416 Remington reloading tips

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by RStien321, Dec 18, 2017.

  1. RStien321

    RStien321 AH Member

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    Hello,

    I am diving into reloading with a newly purchased 416 Remington Magnum. I was wondering if anyone has any tips, tricks, or recommendations to developing loads?

    Are there any tools for the 416 Remington that will make reloading easier? I am most concerned about finding a tool to appropriately size the cases without oversizing. The Hornady headspace comparator doesn't seem to have a big enough bushing to accommodate the 416.

    Thanks!
     

  2. Heeler75

    Heeler75 AH Veteran

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    I wouldn't worry about going that detailed on a cartridge like a 416 RM. I'd screw the die in just enough to resize the neck and to make sure it chambers. Then seat the bullet to the cannelure (Swift A-Frame type), make sure it chambers and fits in the mag box, and crimp. On the Barnes (driving bands and grooves) style make sure you're not over book COAL, see if it chambers and fits the mag box, then crimp in one of the grooves. Easy peasy.

    I also just bought a 416 RM and going to do like this. I bought a Lee Factory Crimp Die to make the crimping process easier.
     
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  3. Shootist43

    Shootist43 AH ENABLER GOLD SUPPORTER AH Legend

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    I use Redding Dies then a separate Lee Factory Crimp Die. If you are new to reloading a good book may help you get started. The one I'd suggest is Practical Reloading by Nathan Foster.
     

  4. Heeler75

    Heeler75 AH Veteran

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    Almost forgot. You'll definitely want to trim all your brass so you will have a uniform crimp.

    Lyman is a good all around book to learn from also.

    What bullets you planning to start with?
     

  5. Buckdog

    Buckdog AH Enthusiast

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    rstein and heeler, I reload the 416 rem and have been reloading decades. So a few quick tips regarding the 416rem.
    1st be safe and use a manual starting with lower pressure loads
    2 this is a DG round/gun so it has to work aka function EXTRACT flawlessly every round. So don't neck size, full length size!
    3 If you don't already have one get a chronograph to work up your loads . the trick is to get the solids to shoot same POI as the lead, that usually means the same velocity.
    4. when you get a load worked up I suggest that if you get an opportunity put the gun and rounds out in the hot sun and let them heat up like in Africa good then shoot and make sure the cases extract and are functioning perfectly.
    Don't be silly like me and lock the 416 down too much in a lead sled for load development and destroy your scope :(
    If you don't have a CRF gun be extra careful with hot loads as extractors on Rem 700 break real easy with the big rds.
    have fun and be safe and if you want more specifics send me a PM(y)
     

  6. RStien321

    RStien321 AH Member

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    Thanks for all the feedback! Is using a crimping die something that is universally done on 416 or other big bores? Just something I've never done or others that I know do on sub .30 cal rounds.

    I'm planning to load 400gr A-Frames to start. I plan on shooting bigger PG first and am probably 5-6 years from any DG hunt.
     

  7. fourfive8

    fourfive8 AH Fanatic

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    ^^ Yes, good advice!
    I use a standard 416 Rem Mag RCBS 2 die set. Adjust the FL sizing die so every cartridge chambers easily. Doesn't mean screwed all the way down necessarily but enough so ALL rounds chamber easily. Use "extreme" powders for such hunting/DG cartridges. No need to hot rod loads and risk pressure spikes in the heat. Most factory max loads are about 2400 fps with the 400 grain bullet. I keep all my loads down around 2350 for all hunting bullets in the 370 - 400 grain range. I use Varget (one the of temp insensitive powders) and easily get the 2350 + or - with all bullets I use. Trim all cases to standard trim length. Use a chronograph for load development

    After 1 to 3 full pressure firings you will likely notice some resistance to chambering. It is simply the body of the case just ahead of the belt that is not being resized with the standard sizing die.. no matter how far down the sizing die is set. To get a few more firings out of the cases I use an Innovative Technologies belted case, base sizing die. It is a collet type die and the best way I know of to resize the area just in front of the belt. The cases need to be crimped to prevent bullet jamming during recoil. As has been suggested, use a Lee factory crimp die instead of the crimping shoulder in the seating die. The Lee factory crimp die is a collet design and is far superior to the roll crimp provided by the shoulder of the seating die.

    The idea is to have 100 % confidence in the reliability of the ammo. Overall, the I found the 416 Rem to be a very easy cartridge to deal with.
     
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  8. Buckdog

    Buckdog AH Enthusiast

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    Totally agree with fourfive eight, except I use Reloader 15 and Hornady brass and I run my rds a bit hotter but they function flawlessly in my gun. SO CAREFULLY WORK UP LOADS THAT WORK FLAWLESSLY FOR YOUR GUN AS ALL GUNS AND CHAMBERS ARE DIFFERENT!!
    the 400 gr barnes solids are long and you have to carefully and slowly seat them down as they are a compressed load or you will crunch the case and ruin it with distortion.
     
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  9. 375 Ruger Fan

    375 Ruger Fan AH ENABLER GOLD SUPPORTER AH Legend

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  10. fourfive8

    fourfive8 AH Fanatic

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    Those are pretty good articles on the Win 70 and 416 Rem Mag. The only misleading thing I noticed is the chart in part 1 showing standard MAPs for the cartridges listed. One would think the Rigby operates at 47 kpsi with the standard 400 gr 2400 fps load while the Rem Mag operates at 62 kpsi with the standard 400 gr 2400 fps load. Also, the actual modern SAAMI MAP for the 416 Rigby cartridge is 52 kpsi.

