ZIMBABWE TROPHY ELEPHANT HUNTS FOR 2014 AVAILABLE AT GREAT PRICES

Discussion in 'GREAT DEALS on Hunts Worldwide' started by NYAMAZANA SAFARIS, Jul 30, 2013.

  1. NYAMAZANA SAFARIS

    NYAMAZANA SAFARIS AH Veteran

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2010
    Messages:
    166
    Likes Received:
    10
    My Photos:
    38
    Member of:
    DALLAS SAFARI CLUB ,ZIMBABWE PROFESSIONAL HUNTERS AND GUIDES. SCI.
    Hunted:
    TANZANIA ,ZIMBABWE , NEW ZEALAND , USA, SOUTH AFRICA
    Hunting dates in prime time available in February and March 2014

    12 DAYS @ US$ 1100 per day. Trophy Fee US$ 12 000

    CITES TAG, PERMIT,TRANSFER, AND TROPHY FIELD PREP AND DELIVERY TO TAXIDERMIST ALL INCLUSIVE $ 1000.

    TOTAL COST OF HUNT $ 26 200, INCLUDES PH AND VEHICLES, ALL STAFF, 3 MEALS A DAY, BEVERAGES, DAILY LAUNDRY.

    THIS HUNT WILL BE CONDUCTED IN RURAL DISTRICT COUNCIL LAND AS WELL AS PRIVATE LAND ADJACENT TO FORESTRY CONCESSIONS.

    DURING THIS TIME FRAME THERE IS A PEAK IN MOVEMENT DUE TO THE CROPS IN THE COUNCIL LAND .

    FOR THE PAST SEVERAL YEARS THE AVERAGE WEIGHT OF iVORY HAS BEEN BETWEEN 38LB AND 48LB.

    THIS YEAR TO DATE THERE HAVE BEEN 3 TAKEN OVER 50LB WITH ONE 62LB AND THE OTHERS IN THE 40LB REGION.

    EXPECT A MATURE BULL IN THE 40LB RANGE.

    OBSERVERS ARE $ 200 A DAY.

    NOT INCLUDED IS SIDE TRIPS TO HWANGE NATIONAL PARK AND VICTORIA FALLS . BEFORE AND AFTER THE HUNT ACCOMMODATION. GRATUITIES FOR SAFARI STAFF AND PH. ANY OTHER ANIMALS TAKEN WILL BE CHARGED AS PER PRICE LIST.

    BOOK THIS YEAR FOR NEXT YEAR OR 2015 AND YOU WILL GET THIS HUNT FOR $ 2500 LESS.



    GIAMPAOLO ANGELINI ELEPHANT 2013 046.jpg DSC06122.jpg Seth Brown.15.JPG Tony Quilter Elephant 2013 178.jpg DSCN2447.jpg DSCN0265.jpg
     
  2. Bobpuckett

    Bobpuckett GOLD SUPPORTER AH Legend

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2009
    Messages:
    4,073
    Likes Received:
    65
    Location:
    Russellville
    My Photos:
    27
    Member of:
    NAHC Life Member, NRA Life Member,SCI, Buckmasters
    Hunted:
    USA(from Coast to Coast and Alaska), Germany, South Africa, Canada
    Wayne Thats a great price and with a chance at an Elephant in the 50 lb range, Wish I could sneak that one in myself. good luck on the hunts btw do you have an idea of whhow many you will have available? Bob
     
  3. NYAMAZANA SAFARIS

    NYAMAZANA SAFARIS AH Veteran

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2010
    Messages:
    166
    Likes Received:
    10
    My Photos:
    38
    Member of:
    DALLAS SAFARI CLUB ,ZIMBABWE PROFESSIONAL HUNTERS AND GUIDES. SCI.
    Hunted:
    TANZANIA ,ZIMBABWE , NEW ZEALAND , USA, SOUTH AFRICA
    Bob it is a great price, and yes a chance at a 50lb is realistic, but I rather work on 40lbs there about. I will probably have 6 available for 2014 all depends on what happens before the show. Regards Wayne
     
  4. auroraoutfitting

    auroraoutfitting AH Member

    Joined:
    May 28, 2012
    Messages:
    20
    Likes Received:
    0
    Member of:
    SCI, Wild Sheep Foundation, APOS
    Which area are you hunting ? What camp ?

