Zebra hunting

Discussion in 'Hunting Africa' started by billc, Mar 17, 2014.

  1. billc

    billc SILVER SUPPORTER AH Elite

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    After my son took his zebra this became as must have for me.I am wondering how many different ones there are to hunt.I hope to take a burchells this trip and a mountain zebra when I get to namibia one day.I have seen it on some price list a cape mountain zebra and have heard someone talk about a bone zebra but know nothing about were they maybe hunted.So how many zebras can be hunted and what difference are there in them.I know the mtn zebra has no shadow strips but what about the cape mtn or bone.Just trying to add to my future list for africa. :praying:
     
  2. Hank2211

    Hank2211 GOLD SUPPORTER AH Fanatic

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    The experts will no doubt wiegh in. I have hunted the Burchell or plains zebra, which I beleive is the most common. It tends to have shadow striping in southern Africa, but the shadow stripes disappear as you move farther north to Tanzania and Kenya.

    I have also hunted the Hartmann mountain zebra. I believe - and I have no doubt I will be corrected if I am wrong - that there are two subspecies of mountain zebra - the cape mountain zebra and the Hartmann zebra (both equus zebra, but E. zebra zebra in the first case and E. zebra hartmannae in the second). I'm not sure I could tell the two sub-species apart, but the Hartmann is easy to differentiate from the Burchall. The Hartmann is generally larger, has more of a "fishbone" stripe pattern with no shadow stripes at all, and has a browish striped face as well as a prominent dewlap. The Hartmann also tends to have a longer and therefore "scruffier" mane than the Burchall.

    Personally, I find the Hartmann makes a much nicer rug, since it has more of a "velvet" type of hide with luster, if that term can be applied to a hide, whereas the Burchall has more of a normal hair feel to it.

    I have found both can be difficult to hunt in their own way. All zebra seem extremely skittish - likely from being on the menu for lions. The plains zebra can be hard to approach to get a decent shot, because of the lack of cover, and the Hartmann are in difficult terrain. Again, just my experience, but even with a killing shot, they seem able to soak up the lead and travel a fair distance. Always been happy to have a good tracker with me!

    Hope this helps!
     
  3. billc

    billc SILVER SUPPORTER AH Elite

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    Thanks hank I just never heard of the cape mtn zebra before.How to get more info from guys on how many different kind there are to hunt.
     
  4. KMG Hunting Safaris

    KMG Hunting Safaris SPONSOR AH Elite

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    Bill, As far as I know and the last time I heard, as an American, you won't be able to import the Cape Mountain Zebra into the US.
     
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  5. billc

    billc SILVER SUPPORTER AH Elite

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    Marius that is good to know.I can not find to much info on the cape mountain zebra.If I cant bring it home I would not want to hunt one anyway.Thanks for the help
     
  6. Diamondhitch

    Diamondhitch AH Legend

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    Grevys zebra in Tanzania, Burchells Zebra and the 2 Mountain Zebras are all separate species. I have never heard of a bone zebra.

    Cape Mountain Zebra is CITES I so good luck getting a permit anywhere on the planet. Beautiful animals, bigger than the Hartmanns I believe. With any luck SA breeders will remedy the lack of Cape Mountain Zebras and get them downrated to CITES II or right off the list ideally.
     
  7. billc

    billc SILVER SUPPORTER AH Elite

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    so there is one I missed to as I never heard of the grevys zebra before.I have only seen the bone zebra talked about like twice in 5 years.Cant even remember were so can go back and look.I guess I could maybe google it and see what comes up.:confused: what an idea lol
     
  8. gi jane

    gi jane AH Enthusiast

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    Can't hunt a Grevy's as far as I know. I saw some of that species I believe on my trip to Kenya in 1995. Protected from hunting from what I've read. My first animal was a Burchell's, (plains zebra). After about three days of stalking we got lucky. Whatever the case, hunting a zebra is very challenging and makes for a beautiful trophy. From what I understand not too many of the locals eat zebra flesh, (some do of course) but I tried it and I have to admit ( I am a semi-veg, only ate the meat of my kills) it was the best meat I have ever eaten, second only to the eland liver. My Ph insisted on a trophy with a tail, and of course a stallion.. Hard to distinguish sometimes but with an experienced PH it's not too difficult. Good luck!! I am very proud of my beautiful zebra trophy rug.
     
  9. ThomasBeaham

    ThomasBeaham BRONZE SUPPORTER AH Enthusiast

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    Billc,

    Maybe Boehm's Zebra?

