Tough Bullet?

Discussion in '.375 & Up' started by High Desert Hunter, Mar 6, 2014.

  1. High Desert Hunter

    High Desert Hunter AH Member

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2014
    Messages:
    49
    Likes Received:
    1
    I went out shooting last weekend, and took my 375 Ruger in addition to some handguns. For the Ruger, I was shooting at an old well pump housing, 1/16" steel, then 1/4" of aluminum with a bunch of gears and a circuit card inside. The Hornady 300gr FMJ punched right through, and then approximately 21" into the dirt berm behind the target, not loose dirt either. This was from 28 yards, I was trying to shoot 3 times as quickly as I could and keep them all centered on this 14"x16" target. IMG_0802.jpg
    There is one unfired bullet for comparison. I am wondering if anyone has ever used this bullet in Africa, and if so, how did they perform?

    Dave
     
  2. BRICKBURN

    BRICKBURN SUPER MODERATOR CONTRIBUTOR GOLD BENEFACTOR AH Ambassador

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2010
    Messages:
    6,999
    Likes Received:
    145
    My Photos:
    396
    Member of:
    KZN Hunters Assoc
    Hunted:
    Namibia, South Africa, Botswana, Canada, USA, Mexico
    Since I'm clueless; how are FMJ's different than solids?
     
  3. enysse

    enysse AH Ambassador

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2009
    Messages:
    5,919
    Likes Received:
    103
    My Photos:
    32
    Member of:
    Northeast Wisconsin SCI chapter, Lifetime member of NRA,RMEF
    Hunted:
    Namibia, South Africa (East Cape, Guateng and Limpopo)
    Well I think 20 years ago a lot people used them as their solid load for Cape buffalo and elephant hunting. The solids today are more stronger metal and design, they don't change coarse after hitting bone. And they don't deform, you can practically reload them again in some cases.
     
  4. High Desert Hunter

    High Desert Hunter AH Member

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2014
    Messages:
    49
    Likes Received:
    1
    Thanks! They definitely aren't solids, but I was surprised at how tough these appear to be. I prefer a flat nose for better straight line penetration, but these are inexpensive trigger time bullets.
     
  5. sestoppelman

    sestoppelman SILVER SUPPORTER AH Legend

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2010
    Messages:
    2,433
    Likes Received:
    46
    My Photos:
    68
    Member of:
    NRA, NA Hunt Club
    Hunted:
    Tanzania, Botswana, Zimbabwe (2), Namibia, South Africa (2)
    Yes, they are solids. I used the same brand bullet to take my 2nd buffalo (1990) with one shot, bang flop! It was a copper and steel jacket over lead. They are not monolithic solids, one metal, but they are still a solid, same as a FMJ, full metal jacket.
     
  6. High Desert Hunter

    High Desert Hunter AH Member

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2014
    Messages:
    49
    Likes Received:
    1
  7. sestoppelman

    sestoppelman SILVER SUPPORTER AH Legend

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2010
    Messages:
    2,433
    Likes Received:
    46
    My Photos:
    68
    Member of:
    NRA, NA Hunt Club
    Hunted:
    Tanzania, Botswana, Zimbabwe (2), Namibia, South Africa (2)
    Hi Dave, I know the bullet you mean. Mine were the older steel jacket ones, like the "new" ones I guess. Either way, if its full jacketed, its a solid regardless whether there is steel or not. In the old days, before mono bullets, that is what FMJ lead core bullets were called by everyone, a solid.
     
  8. enysse

    enysse AH Ambassador

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2009
    Messages:
    5,919
    Likes Received:
    103
    My Photos:
    32
    Member of:
    Northeast Wisconsin SCI chapter, Lifetime member of NRA,RMEF
    Hunted:
    Namibia, South Africa (East Cape, Guateng and Limpopo)
    It wasn't until Barnes got into business that the whole solid bullet line changed to what you have today. Back in the day, FMJ was a solid....and the usual load for tough game shots.
     
  9. High Desert Hunter

    High Desert Hunter AH Member

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2014
    Messages:
    49
    Likes Received:
    1
    Got it! I was thinking of the monolithic solids. Even without a steel jacket, I am surprised at how tough these are. I am going to have to buy a box of the new style Hornady solids one of these days and do some non-scientific comparison testing. Thank you guys for the replies, I really appreciate them.
     

Share This Page