Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 21 to 25 of 25

They call me Mr. Retro!

This is a discussion on They call me Mr. Retro! within the Up To .375 forums, part of the HUNTING EQUIPMENT, FIREARMS & AMMUNITION category; Got a chance to shoot this thing yesterday. I could not be much more happy with it. Shot like a ...

  1. #21
    sestoppelman's Avatar
    sestoppelman is online now SILVER SUPPORTER
    Joined
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    2,196

    Member of NRA, NA Hunt Club

    Hunted Tanzania, Botswana, Zimbabwe (2), Namibia, South Africa

    Default

    Got a chance to shoot this thing yesterday. I could not be much more happy with it. Shot like a house-a-fire. At 50yds it kept 20 Sierra 150's with R15, 5 different charges, all in about 2 inches. At 100yds it kept 11 of 12, 180gr Sierras with W760, 3 charges in about 4 inches left tor right and 2.5 inches up and down. This with express sights on a late afternoon shoot with my old eyes. Both bullets were .311 diameter.
    Gun ran perfect. May be a keeper!
    Now I have to decide whether to restore it or leave it as is.

  2. #22
    AkMike's Avatar
    AkMike is online now AH Fanatic
    Joined
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    578

    Member of NRA-Life ASSRA DRSS

    AkMike has no Articles
    View AkMike's Photos

    Default

    It's earned that patina! Don't change it!!!

  3. #23
    Red Leg's Avatar
    Red Leg is online now GOLD SUPPORTER
    Joined
    May 2009
    Posts
    496

    Member of SCI NRA DSC life memberships

    Hunted Namibia, RSA, Germany, Austria, Argentina, Canada

    Default

    Restoration is always a question. The Brits, unlike Americans, regularly sent guns back to the manufacturer for "clean-up". That would include everything from oiling and stripping to recasecolor and refinishing of stocks. It is why American collectors are obsessed with original condition on Winchesters and Parkers and yet a fine Purdey or Cashmore in fabulous condition probably went "home" for work several times. Long way around to say that if you want to have your leespeed restored you would not hurt the value. Note I said restored and not refinished. You would need to send it to Turnbull or someone of his quality and the restoration will almost certainly cost more than the rifle. So while the value will be enhanced, you will likely have more into it than it's resulting value. I have done that on a couple of fine English SxS's, but I also intend to shoot them the rest of my life. And there is no one like Turnbull for that sort of work. Turnbull Mfg. Co. for firearm restoration of antique guns - antique revolvers, antique pistols - including 1886 Winchester rifles, Marlin rifles, Parker shotguns, Colt revolvers, and more

    The horizontal lever over the follower is a magazine cut-off. These were on a lot of early magazine rifles so that commanders could more easily control volley fire. Remember these early magazine rifles replaced single shots and the use of volleys had lasted through the Zulu War and the second Mahdi War in Sudan. The rifleman would keep a full magazine in reserve, using the rifle as a single shot. All that went out the window ten minutes into the First World War. Leespeeds were built on military actions, and the earliest likely would have a cutoff.
    "We sleep peaceably in our beds because rough men stand ready in the
    night to visit violence on those who would do us harm" Winston Churchill

  4. #24
    tahoe2 is offline New Member
    Joined
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    12
    tahoe2 has no Articles
    tahoe2 has no Photos

    Default

    whatever you decide, that's an awesome rifle.

  5. #25
    sestoppelman's Avatar
    sestoppelman is online now SILVER SUPPORTER
    Joined
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    2,196

    Member of NRA, NA Hunt Club

    Hunted Tanzania, Botswana, Zimbabwe (2), Namibia, South Africa

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Red Leg View Post
    Restoration is always a question. The Brits, unlike Americans, regularly sent guns back to the manufacturer for "clean-up". That would include everything from oiling and stripping to recasecolor and refinishing of stocks. It is why American collectors are obsessed with original condition on Winchesters and Parkers and yet a fine Purdey or Cashmore in fabulous condition probably went "home" for work several times. Long way around to say that if you want to have your leespeed restored you would not hurt the value. Note I said restored and not refinished. You would need to send it to Turnbull or someone of his quality and the restoration will almost certainly cost more than the rifle. So while the value will be enhanced, you will likely have more into it than it's resulting value. I have done that on a couple of fine English SxS's, but I also intend to shoot them the rest of my life. And there is no one like Turnbull for that sort of work. Turnbull Mfg. Co. for firearm restoration of antique guns - antique revolvers, antique pistols - including 1886 Winchester rifles, Marlin rifles, Parker shotguns, Colt revolvers, and more

    The horizontal lever over the follower is a magazine cut-off. These were on a lot of early magazine rifles so that commanders could more easily control volley fire. Remember these early magazine rifles replaced single shots and the use of volleys had lasted through the Zulu War and the second Mahdi War in Sudan. The rifleman would keep a full magazine in reserve, using the rifle as a single shot. All that went out the window ten minutes into the First World War. Leespeeds were built on military actions, and the earliest likely would have a cutoff.
    Funny you should mention Turnbull. I believe his site states no work on Enfields. I have not yet decided what to do with it. A gent on another forum is doing a little research on this rifle for me and he says restoring would not be a good idea. I have given some thought to both ways and see the good and bad points. This may not technically be a LEE SPEED as it is not so marked as those were marked.
    The action used on this one is of the very early Magazine Lee Enfield type, not a SMLE. Note it has the early cocking piece safety. This thing shoots really well for a 100 year old rifle. When I hear back from the Enfield guy I will post whatever info he has for me. He is trying to document as many of these as he can for a possible book.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2

Similar Threads

  1. mating call
    By bluey in forum Humorous Jokes, Stories or Pictures
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 04-20-2013, 10:29 AM
  2. WHEN DO YOU CALL THE HUNT IS OVER?
    By nieluyssafaris in forum Hunting Africa
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 05-09-2012, 11:00 AM
  3. Why We Hunt: Call of the Chase
    By Conservation Force in forum Hunting Africa
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 10-27-2010, 08:08 PM
  4. Call of the Wild - Lion Roar
    By AfricaHunting.com in forum Hunting Africa
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 06-27-2010, 10:08 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •