The last true wild hunting experience in Arica

Discussion in 'Hunting Africa' started by Spiral Horn Safaris, Jul 14, 2009.

  1. Spiral Horn Safaris

    Spiral Horn Safaris AH Fanatic

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    Hi there everyone I was just thinking were are there still some real wild hunts left in Africa? I was hunting in Zambia for 9 months last year and must say this is truly one of the last wild places left in Africa not to say that hunting South Africa or Namibia is not wild but Zambia is really another world.

    But it is expensive and defiantly not for someone who is use to sleeping in on a Safari this is hard work folks. We hunted in a area near west Petauke the areas there are massive and the Luangwa river is defiantly a sight to see, not because of its size but due to the fact that it is what all animal life in the area revolves around. There is such a diversity in habitat from the river thickets (matete thickets) to the sloping hills with the huge mopanie trees. This is a place where every morning when you go out on a hunt you just don't know what's going to happen or what you are going to hunt for the day if you come across fresh Cape Buffalo track's then Buffalo it will be for the day and there are some real big herds there maybe 350 plus. We got charged by elephant on a daily basis witch always managed to get that morning sleepyhead fully awake. Traveling from baits or along the river it was not unusual to see leopard in broad day light. I once saw two swimming thought the Luangwa river witch I thought was pretty amazing, to see and this in broad day light?

    The main reason way I think Zambia is so special is because of the fact that there are no fences and don't get me wrong sometimes I wished we had some so we can catch up to that herd of buffalo, but as I said no fences make the hunts there so true to what we read about in all of these books by Peter Capstick's and Bell not saying that everything they wrote was true, but that you will realize once you hunt Zambia.

    But all in all I think Zambia is one of those true wild spots left on earth for us to really experience what hunting is really about and see a place that has not changed for at least the last hundred years. The only down side is the poaching of animals such as Elephant I saw two die in my time there both where wounded by poachers and we had to watch them die because we are not allowed to kill it because of laws in Zambia pretty inhumane law i think.

    Hope this makes for some good reading and that we can share our opinions about true wild hunts and how many places there are still left in this world.
  2. billrquimby

    billrquimby AH Veteran

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    Although I have not hunted them, I would think that many West African countries, such as Liberia, Cameroon, Ghana or Burkina Faso, plus Sudan, C.A.R. and Uganda would be "wilder" than Zambia. I've not been to Zambia's Luangwa region, either, so I can't comment on it, but I did hunt its Kafue/Mumbwa region in 1994 and 1998. We saw buffalo and elephants daily, and walked into the middle of another pride of lions after I'd shot one. There was leopard sign everywhere, but we did not see one on either trip (I have seen them in daylight while hunting in Zimbabwe and Natal, though.) It was much more primitive than the places I've visited in Namibia, Botswana and South Africa, but it was far from a wilderness experience as we know it in North America. At no time were we ever very far from roads or other humans. There were signs of past human activity everywhere.

    Bill Quimby
  3. Spiral Horn Safaris

    Spiral Horn Safaris AH Fanatic

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    Got to say until you haven't hunted the Luangwa Vally in Zambia you won't know what is truly wild I came across some locals there who have never seen a white person before that is pretty strange in the world we life in today. But I am sure there are some other wild spots in Africa as well I heard a lot of good things about the hunting in Congo but a bit dangerous for may taste.
  4. enysse

    enysse AH Ambassador

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    Nice to see a report on Zambia. I think it has to be incredible place to hunt. I have studied the animals available and have read a lot of hunting reports on the country. The one thing that interests me is the sable, roan and lechwe hunting! Yes, there is the big 5 but it also has fabulous antelope hunting!
  5. Spiral Horn Safaris

    Spiral Horn Safaris AH Fanatic

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    Yes you are 100% right there are some really special Roan, Sable and Lechwe the Outfit that I worked for averaged 28" on Roan and we shot a 45" Sable last year as well.
  6. Shavesgreen

    Shavesgreen AH Senior Member

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    My contact in Zambia has already taken a 46" sable this season and expects to take a 48/49 next season! I have some pictures of this years beast but not sure how to post them?