    Thanks for the info
    Jeff
     
  5. NYAMAZANA SAFARIS

    NYAMAZANA SAFARIS AH Veteran

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2010
    Messages:
    166
    Likes Received:
    10
    My Photos:
    38
    Member of:
    DALLAS SAFARI CLUB ,ZIMBABWE PROFESSIONAL HUNTERS AND GUIDES. SCI.
    Hunted:
    TANZANIA ,ZIMBABWE , NEW ZEALAND , USA, SOUTH AFRICA
    Hi Jeff, sorry for the late reply, I have just come into town for our annual quota setting AGM , anyway I am currently still on a hunt , just took another Elephant on the 3rd day of a 14 day hunt , so have time to do other things, my client is looking for another Bull which is non exportable so I will most likely be out of town for the rest of the month and back in the office mid September as I have 3 guys coming in to hunt Elephant on the 15th August and straight after that I have a Leopard hunt. My Elephant hunts are conducted in Rural council land Umgusa and Kusile which is adjacent to Forestry blocks Umgusa and Ngamo Forestry. I am situated basically 180km from Bulawayo towards Vic Falls. I have 3 camps ( all personally built ) to operate from depending where most of the Elephant movement may be.
     
  6. Normal Wells

    Normal Wells New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2014
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Wayne,

    Hi. I'm not a hunter but am interested in the products you offer. I get into 'discussions' with anti hunter types and would like a little more first hand info to back up the case for this type of hunting. Could you help me out with a few questions I have?

    I presume the trophy fee is paid to the government. Is that the local community? If in part, how much would the locals receive? I presume the local community gets the meat. I don't know how much meat would be on the average elephant. But could you tell me the weight and value (roughly) the meat would have for the locals? Also I expect local people do get some employment from accommodation of the hunters and maybe working in the field too. Would you know about how much they would benefit?

    Other benefits locals would get I figure must include safety for themselves, their crops, fences etc. Hard to put a value on. Can you think of any other benefits for the local people?

    My interest is partly selfish. I'm a farmer with cattle and I know that animal rights types will come after us more if they ever get done with you. So I see us as allies of sorts. We can't sit back hoping the crocodile will eat us last so every thing's OK.

    Thank you for your time and any info you can pass along.

    Whoops, I just noticed I wrote my name as Normal. Should be Norman. Too late now I guess.
     
  7. Bsums

    Bsums AH Veteran

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2014
    Messages:
    172
    Likes Received:
    60
    Hunted:
    USA, Africa
    This would be better posted as a thread rather than on advertisement.

    I can help a little bit though but definitely recommend moving these questions to a thread. The trophy fee is in fact paid to the government, but I don't know how much goes to the local communities. The locals do indeed get the meat and an elephant can weigh 7 tons. Although a lot of it is bones etc it is still a lot of meat. It takes a small village to butcher an Elephant. The local people do get a lot of employment from hunters, in many villages besides cattle it is the only source of income and in many areas you are required to employ the local villagers. They are paid salaries plus tips and are easily making more money than any others in some villages. The main benefit to the villages is the meat as they are not allowed to hunt the animals (although many poach) and it brings in a lot of money. The trophy fee also goes towards conservations and is used to stop poachers, maintain national parks, monitor animal populations, etc.
     
  8. CAustin

    CAustin AH Fanatic

    Joined:
    May 7, 2013
    Messages:
    910
    Likes Received:
    173
    My Photos:
    39
    Hunted:
    South Africa
    Wayne is the ivory exportable back to the USA?
     
    Bsums likes this.
  9. enysse

    enysse AH Ambassador

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2009
    Messages:
    6,521
    Likes Received:
    359
    My Photos:
    32
    Member of:
    Northeast Wisconsin SCI chapter, Lifetime member of NRA,RMEF
    Hunted:
    Namibia, South Africa (East Cape, Guateng and Limpopo)
    No the ivory stays in Zim(n)
     
  10. Wheels

    Wheels GOLD SUPPORTER AH Elite

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2012
    Messages:
    1,412
    Likes Received:
    185
    My Photos:
    45
    Hunted:
    Zimbabwe, Namibia, South Africa, Tanzania
    April 3, 2014 was the last day an American could shoot a Zimbabwe elephant and be able to import the ivory. I was fortunate that mine was shot the end of March. I still won't feel comfortable until everything is in my home.

    Hope USFW changes their mind soon. I'm not holding my breath.

    I believe Namibia and RSA are the only places that an American can import ivory from now.

    Hope this helps.
     
