Why not the Nosler Partition?

Discussion in 'Firearms & Ammunition' started by PHOENIX PHIL, Dec 26, 2012.

  1. gxsr-sarge

    gxsr-sarge AH Veteran

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2011
    Messages:
    114
    Likes Received:
    4
    Member of:
    NRA, SCI, DSC
    Hunted:
    US, Zimbabwe, RSA
    Not so much smelly, but very "musky". The PH's can smell them from quite a distance!
     
  2. Diamondhitch

    Diamondhitch AH Legend

    Joined:
    May 2, 2011
    Messages:
    2,371
    Likes Received:
    27
    My Photos:
    67
    Member of:
    SCI
    Hunted:
    Canada (AB, SK, NWT, BC) USA (NM, TX) South Africa (Limpopo, KZN, Free State, Eastern Cape, Northen Cape), Kyrgyzstan, Czech Republic
    Mine was smelly in June. My tracker actually tracked him like a hound dog, by scent. What really freaked me out was when he stopped and used his foot to scratch behind his ear! Ok maybe not but the Waterbuck was quite smelly.
     
  3. spike.t

    spike.t GOLD SUPPORTER AH Legend

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2010
    Messages:
    3,055
    Likes Received:
    165
    My Photos:
    131
    Member of:
    sci int, basc
    Hunted:
    zambia, tanzania, zimbabwe, hungary, france, england
    you can just about always smell the musky scent of waterbucks any time of the year if you are down wind or go through where they have recently been. just make sure when they are being skinned that the meat isnt touched by the outer hair side or by hands that have the oily musk on them or this will taint the meat, otherwise its fine to eat.
     
  4. bluey

    bluey GOLD SUPPORTER AH Legend

    Joined:
    May 21, 2012
    Messages:
    2,860
    Likes Received:
    217
    Location:
    38.12.23south 149.50.37 east
    My Photos:
    50
    Member of:
    ssaa, aba ,bairnsdale field archers
    Hunted:
    australia south africa (limpopo, north west,eastcape) canada (b.c)
    my water buck wasnt oily and never had much stink to him either .
    the next evening when young kody came into camp he was covered in oil and stunk to high heavens
    both these were toppled in may
    i had to go over to the skinning and see for myself that he wasnt having a lend of me
     
  5. buffybr

    buffybr AH Veteran

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2009
    Messages:
    133
    Likes Received:
    12
    My Photos:
    105
    Member of:
    SCI, RMEF, Life member NRA and Manhatten (Montana) Wildlife Association
    Hunted:
    USA(CO,MT,WY,AK,TX), Canada(NWT), Zim(Matetsi), RSA(Limpopo,KZN,Free State,Eastern Cape), New Zealand
    I've killed about twice as many elk (I think 21) with 180 gr Nosler Partitions as I've killed with all other bullets combined. I've killed most of my deer, pronghorn antelope, and mountain sheep with 117 gr Sierra GameKing bullets.

    On my first African hunt, I shot all my animals with 7mm Nosler Ballistic Tip bullets. That was a spur of the moment trip for me, and in the very limited time I had to work up a load, the Ballistic Tips were more accurate in my rifle than Partitions.

    A few years after my first African hunt, I found an accurate load for my 7mm Rem mag with 160 gr Accubonds and I used them on a Canadian caribou and muskox hunt (remember enysse?), and then for a half dozen antelope on another South African hunt.

    When I booked my Zimbabwe buffalo hunt I needed a larger rifle so I built a .375 RUM. With this new rifle I decided to try new bullets, and to eliminate the soft/solid dilemma, I decided to try the 300 gr TSX bullets. I got good accuracy in my rifle with these bullets, and in Africa, they performed very well on my buffalo and on several plains game animals.

