The future of hunting in Africa!

Discussion in 'Hunting Africa' started by Leeukop Safaris, Feb 23, 2010.

  1. Leeukop Safaris

    Leeukop Safaris AH Veteran

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    There are a few factors that may have a big influence on the future of hunting in Africa. But I would like to discuss two issues that concern me the most.

    I would like to start by saying that the future of what we as hunters live for lies in the hands of the hunter himself. Yes we are all human and different individuals with different ideas and ways of doing things. A certainty is when it comes to hunting us all having one thing in common and that is to protect the legacy of hunting and wildlife.

    The fact that hunting became a healthy business operation in Africa saved the wild land habitats where animals live in. Without these habitats wild animal populations can not exist! This is something the animal rights movement do not understand and apart from themselves this is the biggest thread to the future of hunting and wildlife in Africa. Ban hunting and these natural habitats will develop into agricultural land or even worse, a mining company will come and turn these habitats upside down.

    Secondly we as hunters must be careful of how we do things and the way of exposing hunts that is captured on cameras and DVD’s. Do not give the animal rights movement ammunition against us. We can become our own enemy’s without knowing it.

    We must stop throwing accusations to each other and stand together as one big family. Threw ethical hunting and sustainable utilisation we can make a big difference.
     
  2. Spiral Horn Safaris

    Spiral Horn Safaris AH Fanatic

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    Hi Neil

    I think that you have made out some good points here.
    Neil I do not think that too many people actually take in to consideration the fact that development will be the worst thing in the world with modern time trends of bigger is better coming trough on a daily basis we are becoming our own worst enemy.

    Education is what should be the most important focus point when it comes to the future of hunting the biggest problem that I have with all that is happening in the world today is that we as humans tend to judge something before we have tried or even researched it. Now in saying research something I feel that one has to practically do it and not read books where you can just copy some other guy’s opinion you basically have to do it yourself and form your own conclusions.

    Most of the anti hunting folk just grow up with the perception that hunting is bad but have never been on a hunt and thus just get up every day and form the same conclusions but they will defiantly be to unsure or scared to try it.

    We should focus on the youth of today they are the future and if we can get them interested in the outdoors weather it is fishing or hunting we have achieved success so much of today’s society depends on the media and I personally feel the it is right there where the US are one ahead of most other countries.

    If you take the amount of young people who watch MTV and those reality programs and we can just turn their heads to educational hunting shows we might stand a chance in reaching out to them. I have seen some good shows on TV on my visits to the US and I have seen some bad ones as well but all and all it is still exposure and put out in to the world to get people involved weather they only want to deliver criticism or take part in building up a heritage we are making people aware.

    As you said we should focus on producing good shows and DVD’s and it would do a lot of good it these programs were educational to a large extent but then again you have to physically get out there and do the hard yards as well.

    With the games of today like X box and WII some kids might get the wrong idea yes hunting is about taking an animal but there is a lot more to it than just shooting. It is our job as hunters to educate the future generations to take them out in to the wilderness and show them how to hunt but most importantly share that knowledge that we have to ensure good hunting ethics and a firm understanding of what nature is and as most of us know she can be kind and unpredictable as well as harsh at the same time.

    I don’t want to go about telling people how to raise their kids but it will sure be great if we can go out and lead by example.

    Let’s stand together and stop judging a book by its cover then we will have a future as hunters.:D

    Cheers Louis
     
  3. Big5

    Big5 AH Enthusiast

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    You made some great points Neil.
    .
     
  4. PAGuardian

    PAGuardian AH Member

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    Louis,

    Great post! The biggest factor in declining interest in hunting is a lack of education. I'm a young guy and I see it all the time; most people my age would prefer to play a video game or read some internet blog than have to work for something. Today's society loves instant gratification: they want the best results and they want them now. Hunting doesn't work that way (thank God). I've been through a lot of schooling (in medical school right now) and I can say without a doubt that Mother Nature is the best "life-teacher" available. Education is the foundation and the means for hunter numbers to grow.

    As for the perception of hunters by non and anti-hunters, a few bad eggs ruin it for the rest of us. Most have no idea what respect and admiration we have for the animals we pursue. Many think our passion for hunting is egotistical and/or malicious which could not be further from the truth. In our current society, if hunters were not around to place value (both monetary and subjective) on wildlife there would be none left!
     
  5. Alaska Hunter

    Alaska Hunter AH Member

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    non-hunting companions

    Another great way to expose non-hunters to what the wilds have to offer is to take them on a hunt. This might be your wife,son,daughter, nephew, friend, etc.. As outfitters we can help this by lowering our non-hunter rate. Does it really cost $175- $250 a day to feed and shelter the non-hunter? My father-in-law has been guiding in Alaska for nearly 50 years and makes it a point to allow hunters to bring one non-hunting companion for free!! He believes that this helps to promote hunting and ensures a future for the sport we all love so much. Just a thought.
     
  6. monish

    monish AH Elite

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    Neil , its a real heartfelt point ,I live far-off in India but Africa has been close to my heart the hunting and its annihilation in Africa sounds scary !!!

    Monish
     
  7. monish

    monish AH Elite

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    Louis, what you write is correct , the world is changing but we have to change the world of hunting not only in Africa but everywhere if you have a compassion for this SPORT.

    Monish
     
  8. enysse

    enysse AH Ambassador

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    I agree with everyone above. I have been on this website a long time and always advocate education and wildlife conservation. Educating the youth of today before the media brainwashes them into mindless souls is the first step. Letting people know all the benefits of hunting is the first good step! Hunting does promote healthy wildlife populations, slows down development, creates economic employment and does promote environmental stewardship of the land.
     
  9. monish

    monish AH Elite

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    Alaska Hunter ! a real great thought to educate the non hunters to make them realize the essence of this sport.