    Those are industry standardized MAPs for the cartridges and not necessarily average working pressures of any particular load. With certain powders and bullets, the Rigby can propel a 400 gr bullet at 2400 fps at approximately 44- 47 kpsi. With certain powders and bullets, the Rem Mag can propel a 400 gr bullet at 2400 fps at approximately 50 kpsi. Neither pressure range can be considered high.

    The Rigby fans when comparing their cartridge to other 416s always bring up the temperature/pressure issue and the fact that some of the earliest factory loads for the Remington were loaded too hot. The simple fact is the Rigby design is based on 128 year old Cordite powder technology. In reality the Remington design with modern powders is more efficient and won't over pressure in high temperatures any more than the Rigby will. I hear working pressures quoted for the two cartridges which tend to exaggerate the differences... like, "my Rigby propels a 400 grain bullet at 2400 fps with only 43 kpsi while your Remington 416 "wannabe" has to use over 60 kpsi for the same velocity". BS nonsense! Load that Rigby with the wrong powder, hot rod the load a little, let it sit in 110 degree temperature and see if that big oversized straight walled case won't stick in the chamber! Also, given all other things equal in a bolt action-- a 416 Rigby and a 416 Remington and tell me which is easier to cycle quickly and reliably... :)
     
    Last edited: Dec 19, 2017

  11. ChrisG

    ChrisG AH Fanatic

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    Things you will NEED to load a .416:
    1. Dies
    2. a nice heavy duty press
    3. Brass
    4. Powder
    5. Bullets
    6. Primers

    The only other thing I would highly recommend is a Chronograph if you don't already have one.

    That might seem obvious, but I know a lot of people really get in to their "gadgets". This include reloading gadgets. A .416 is an honest 250 yard rifle which means you don't need to try and get it down to 0.5MOA. You don't need to weigh and measure every single charge,bullet, primer, brass... etc. More than anything, based upon it's recoil level, you need to shoot it often to be acclimated and capable of putting the bullet where you want it.

    I say all this because I used to be that way. I wanted everything from my cartridges. Screaming velocity, pinpoint accuracy, flat trajectory and a cup of tea. I got wrapped up in gadgets and neglected the skill aspect that is FAR more important. That was when I was 20 years old and hadn't hunted much. Now, with more experience under my belt... I am totally happy if the rounds land within 1.5 MOA, and are going fast enough to expand when they get there. I spend a lot more time stalking, tracking and getting close enough that I can't possibly miss.

    Of course I am super stoked if I get a 0.4" group at a higher velocity than I was expecting with no pressure signs and well below max charge. But I have learned to be content with practicality.

    Stick to basics.

    My recommendation is that you don't need to push a .416 anywhere near its max to kill anything on the planet. A 400 grain bullet at 2150fps will drop anything that walks. so I am happy when my .416 gets a 400 up to 2300 and 2250 is low pressure , lower recoil and still more than enough oomph. .416s also penetrate into next week.

    Also, a .416 is LOADS of fun with cast 375 grain bullets and TrailBoss powder. It sounds like a .45 colt when it goes off and kicks like a .308, but will still kill almost any thin skinned N. American game. .416s truly are the middle ground and the most versatile of the big bores!
     
    Last edited: Dec 19, 2017
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  12. ChrisG

    ChrisG AH Fanatic

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    Theoretically, The Rigby should win on both accounts. It will cycle easier because of the fact that the body is so much bigger than the neck and it has no belt on it. Increasing body to neck ratio is essentially the same as adding more bevel to the front of a cylinder to get it to enter a hole easier. Add to that the fact that it is heavily tapered and it feeds in and extracts out of the chamber of a tuned rifle like butter. a .416 Remington is almost nearly a straight walled case with very little shoulder and only 2.5 thousandths of taper between the rear and front. I think the Rigby would win this challenge even given the minutely longer bolt movement. The Rigby has all the attributes of a cartridge designed with only reliability in mind.

    Now I know in practicality, the Remington works just fine. I am just saying that given a scenario that might cause the remington to juuuussst fail to chamber, the rigby would have likely chambered just fine.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 20, 2017

  13. neckdeep

    neckdeep AH Enthusiast

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    I have recently started loading for the 416 Rem. I had a few 370 gr North Fork solids, loaded them up with 78 gr RL-15 and crimped them in with a Lee Crimp die. Shot a three shot group with all 3 touching at 2490 fps with a SD of 1.5. Load development done. The 370 NF SS produced excellent accuracy and same point of impact with 79 gr of RL-15. My first buff was shot with a 300 gr NF @ 2450fps, so I am guessing the 416 and 370 grainers will do the job again at the same speed or faster.

    416 Rem loading tips
    1) RL-15
    2)Northfork bulllets
    3)Lee Crimp dies
     

  14. Doc25

    Doc25 AH Member

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    As far as the crimp goes it keeps the bullet from getting setback in the case during recoil and possibly if they have a rough ride up the feed ramp.

    You’ll notice most factory ammo has a crimp. Crimp is also good for semi auto’s.

    Another good die to have is the lee neck sizing die. Once again it is a collet die. Lots of competition shooters use this die as well.

    First and foremost for a hunting round it must chamber well. Make sure that all bullets feed well through your mag and chamber well that you intend to hunt with.
     

  15. ChrisG

    ChrisG AH Fanatic

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    I'm pretty sure Lee does not make a .416
    RM collect neck sizer. A dangerous game cartridge should always be full length resized for reliability in feeding and extraction. Welcome to the best forum on earth by the way!
     

  16. Doc25

    Doc25 AH Member

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    I’m so used to the lee dies I never checked if they made one in that size. Lol. Guess I put the cart before the horse. Thanks for the welcome!
     

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