Vanishing Wildlife Corridors in Tanzania

Discussion in 'Hunting Africa' started by AFRICAN INDABA, May 10, 2013.

  1. AFRICAN INDABA

    AFRICAN INDABA CONTRIBUTOR AH Enthusiast

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    Vanishing Wildlife Corridors in Tanzania

    One of the biggest challenges for big African wildlife like lions, elephants, and buffalo is movement across native habitat that is increasingly being encroached on by humans. Vanishing Wildlife Corridors in Tanzania are the subject of a new study released in 2012 by a group of researchers. Find attached the complete text Vanishing wildlife corridors and options for restoration: a case study from Tanzania. Tropical Conservation Science Vol. 5(4):463-474.

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  2. AFRICAN INDABA

    AFRICAN INDABA CONTRIBUTOR AH Enthusiast

    Joined:
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    My Photos:
    70
    Member of:
    CIC, Rowland Ward, B&C, DSC, German Hunting Association, KZN Hunting Association, Wild Sheep Foundation
    Hunted:
    Western US, Western Canada, Alaska, Colombia, Tajikistan, Russian Federation, China, Iran, Austria, Germany, Spain, Czech Republic, UK, Indonesia, South Africa, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Congo, Tanzania, Uganda, Botswana, Namibia
    The western side of the Serengeti has higher levels of illegal hunting because of the increased human population density. Researcher estimate (see mongabay.com's open-access Tropical Conversation Science) that 52,000 to 60,000 illegal hunters presently live within 45 km west of the Greater Serengeti Ecosystem. Poachers use wire snares to target large herbivores, but unselective harvesting is prevalent and many carnivores such as lions and leopards are killed; pit traps, dogs, spotlighting, and bow and arrows are also used. Poverty seems to be the driving force and as human population densities continue to grow, it is unlikely that poaching will subside, if no alternatives are offered.

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