    Monish
     
  10. Leeukop Safaris

    Leeukop Safaris AH Veteran

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    Enysse, I agree with you 100% and thank you for all your positive inputs on this site.
     
  11. Leeukop Safaris

    Leeukop Safaris AH Veteran

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    Hi Louis,

    I can not agree with you more. We should focus on the youth because they are the people that will take over where we left it.
     
  12. ThomasBeaham

    ThomasBeaham BRONZE SUPPORTER AH Enthusiast

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    I also agree. I thought I would post 2 of my favorite quotes in regard to an outdoor education.

    "A man never stands so tall as when he stoops to help a child fish"-Jim Porter

    "Be sure to take a boy fishing, not once a year,but several times. It's an experience you will never forget. Tell him about fishing. Teach him sportsmanship; tell him about conservation. Show him, by example,how he should conduct himself while in the out-of-doors"-Joe Brooks
     
  13. Skyline

    Skyline AH Fanatic

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    Well I agree with much of what has been posted on here. Certainly the salvation of hunting in the future, if it can be accomplished, will be through education and by introducing our youth to the outdoors.

    I wonder though, just what sort of a message are we sending? Take a good hard look at many of the things that are being promoted by the actions of hunters and by the programs televised on the various outdoor channels. Not what they say, but what we/they are actually doing.

    Do phrases like "no kill, no pay", "7 animals in 7 days", "all our trophies make SCI silver and gold medal" ring a bell? How about TV programs that have teams competing on bear hunts or deer hunts, whacking and stacking them with team photos next to pick-up trucks with carcasses stacked in the back.

    Others compete for a never ending list of 'slams' and 'world hunting awards'. We have young hunter awards that go to children who just happened to be born into a family with more money than god and who can campaign their kids around the globe killing the big 5 and other glamor species that most of us do not have a hope or a prayer of ever hunting, barring a big win in the lottery.

    I don't know, but I see a lot of mixed signals out there. As hunters many of us preach one thing while we practice another. As a whole hunters today seem to be far more concerned about size, success rates, quantity and it all happening quickly so they can get back to the old salt mine.

    Our kids are raised differently now. Take school and clubs like 4H. Gone are the days when the kids competed and only the winners got ribbons. Now every kid gets a ribbon so that they won't feel bad and have some sort of identity crisis.

    Call me a pessimist, but I do not harbor unrealistic hopes for the future. I won't even get into the fact that we continue to base our global economy on growth and our populations continue to increase in leaps and bounds. All of these warm bodies have to live some where, they all have to eat and the food and the materials to sustain the population all has to be produced or harvested somewhere.

    The future of hunting? Well I think there will be hunting, but it will be only a fraction of what there is now and for a variety of reasons.
     
  14. PAGuardian

    PAGuardian AH Member

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    Examples like these are how hunters "shoot themselves in the foot". Success is measured differently in today's society; if you don't have something physical or material to show for it then it is unsuccessful in today's world. This becomes worse when money is involved. A lot of hunters who pay to go on guided trips will be the nicest guys in camp the first day but if they aren't "successful" as the hunt winds down....look out!

    Skyline, you aren't being pessimistic. It is just the sad truth about the direction our society is heading.
     
  15. Erik

    Erik New Member

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    This is a really good reflection, I think. Great post.
     
  16. Big5

    Big5 AH Enthusiast

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    Kelly, thanks for a truly insightful post. And I certainly don't think you're being at all pessimistic.
    .
     
  17. Billy Stewart

    Billy Stewart AH Senior Member

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    Niel,

    Very good post and i cant agree with you more! We as hunters have been under attack for many years and it will continue we all know that! We have to be very careful of the image we put out there to the general public but also to each other.
    On this forum there has been a healthy debate about paying by the inch and some talk about fences with good points made by all, here is the bottom line. If you don't like the pay by the inch system don't hunt with that outfitter, i personally do not like it but it is there and its going to stay.
    Fences well they are a fact of life and we better get used to it. Do i agree with putting an animal in a small pen cornering him and shooting notice i said shooting not hunting that animal no of course not. But if it is a large enough area for the animal to elude the hunter i don't have a problem with it.
    These are my personnel opinions and i am not try to step on any ones toes just saying there is good and bad to all sides of these issues. And we as hunters need to find middle grounds with each other on some of these issues. I have seen these two subjects talked about on other forums and get really heated and out of hand.
    Respect for each other and for the animals we hunt. The hunt is not all about inches or fences its the friends made, the drive to the hunting area and the conversation and excitement leading up to a mornings hunt. Its setting foot on Africa for the first time [which i have not done yet] and thinking holly shit i am finally here. Its the ride back to camp with the guys who have shared all of this with you and telling lies i mean stories of the days hunt if there is an animal in the back or not.
    Louis your point on young people is so true. Get those young ones out there and teach them what hunting is before someone else influences them. My son made me very proud this year he shoot some meat deer early in the season. But on the last weekend early saturday morning a huge 10 point i had seen came in he is an awesome whitetail. Every time he would stop or i would stop him there was brush a trees or something in the way.
    He stayed on the edge and just would not come into a more open area.
    I think my son who is 14 could have made the shoot but he didn't take any of them. When the deer dropped out of site He looked at me and said dad i didn't want to wound him i just didn't have a clear shoot sorry.
    That is one of the memories i will always have with me! I could not have been prouder of him!
    Sorry for rambling on have a good on guys.

    Billy :D
     
  18. Leeukop Safaris

    Leeukop Safaris AH Veteran

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    Hi Billy,

    Thank you for your inputs and I agree with you totally on the high fence and hunting per inch situation.

    I would much rather fight for the legacy of hunting against the anti hunters (Tree huggers) than to argue about fences and inches among my fellow hunter friends.
     

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