    "E. q. boehmi (Grant's Zebra or Boehm's Zebra) is found in Zambia, west of the Luangwa River, west to Kariba, Shaba Province of DR Congo north to Kibanzao Plateau; Tanzania north from Nyangaui and Kibwezi into south-west Uganda, south- west Kenya as far as Sotik, and east Kenya, east of the Rift Valley, into southern Ethiopia and perhaps to the Juba River in Somalia.

    Read more here: IUCN Equids Specailist Group
     
  10. ThomasBeaham

    ThomasBeaham BRONZE SUPPORTER AH Enthusiast

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    I believe it is possible to hunt the Chapman's subspecies in Mozambique's Coutada 9
     
  11. billc

    billc SILVER SUPPORTER AH Elite

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    seems to be more of them then I thought.I know remember hearing about the chapman to.That boehm's could be what I thought was the bone one.I am looking forward to one day hunting the mtn zebra for sure.Anyone who I have talked with just had good things to say about that hunt.
     
  12. RogerHeintzman

    RogerHeintzman AH Enthusiast

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    billc,

    Namibia is the place for Hartmann'a Mt. Zebra. Very reasonable priced, indigenous to Namibia. They are larger then the Burchell's. The stripe pattern on the rump above the tail is awesome. Great for a rug.

    Shot two in 2012, one rug, one pedestal.


    "A dream can be relived, again and again in Africa."
     
  13. tap

    tap AH Enthusiast

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    the boehms is the most beautiful in my book and i am currently looking to find another one to hunt. the one i shot in zambia was ruined at the taxidermist and as of yet i havent seen anyone advertise any for a hunt. here is a picture of me with my boehms zebra.

    image.jpg
     
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  14. PHOENIX PHIL

    PHOENIX PHIL AH Legend

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    Perhaps @spike.t aka Mike can help you out here. I think he's on his way to Vegas at the moment, but hopefully sees this soon.
     
  15. Jaco Strauss

    Jaco Strauss AH Legend

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    Boehms occur in Niassa as well, @diamonhitch quite correct that according to current lit....the two mountain species are listed separately, once again though, biologists have created confusion, by creating subspecies on morphological differences alone...... This is an old non scientific tendency which hopefully we will be rid of one day.

    Groves and Bell devided plains zebra into six subspecies, based on coat patterns, skull metrics, and the presence or absence of a mane and of the infundibulum on the lower incisors (intergrades are observed).

    All morphological traits and or differences.

    A recent genetic study analyzed 17 Plains Zebra populations, representing five of the six subspecies recognized by these authors.
    The study found very little differentiation among populations.

    In fact, populations across the entire species distribution range were less differentiated than Namibian populations of Hartmann’s Mountain Zebra.

    The five sampled Plains Zebra subspecies, which included the extinct Quagga, could not be distinguished with the genetic markers used and no genetic structuring was found indicative of distinct taxonomic units.


    The molecular data represented a genetic cline and was differentiated along an east-to-south gradient in agreement with the progressive increase in body size and reduction in stripes towards the south.

    This is consistent with the overlapping morphological parameters and geographical distribution of subspecies reported in literature.

    Hence, the subspecies splits based on the morphological cline may be arbitrary, but are useful from a management perspective.

    The same as was attempted with EC kudu but luckily it was not accepted,

    I suspect that the subspecies and current listing, will come under peer review in the not to distant future and that it will be stream lined.

    Regardless of the biological blunders of old, I must be honest I love hunting donkeys they're keen sense of smell, brilliant eye sight, and speed at which they move make them a challenging quarry to Perdue on foot.

    My best always
     
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  16. tarbe

    tarbe AH Elite

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    All zebra are beautiful to me, but wow! That Boehms is stunning!!

    Forget the spiral slam...I want a zebra slam! :)
     
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  17. tarbe

    tarbe AH Elite

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    My grand total experience of one ten-day safari tells me I agree with you Jaco.

    There is a reason I was happy to hunt and take 3 zebra on my recent trip. They are a blast to hunt. I almost think I could talk myself into going on a zebra only hunt!

    Ok, maybe not....but they are fun.
     
  18. Hank2211

    Hank2211 GOLD SUPPORTER AH Fanatic

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    If I only had the time to look up all the words here I don't understand . . . Starting with . . . infundibulem . . .
     
  19. TEX84

    TEX84 AH Member

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    Looks like Jaco's info came straight from here: http://www.iucnredlist.org/details/41013/0
     
  20. Hank2211

    Hank2211 GOLD SUPPORTER AH Fanatic

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    Jack must be as sneaky as you are well read. So do you think if we asked him - without his computer - what an infundibulem was he'd know?
     

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