  11. NYAMAZANA SAFARIS

    NYAMAZANA SAFARIS AH Veteran

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2010
    Messages:
    166
    Likes Received:
    10
    My Photos:
    38
    Member of:
    DALLAS SAFARI CLUB ,ZIMBABWE PROFESSIONAL HUNTERS AND GUIDES. SCI.
    Hunted:
    TANZANIA ,ZIMBABWE , NEW ZEALAND , USA, SOUTH AFRICA
    Sorry guys have not been on here for a while. Thank you Bsums for answering some of the questions . Basically all the meat goes to the local people, figure on a average bull weighing 5 tonne / 5000Kg. Meat alone off the carcass around 2000kg maybe a little more. At the least look at a value of US$ 2 per 1kg so that's $2000 in meat alone . Never mind that All the organs /stomach is eaten absolutely nothing is wasted when 200 or more people come for Free meat the only thing left behind is a wet spot and 1 or 2 bones most times nothing is left not anything for Vultures at all. Ok the council or land owner where I hunt benefits 100% with regards to trophy fees. The council in turn utilizes the funds for the use in clinics , schools, boreholes / water wells, road maintenance, in general anywhere where funding is needed to benefit and compensate the local populations being affected by the Elephants when crops are damaged or personal property. I myself do a lot for the community by way of employing local craftsmen ( builders, thatchers, carpenters,scouts ) There are a few that are working in my camps as waiters and general hands. It doesn't stop there as I also develop the area by making new roads or opening old roads which they all benefit from as well as drill boreholes which I pump for the Elephant and the local herdsmen water their livestock at some of my water points. Not sure if I answered your query correctly let me know if there is anything else I can help with. I hope USFWL will see their mistake and permit USA hunters to import trophy Elephant again. I have already had to shoot 3 bulls this year as PAC and may have to shoot another 3 before the year is over. These bulls could have been hunted by paying clients and given the local community much needed funds over and above the meat that they received .
     
  12. NYAMAZANA SAFARIS

    NYAMAZANA SAFARIS AH Veteran

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2010
    Messages:
    166
    Likes Received:
    10
    My Photos:
    38
    Member of:
    DALLAS SAFARI CLUB ,ZIMBABWE PROFESSIONAL HUNTERS AND GUIDES. SCI.
    Hunted:
    TANZANIA ,ZIMBABWE , NEW ZEALAND , USA, SOUTH AFRICA
    One thing has to be understood . It makes no difference if USFWL prevent importation of Elephant trophy's back to the States. The same amount of Elephant is still going to be harvested either by countries that don't have this ban in effect or by guys like myself having to do PAC work . And in most places where there is no longer a Safari operator hunting because it doesn't pay anymore to be there, these animals are going to be killed / poached because now there will no longer be a presence of hunters on the ground and no longer will there be game scouts employed to help promote conservation and curb the poaching. And poachers quickly learn where there are opportunities and trust me it's not just the Elephant that will be in trouble so will all the other species,not just the animals but the trees will also be poached and cut for fire wood and curious or fence posts so the whole environment will be affected because now there is no value or reason to protect the Elephant ???? And when this happens the USFWL must not cry!!!!
     
  13. Bsums

    Bsums AH Veteran

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2014
    Messages:
    172
    Likes Received:
    60
    Hunted:
    USA, Africa
    I agree the most foolish conservation method is banning or not allowing exportation. Limitation on how many are hunted is needed but without the money, protection, management, etc hunters provide these animals will be in a very bad position. Very frequently species are regulated by anti-hunters into non existence. With not allowing exportation it lowers the money going into the conservation and causes a bunch of ivory to be sitting around prime for theft and unprotected Elephants/other species to be slaughtered by poachers.
     
  14. enysse

    enysse AH Ambassador

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2009
    Messages:
    6,521
    Likes Received:
    359
    My Photos:
    32
    Member of:
    Northeast Wisconsin SCI chapter, Lifetime member of NRA,RMEF
    Hunted:
    Namibia, South Africa (East Cape, Guateng and Limpopo)
    UWFWS will just blame Africa for not have a sound wildlife conservation plan without hunters involved, that is all. In reality, that is what they are all about right now:mad:.
     
    jeff and Royal27 like this.
  15. Normal Wells

    Normal Wells New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2014
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks. That was just the type of info I was looking for. Ideally, I would like to see the locals realizing top value for the animals they have to share the landscape with. I know hunters want the tusks. But what would you think if the locals were to sell the tusks to the Chinese for folk remedies? Or suppose some of the ivory was carved into art works (or made into piano keys or what have you), sold in the western market, and the shavings from the carving went to the Asian folk remedy market? This would not preclude the western hunter from purchasing those tusks. Or including the tusk value as part of the trophy fee. Any thoughts? Whether agreeing or not.
     
  16. ActionBob

    ActionBob AH Fanatic

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2011
    Messages:
    747
    Likes Received:
    302
    Member of:
    NRA
    Hunted:
    USA, South Africa, Zimbabwe
    Norman I am a livestock farmer as well, dairy. But from the USA. I am assuming your are in RSA, please correct me if I'm wrong.

    As for the animal rights people, we are already dealing with those issues in a big way over here.

    My wife was on the local school board and they had to throw away a lot of meat because some of it came fro ma slaughter plant that was caught on video using a fork lift to move a downed cow while it was still alive.. Now I am not condoning that practice by any means... But to throw away perfectly good meat simply because it came from the same processing plant (or butchery to you guys in Africa) where that occurred seemed like a down right sin!