    Charly
  7. Spiral Horn Safaris

    Spiral Horn Safaris AH Fanatic

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    Wow thats pretty big must be Giant sable blood line? Where does your contact hunt in Zambia?
    Pretty special place have you been there?
  8. Shavesgreen

    Shavesgreen AH Senior Member

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    Phil`s game farm is about four miles past Lusaka airport on the Great East Rd. He also hunts the West Petauke GMA. My parents have been out there for the past 10 years as mission workers.
  9. AfricaHunting.com

    AfricaHunting.com FOUNDER AH Ambassador

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  10. Shavesgreen

    Shavesgreen AH Senior Member

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    Thanks Jerome,

    Hopefully it will appear!
    [​IMG]

    Attached Files:

  11. Spiral Horn Safaris

    Spiral Horn Safaris AH Fanatic

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    Very good sable Zambia the land of opportunity.Tank you for the the photo.
  12. TOM

    TOM AH Elite

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    Africa...are there other continents to hunt?
    Those are magnificent animals. Someday.
  13. Skyline

    Skyline AH Fanatic

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    That makes two pictures of exceptional Zambian sable I have seen in the last few days. One of Africa's most beautiful antelope.

    Thanks for posting the picture!
  14. Wendell Reich

    Wendell Reich New Member

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    Like Bill Quimby said, West & Central Africa has some truly wild places. Zambia, Tanzania, Mozambique also have some extremely remote hunting areas.

    Even in Namibia there are some areas that are relatively untouched by the progress of man. Yes, you can access it with a vehicle within 6-10 hours of Windhoek, but there are some areas where Elephant, Lion, Leopard roam that is still wild Africa. Not as remote as some of the areas mentioned, but still, surprisingly wild for a country as developed as Namibia.
  15. Shallom

    Shallom AH Enthusiast

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    All good locations mentioned and very true of most... but these wild places are becoming rare. Having first hand experience in Tanzania - the hunting concessions are pretty much wild, but known. The country still has a few 'gems' where no outfitter is running operations but wildlife roams free and is only pursued by trappers and poachers. These areas remain only in the south and west of the country - as wild as it gets! No access for half of the year due to road conditions says enough to start with :)
  16. Spiral Horn Safaris

    Spiral Horn Safaris AH Fanatic

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    I must say Tanzania is a place that I would love to see but haven't been there yet. We have the same problem with the roads in the South Luangwa so I expect it to go toe to toe with the area you are describing.

    But never the less it is great to hear that there are more than one wild place still left in this world and I personally think we should try and keep it this way for our kids sake so they may also have the opportunity to experience it one day.

    Hunting in a place as wild as that was truly one of the best experiences I have ever had and If it were possible I would have liked to give everyone the same opportunity so they can experience I for them self’s.

    Thanks to all you guys who read and comment on this topic it is something very close to my heart.
  17. Skyline

    Skyline AH Fanatic

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    I dearly love wild places. I would rather spend two weeks hunting hard in a truly remote wilderness area and go home with only a couple of representative trophies than spend the time in a more civilized location and shoot a whole wall full of animals. But as everyone knows, those places are becoming few and far between.

    There are common causes to the demise of wilderness and it matters not whether it is the dark continent or the sub-arctic, the story is the same. Constant population growth on its own takes a big toll as the burgeoning numbers need a place to live.............but their needs, like tendrils from a noxious weed, invade the most remote corners of the globe in search of natural resources. Food is certainly an issue, but lumber extraction and the exploration and extraction of gold, diamonds, oil, gas and other minerals create tens of thousands of km's of roads into once pristine areas every year. Access is the number one enemy of wilderness areas..................with it comes all of the negatives of mankind.

    SHS, I could not agree more, we need to preserve more of these areas. Sadly it seems that in my life time I have witnessed the end to hunting for such incredible trophies as the various sub-species of tiger, jaguar and possibly free ranging wild African lions..........although I hope that can still be averted. I am also seeing some disturbing changes in how wilderness areas and sanctuaries are viewed by both the government and the unwashed masses.

