9.3x62 vs 375H&H

Which is the better all around non Dangerous Game caliber for Africa?


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Ridgewalker

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I only take my 375 when going to Africa. You just never know what will show up and my confidence is in being prepared. The 9.3 would probably work fine.
 

TOBY458

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I have both. And from what I've experienced, I think either would work fine in the areas that I've hunted so far. However, if shots are longer and you're hunting game such as Eland, I would say a good 270 grain 375 bullet traveling at 2750 fps would trump anything a 9.3x62 has to offer.
 

mark-hunter

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I've hunted africa twice, first time with 375 hh (camp gun).
Since recently I own my own 375 hh. I also own 9.3x62.

I think that on performance on large animals there will not be much difference.
375 hh, on the other hand gives undisputable versatility to use on PG and DG, and 9.3 is legally accepted as buffalo caliber, only from case to case, but not in all African countries. So, the real difference is legal one, not so much practical one, and only for DG.

For plains game, equally good.
 

WAB

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I have both and love both of them. I think that you have to give the edge to the .375 on DG and 300+ yard shots on PG. The 9.3 gets a big edge on recoil and typical rifle weight if that is important to you.

I have done very few non DG safaris (self confessed buffalo addict). However, I did an awesome tracking hunt for eland in Botswana. I used my .375 with outstanding results. However, if I do this hunt again, which is likely, I will carry the 9.3x62. It is lighter, just as accurate, and has plenty of punch and reach for eland with 286 gr Swift A-Frames.
 

BeeMaa

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I don't own a 9.3x62 so I'm certainly at a disadvantage.
And I didn't' cast a vote because of this.

The ballistics between the two are close.
However, it's clear the 375 delivers more energy on paper.
But I doubt any animal would be able to tell the difference.

I chose the 375 because it is UNIVERSALLY accepted for hunting DG.
The 9.3x62 is accepted in some places, but not all.
And the best Dagga Boy is gonna show up when you are hunting PG.
Plan accordingly.
 

Red Leg

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I have a bit of real world experience with both (including the 9.3x74R as well). The .375 with 300 gr bullet has a slight, but quantifiable edge over the 286 gr 9.3. I hunt black bears and boars with the 9.3 and Buffalo and PG with the .375.
 

Forrest Halley

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I think the number one thing that turns me off with the 9.3 is that it is one mm shorter than the .30-06 and trying to push a bigger bullet. I have a .375 H&H or three so I am biased and well equipped for one and not the other. If I were going to go 9.3 it would be in the 74 length. It's a purely psychological thing for me that if I go larger in bore, the casing should be longer than the last smaller one. I wish I had found the .375 twenty years ago.
 

Professor Mawla

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If someone were to ask me this question during the 1970s ( when I first began hunting ) , then I would personally opt for the 9.3x62 mm Mauser . This is simply because ( during the 1970s ) ammunition ( and bullets ) for the 9.3x62 mm Mauser were of far better quality than ammunition ( and bullets ) for the .375 H&H Magnum .

The only .375 H&H brand of factory loaded ammunition which one could get ( back in those days ) , were from Winchester Western and Remington Peters . Neither were very good . Let us talk about Winchester first . Their full metal jacket 300 grain solid bullets had flat noses and no steel in the jackets . They were practically guaranteed to break apart , upon striking the bones of Gaur or Asiatic jungle elephant bulls . This was no good . A close friend and former colleague of mine ( forest ranger Abu Sayeed ) actually got killed by a charging Gaur bull , by attempting to use this .375 H&H Magnum ammunition to take a frontal heart shot on the animal . In 1974 ; Winchester altered the jacket material of their patented Silvertip soft nosed bullets from a mixture of copper , nickel and zinc to aluminum ( in order to reduce manufacturing costs ) . The “ updated “ bullet was completely unreliable for hunting anything dangerous . Remington’s full metal jacket 300 grain solid bullets actually employed far thinner jackets than the ones employed in Winchester’s full metal jacket 300 grain solid bullets . And Remington did not manufacture a 300 grain Core Lokt soft nose factory load ( they only offered a 270 grain Core Lokt factory load ) .

The only .375 calibre bullets ( for the hand loading market ) which were available during this time were from Barnes and Hornady . Barnes copper jacketed lead cored solid bullets were quite prone to severe distortion , upon striking the bones of Gaur and Asiatic jungle elephant bulls . Their Barnes Original soft nosed bullets were quite excellent , however . Hornady cupronickel jacketed lead cored solid bullets were also prone to severe distortion , while their soft nosed bullets frequently came apart ; creating only superficial injuries on the intended target animals .

By contrast , RWS manufactured excellent factory loaded ammunition for the 9.3x62 mm Mauser . Their 293 grain RWS TUG soft nosed factory loads were absolutely unrivaled in terms of terminal and ballistic performance . They also used to offer exceptionally sturdily constructed 286 grain steel jacketed solid factory loads ; which could be successfully used against the largest of Asiatic jungle elephant bulls ( even when frontal brain shots were required ) .

Today however ( with the advent of modern factory loaded ammunition and reloading components ) , I would opt for the .375 H&H Magnum in the blink of an eye . It is the bare minimum legal calibre for hunting dangerous game , in most African countries . It can employ a 14 grain heavier 300 grain bullet ( to say nothing of Norma’s new 350 grain factory loads , which employ Woodleigh bullets ) . And ammunition for it , is comparatively easier to find in even those out of the way places .
 

One Day...

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Objectively?

Based on having used all three modern 9.3s and the .375:

1) If you take DG off the table? Neither 9.3 nor .375! A .300 is a much more versatile all-around PG round.

2) If you hunt mostly PG with the occasional buff: the .375 hits a bit harder and has a little more reach with 300 gr slugs; and a lot more reach and still hits like a hammer with modern expanding monolithic slugs like Nosler's 260 gr E-Tip; Barnes 250 gr TTSX; or even Barnes 270 gr TSX. I doubt a buff would notice the difference on most lung/heart cavity shots, although they will likely not go through him lengthwise like a 300 gr solid would...

Does 9.3 vs. .375 matter? Yes, but in your mind mostly :) and only past 200 yards in the field...

+1 on the 9.3x64 if it was not on the path to extinction, and the 9.3x74R is to the rimmed .375 what the 9.3x62 is to the belted .375...
 
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I think the number one thing that turns me off with the 9.3 is that it is one mm shorter than the .30-06 and trying to push a bigger bullet. I have a .375 H&H or three so I am biased and well equipped for one and not the other. If I were going to go 9.3 it would be in the 74 length. It's a purely psychological thing for me that if I go larger in bore, the casing should be longer than the last smaller one. I wish I had found the .375 twenty years ago.
@Forrest Halley
It might be 1mm shorter but it will push a big bullet very easily and comfortably to get the job done. The same goes for the Whelen. Both very capable rounds.
The As me are a bucket load shorter than the 06 but need I say more.
I know you like your 375s. They are good and just a bit better than the 9.3x62
Bob
 
 

 

 

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