infected with the TBE virus, only the early (viremic) phase is seen. In the remaining third, patients experience either the typical biphasic course of the disease or a clinical illness that begins with the second (neurologic) phase. The convalescent period can be long and the incidence of sequelae may vary between 30 and 60 percent, with long-term or even permanent neurologic symptoms. Neuropsychiatric sequelae have been report in 10-20 percent of patients.

    Is the disease ever fatal?
    Yes, but only rarely, and variable within the subtype of TBE virus. In general, mortality is 1 to 2 percent, with deaths occurring 5 to 7 days after the onset of neurologic signs.

    How is TBE treated?
    There is no specific drug therapy for TBE. Meningitis, encephalitis, or meningoencephalitis require hospitalization and supportive care based on syndrome severity. Anti-inflammatory drugs, such as corticosteroids, may be considered under specific circumstances for symptomatic relief. Intubation and ventilatory support may be necessary.

    Who is at risk for TBEV infection?
    In disease endemic areas, people with recreational or occupational exposure to rural or outdoor settings (e.g., hunters, campers, forest workers, farmers) are potentially at risk for infection by contact with the infected ticks. Furthermore, as tourism expands, travel to areas of endemicity broadens the definition of who is at risk for TBE infection.

    How can TBEV infections be prevented?
    Like other tick-borne infectious diseases, TBEV infection can be prevented by using insect repellents and protective clothing to prevent tick bites. A vaccine is available in some disease endemic areas (though not currently in the United States); however, adverse vaccine-reactions in children limit the utility of the product.

    Other related viruses
    The family Flaviviridae includes other tick-borne viruses affecting humans and these viruses are closely related to TBEV and RSSEV, such as Omsk hemorrhagic fever virus in Siberia, Al Khumra virus in Saudi Arabia, and Kyasanur Forest disease virus in India. Louping ill virus (United Kingdom) is a member of this family; it causes disease primarily in sheep and has been reported as a cause of a TBE-like illness in laboratory workers and persons at risk for contact with sick sheep (e.g., veterinarians, butchers).
     
  3. enysse

    enysse AH Ambassador

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    I hear more tick problems in the last 2 years, than I ever care to hear. I recommend everyone do a through body search every night.
     
  4. michaelhh375

    michaelhh375 AH Veteran

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    I have to agree, to bring a female friend to make a full and tough body search every night after a hard days walk in the bush, can be more fun then a TBE vaccination ! :D
     
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  5. enysse

    enysse AH Ambassador

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    I agree michael375 ! :)
     
  6. AfricaHunting.com

    AfricaHunting.com FOUNDER AH Ambassador

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    African Tick-bite Fever

    Find attached an Emerging Infectious Diseases article on African Tick-bite Fever from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in a pdf format.
     

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  7. AfricaHunting.com

    AfricaHunting.com FOUNDER AH Ambassador

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    Cliffy, I wish you the best recovery.
     
  8. Cliffy

    Cliffy AH Elite

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    Recovery going well Last day of treatment Really no big deal.
    The CDC article is saved for my wife to get into and get into she will as she is a certified Lab Technologist here in the states.
    Like I said, " Alway something new to learn about Africa"
     
  9. enysse

    enysse AH Ambassador

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    A bunch of people I know got it last too. I have sensitive skin and can always feel those damn ticks! But other people not so much and the real problem is when they get in your hair and attach to the skull of your head. It pays to do a search every night....I've done it for other people and would rather have them safe than sorry.
     
  10. Bushbuck

    Bushbuck AH Enthusiast

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    Just reading this thread makes me itchy.
     
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  11. fhm3006

    fhm3006 AH Enthusiast

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    "GARLICK guys...eat lots and lots of garlic and then some, just before and during your hunt in tick infested areas, those damn ticks do not like the smell of garlic on your skin" :cook2:

    ...well, at least that is what my old man used to tell everyone - may his soul rest in peace.

    I myself have not tried it before - prefer my favorite insect repellent rather.:fly:

    On the down side - if you do take a lady with on your hunt...I seriously doubt she will appreciate your "garlick fever"...:doh2:
     
    Last edited: Apr 27, 2011
  12. enysse

    enysse AH Ambassador

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    Yep, I don't think any lady will like the garlic kiss (lol)! On the brightside she might want the pat-down at the end of the day checking for ticks (lol). Hope she's beautiful!
     
  13. Mike B

    Mike B AH Senior Member

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    Thanks for this post! The Doc didn't want to prescribe Doxy because she thought I was talking about Lyme disease and that's not a real worry. I did a quick search on the mobile app, found this and now I have a bottle of doxy ready for my trip in Sept. BOOM
     
  14. Erny

    Erny AH Veteran

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    I got African Tick Bite Fever in 2012. Lucky I did not get symptomatic until I was back in the USA. It was horrible, every muscle ached, fever, and horrible nausea. I thought I was going to die. Luckily when I went my Doctor he recognized the symptoms immediately and got me on an antibiotic. It was at least a week before I felt a 100%.
     
  15. CLICKBANGBANG

    CLICKBANGBANG AH Senior Member

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    I see the tick loads on some animals, and I just start itching. I heard and eland called a tick taxy... Dang those poor things.

    Is it just per small area, or is one particular country housing most of the continents ticks? My uncles small property in Arkansas houses more ticks than all of California. I'm thoroughly convinced that there are more ticks in NW AR, than there are people in the continental US.
     
  16. GA Hunter

    GA Hunter AH Veteran

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    I got it in 2014 and had pretty much the same experience. Thought I was going to die. The worst part of it was that I had 5 bites in my crotch region. Two of which were on the WORST possible part of the WORST possible organ. Talk about misery. And it wasn't all that easy to explain to the wife either.

    Ouch!

    BD
     
  17. gillettehunter

    gillettehunter AH Legend

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    I think it was 2011 that I got it while in the East Cape. Because of this forum I figured out what it was. Was in Vegas for our biggest buying show of the yr. Got to go to the ER. Doc agreed and prescribed the doxy. Was glad to get over that buy. I now take doxy with me as well as do better tick prevention. Bruce
     
  18. BWH

    BWH AH Elite

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    Sawyers makes Mxi Deet.... 100% Deet, and there is a pump bottle spray that uses Permethrin (dorless)..... Apply to clothes, shoes, socks..... last a long time.
     
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  19. CAustin

    CAustin BRONZE SUPPORTER AH Ambassador

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    Thanks for bringing this one back up!
     
  20. kathy

    kathy AH Fanatic

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    No I Haven't had it yet ,I take a can of Permethrin with me and spray down daily in Africa. will not go in our wood in N.C. with out it. Forrest
     

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