    At one point in time we viewed national wildlife refuges and wilderness areas as places that were set aside to remain in their natural wild state, free from logging and mineral extraction for perpetuity. Now circumstances have changed and the urban majority are so far removed from the land that a forested area with paved highways is considered 'wilderness' and governments now consider changing the rules to suit their needs. Now it seems that the current global political climate and the domestic and international thirst for oil, gas and other key natural resources has changed the perception of what is 'allowable' in wildlife sanctuaries and wilderness areas.

    As a species it seems we never learn, that we do not look to the past to avoid future mistakes. Every generation has made blunders that future generations had to clean up or live with, but the blunders we are making these days are incredibly pervasive and will have significant long term consequences for future generations......for the planet itself.

    It has never been more important for hunters, the original and true conservationists, to make their voices heard and do their utmost to influence the choices that are being made. Sadly, hunters have changed with the times as well and the majority do not actively lobby for wild places and the animals that inhabit them. In any given population fewer than 5% of hunters and anglers actually belong to local fish and game organizations, national or international conservation groups or pro-gun organizations.

    I have been to more meetings and round table discussions over logging access, mineral exploration and other land use issues than I care to remember. The locations and the specific issues may change but there have always been some constants. Generally big business gets their way and the resource extraction goes ahead, and those of us who fought for restricted access and the removal of roads and trails following extraction found ourselves fighting fellow hunters who viewed the easy access created by these roads as a benefit.

    Hunters need to get off their collective duffs and start getting involved. We all need to quit being complacent and expecting the same few bodies, the 5%, to fight the good fight. The 5% is wearing out and running out of steam.........they need more than moral support.
  18. billrquimby

    billrquimby AH Veteran

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    Skyline:

    The loss of the ability to hunt a species does not always equate to threatened populations or loss of habitat. The reason tiger hunting was closed was a political one in the beginning.

    Same with the jaguar. There may or may not be enough tigers remaining to allow limited, tightly regulated hunting, but there should be no question about the jaguar. Plenty of jaguars and jaguar habitat still remain from the U.S. border to the Mato Grasso. Individuals still are crossing into Arizona and New Mexico and roaming places that in no way can be called "wilderness."

    If the greenies hadn't gained such a foothold in countries with jaguars, we still could be hunting jaguars today.

    Although it may be illegal, ranchers in jaguar range still shoot, shovel, and shut up when jaguars threaten their cattle. If it were not politically incorrect, international sport hunters would be taking these cats and leaving money needed in jaguar conservation.

    Incidentally, my views of wilderness are different from many, including some on this forum. To me it means "no sign of man at all," which rules out the majority of North America except the Far North. The presence of any road, developed landing strip or resident indigenous people disqualifies an area.

    Bill Quimby
  19. enysse

    enysse AH Ambassador

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    I think Skyline and billrquimby are very correct. The greenies have brainwashed the general public into stopping hunting of the polar bear, jaguar, cheetah and a whole lot of other game.

    Politicians and greedy business's have convinced the general public that mineral extraction and wilderness can go hand in hand....because they have the technology to do the natural resource extraction without harming the environment. This stinks no matter how you sell the "the stupid idea" in the first place. They tell the public they will keep oil or whatever down in price...when they should tell you all the millions they will be pocketing in the whole process.

    The whole "wolf situation in the U.S." is really wearing me thin!!! We were pushed into introducing wolfs...but we can't manage them. The greenies keep slamming the courts with lawsuits. Meanwhile the wolfs keep eating the elk, deer, moose, farm animals and household pets into the thousands every year. Yet, all the oil work has wrecked a lot of mule deer and antelope habitat and everyone collectively does nothing.

    I think hunters do give-up and say what are you going to do. Sad indeed. Thanks to the new economy more people are worried about their 401K than anything else.

    I always wished I'd been born 30 years earlier..so I could have seen the great mule deer day of western U.S. in the 60's and all the great hunting in Kenya, Sudan, etc. I sure would have liked to have seen the Giant Sable of Angola. The days of the wild are disappearing!


  20. Skyline

    Skyline AH Fanatic

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    Bill..............we have similar views about wilderness..........I guess that is why I like the far north.;)

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