    I did hunt an elephant in Zimbabwe and have tacked a few posts in the thread that had advertised the deal I took. I do plan to work on a full report and in fact you have me thinking of reporting on more of the total experience than just the hunt. The human experience went way past the actual hunting part. Very interesting to see the local politics play out when a village shows up to filet an elephant! From what I witnessed, you butcher an elephant much the same way as you eat one... One piece at a time!

    The local animal rights in Zimbabwe pretty much seem to be that the animals have the right to be eaten and beaten. Pretty tough being the outside donkeys, first the right one gets whips, then the left.... The two in the middle (on the 4 cylinder donkey darts anyway, which seemed to be most common) seem to get off easy... I saw several that had patches worn off their rumps from the whip. Our idiotic soccer mom's and face book fanatics in this country have no idea what they are raving about! People should go hungry once in a while and they might take a different view!
     
    enysse likes this.
  17. Wheels

    Wheels GOLD SUPPORTER AH Elite

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2012
    Messages:
    1,412
    Likes Received:
    185
    My Photos:
    45
    Hunted:
    Zimbabwe, Namibia, South Africa, Tanzania

    Normal,

    Welcome to AH.

    Virtually all ivory is going to the far east. I doubt you will find very much in the way of art, piano keys, etc coming into western countries these days. It is illegal except for trophy ivory.

    Trophy ivory that is brought back to the United States since (I believe 1989) has no value. It can't be sold. It can be given away, thrown away, destroyed, etc., but it can't be sold. Only ivory shot prior to 1989 can be traded in the US and you have to prove providence. You have private property that has value but you can't sell it.....government at work. If you are from another country, sorry to confuse things.

    A hunter today can't sell the tusks. A westerner can't buy the tusks unless they were taken prior to 1989. The ivory you see traded today in the USA for pistol grips, knife handles, cue balls, etc. was ivory shot and imported prior to 1989.

    Hope this helps.

    All the best.
     
  18. ActionBob

    ActionBob AH Fanatic

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2011
    Messages:
    747
    Likes Received:
    302
    Member of:
    NRA
    Hunted:
    USA, South Africa, Zimbabwe
    Please correct me if I'm wrong on this. But as I came to understand it, in Africa there is a sort of "market" for ivory as some governments auction it off occasionally. I believe this might be confiscated ivory from poached animals and ivory from PAC animals and possibly ration animals that may be shot to feed park staff, etc. So there is a legal trade and an established market value.

    However, as a hunter, I don't think I can personally or privately sell my ivory..... does that sound correct? Or can ivory be sold in Africa by a hunter, or through a taxidermist or broker?
     
  19. Bsums

    Bsums AH Veteran

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2014
    Messages:
    172
    Likes Received:
    60
    Hunted:
    USA, Africa
    The last thing the ivory should be used for is the Asian/Chinese remedies. This is what fuels the black market and results in the illegal poaching (slaughtering) of Elephants. What those in search of ivory for remedies need is education not ivory. Some ivory is used for art, etc but is older ivory that is not affected by the current laws. Ivory is highly valued due to its beauty and than those who think it contains magical properties. The supply is much lower then the demand and the means to acquire it illegally is a very real issue. Education is key for those driving the illegal market as you have to address the issue at the source, but until their is no illegal demand; better monitoring of the animals, more anti-poaching teams, resources into investigating buyers/sellers, resources for locating poachers, stiffer penalties for poachers and buys etc to prevent it as much as possible. The ability to actually sell ivory could help lessen the illegal poaching as their would be legal means of obtaining sought after items. Their is a small ivory market but it is very limited as old ivory can be sold, 1989 as someone stated above but its not large enough to support the demand.
     
  20. Wheels

    Wheels GOLD SUPPORTER AH Elite

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2012
    Messages:
    1,412
    Likes Received:
    185
    My Photos:
    45
    Hunted:
    Zimbabwe, Namibia, South Africa, Tanzania
    (y)
    Bob,

    There is not a legal market as we think of a market to sell tusks. Governments ask for exemptions, get it and sell ivory occasionally. If I remember correct, Japan and/or China have been the last couple of buyers. I don't think there has been a sell in a few years. Consequently the ivory stacks up in African government warehouses. I presume a lot of that ivory goes out the back door to the black market.

    You shoot an elephant and have the ivory. You can't sell the ivory in Africa or any place legally. There is no legal market. If I remember correct, you have 40kg of ivory. If the market rate is $800/kg (not sure what it is) then it is worth $32,000 on the black market. It, however has no value to you other than as a trophy because it can't be sold.

    This is not an area I have any expertise in so don't just go off of what I say. This is my understanding of the situation. If a more knowledgeable person disagrees, I gladly stand corrected. I originally commented on this thread to help clarify Normal's question/statements.

    I am happy to hear if someone else want to clarify my comments.

    Hope you can get your ivory back someday. Otherwise I hope you have a trusted friend that will let you visit it occasionally! (y)

    All the best.
     

Share This Page