    In 2007 I hunted the Eastern and Southern Cape regions of South Africa and decided to only take one rifle. Because I would be hunting eland and kudu, I took my .375 RUM with 270 gr TSX bullets which were also very accurate in my rifle. These TSX bullets performed very well on the 13 animals that I shot with them, and I believe on that trip I also made my closest ever (eland @ 30 yds) and longest ever (gemsbok @ 348 yds) one shot kills with a rifle.

    About 4 years ago I built a rifle that I had been dreaming about since the 70s, a .300 Weatherby. Because I had experienced good results with TSX bullets in my .375 RUM, I decided to try them in my new .300 Wby. Both 168 gr and 180 gr TSX bullets grouped sub moa in this rifle, and I decided to use the 168s on this rifle's maiden hunt for exotics in west Texas. I also used a 168 gr TSX that fall on a Montana bull elk and beside the almost instantaneous kill, the TSX bullet produced only a fraction of the amount of bloodshot tissue compared to the large amount of bloodshot tissue from the 180 gr Partitions on previous elk that I had shot.

    I had planned on taking my .300 Weatherby on my South African hunt last summer, and when I was loading shells for practice and to take on that trip, I ran out of 168 gr TSX bullets. I went to our local sporting goods store for more 168 gr TSX bullets, but all thay had were 168 gr TTSX bullets, so I bought 2 boxes of them. These TTSX bullets shot 3 shot one ragged hole groups in my rifle, so I decided to use them in Africa. These 168 gr TTSX bullets made virtually instantaneous one shot kills on the 5 animals that I shot with them including a baboon at 290 yds and a klipspringer at 314 yds.

    So the point of this reply is that I've used a variety of bullets, including Nosler Partitions, on a good number of North American and African game animals and basically what I have found is: If the bullet is designed for hunting, and it is accurate in my rifle, and I do my part and put it into an animals boiler room, I will put meat in the freezer and/or my taxidermist will keep busy.
     
  6. Scott CWO

    Scott CWO AH Member

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2013
    Messages:
    33
    Likes Received:
    0
    My Photos:
    2
    Member of:
    SCI, WSF, RMEF, GSCO, and NRA
    Hunted:
    Zimbabwe and Mozambique
    Thought I would chime in. Obviously it is always best to place a bullet correctly and to shoot bullets that your rifle will shoot well. Personally and overall, NP have grouped quite well in my rifles but I had trouble with Barnes and Hornady. I also have had great groups with Swift A-Frame, Remington Core-Lokt, Nosler Ballistic Tip, and Nosler Accubond. When Barnes came out with the banded TS bullets, the accuracy in my rifles with them became just as good as the other bullets.

    In my hunting and guiding, I have always looked to the combination of the best groups and the best performance on the specific type of game being hunted. I think the NP and the Ballistic Tip are fine for lighter skinned game and smaller bodied game. The NP had the benefit of one of the largest advertising campaigns ever seen in the shooting industry. They became popular as a result. The NP is designed for the tip to open up quickly and disintegrate while the core stays together and penetrates further. This is ok for smaller game but for larger and DG, I like a soft that expands while also retaining it's weight. This combo creates a larger wound channel throughout the whole path of the bullet through animal instead of just a big wound channel at the opening and then a smaller wound channel further along in the body cavity. I also trust a soft with better weight retention more if the shot isn't perfect and an animal is hit at a bad angle in heavier bone. I have seen NP that did not perform well in this circumstance and that is why some elk guides, AK Brown Bear guides, and some PH's don't care for the NP. I am one of them for larger game. Most of the time they will do okay but the few times when they don't can cost you a lot of money for a wounded animal or worse. When there are other choices that group just as well, why take even a slight risk? I like to eliminate as many risks as possible when hunting/guiding. If the Swift A-Frame, Barnes TS, Accubond, or Remington Core-Lokt group as well, why not go with them instead?

    I know guys have said and will continue to say that they have shot "X" amount of bigger game with them and did not have a problem with the NP. Congrats on that. But I guide about 21 weeks/trips per year and I have seen the problems first-hand. Just my opinion.




     

Share This Page