"THE EMPEROR" .375 H&H Magnum

Discussion in '.375 & Up' started by monish, Aug 22, 2010.

  1. monish

    monish AH Elite

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    "THE EMPEROR" .375 H&H Magnum

    The .375 Holland & Holland Magnum is a powerful rifle round and one of the best-known medium-bore cartridges in the world. A truly classic cartridge, the .375 H&H was only the second cartridge ever to feature a belt, now common among magnum rounds. The belt is for headspace as the case has a rather narrow shoulder. It was introduced by the British company Holland & Holland in 1912 as the .375 Belted Rimless Nitro-Express. It initially used cordite propellant which was made in long strands - hence the tapered shape of this cartridge, which was also to ensure smooth chambering and extraction from a rifle's breech.

    The .375 H&H is often cited as one of the most useful all-round rifle cartridges, especially where large and dangerous game occurs] With relatively light bullets in the region of 235 to 270 grains (15 to 17 g), it is a flat-shooting, fairly long-range cartridge ideal for use on light to medium game. With heavy bullets of 300 grain (19 g) and greater, it has the punch necessary for large, thick-skinned dangerous game. In many regions with thick-skinned dangerous game animals, the .375 H&H is seen as the sensible minimum acceptable caliber, and in many places (in Africa, primarily) it is now the legal minimum for hunting such game. African game guides, professional hunters, and dangerous game cullers have repeatedly voted the .375 H&H as their clear preference for an all-round caliber, if they could only have one rifle. A similar preference has been expressed by Alaska game guides for brown and polar bear country.

    Unlike what is seen in most calibers, many .375 H&H rifles also achieve nearly the same point of impact over a wide range of bullet weights at all commonly used distances] further simplifying a professional hunter's choice in selecting different grain bullets based upon the game hunted, without requiring significant scope or sight adjustments, which further serves to popularize the .375 H&H Magnum among professional hunters (PHs).

    .375 H&H cartridge specification
    • Bullet diameter: .375 in (9.55 mm)
    • Maximum case length: 2.850 in (72.39 mm)
    • Trim-to length: 2.840 in (72.14 mm)
    • Maximum cartridge length: 3.600 in (91.44 mm)
    • Shoulder angle: 15 degrees
    • Industry maximum pressure: 53,000 CUP (Copper units of pressure)
    • SAAMI maximum pressure: 62,000 lbf/in² (430 MPa)
    • Case capacity: 96.3 grains (6.24 g) of water

    A typical factory load will launch a 270 grain (17 g) spitzer bullet at 2,690 ft/s (820 m/s) with 4,337 ft•lbf. (5880 J) of energy at the muzzle. This load has approximately the same trajectory as the 180-grain (12 g) bullet from a .30-06 Springfield.

    There are a great number of rifles (and even a few handguns) chambered for the .375 H&H. Many types of actions are used, including single-shots, double-rifles, and bolt actions. When hunting dangerous game, a double-rifle or a controlled-feed bolt action rifle is most commonly recommended, as a quick follow-up shot may be necessary, and reliability of the firearm becomes of paramount importance.

    The 9.3x64mm Brenneke cartridge is probably the closest European continental ballistic twin of the .375 Holland & Holland Magnum. When compared to the .375 Holland & Holland Magnum the 9.3x64mm Brenneke has a slightly smaller caliber and it is a rimless cartridge. The 9.3 X 64 does not have the time trusted conical cartridge case of the 375 H&H and will never be as reliable in the field. Extraction of the cartridge is vital when faced with dangerous game. A split cylindrical cartridge will jam. For non dangerous game the 9.3 X 64 is a wonderful weapon and as it has a relatively short case it may be used with interchangeable barrels such as the 7.62 X63 ( 30-06 ) or the 7 X 64 brenneke or together with the 7 X 57 Mauser ( 275 Rigby).

    The belted magnum case
    The distinctive belted case of this cartridge was patented in Britain on 31 March 1891 by G. Roth of Austria. The first commercial use of the patent was in 1907 for the .375 Holland-Schoenauer cartridge for a Mannlicher-Schoenauer bolt-action rifle marketed by Holland & Holland. The .375 H&H used an improved belted case shared with the .275 H&H Magnum when they were introduced together in August, 1912.[1] This second belted case design was later used with the .300 H&H Magnum, and has been modified as the basis for "Magnum" cartridges developed by other arms manufacturers. Weatherby used the case as the basis for their .257, .270, 7 mm, .300, .340, and .375 Weatherby Magnum cartridges. Norma Projektilfabrik A/S shortened the case as the basis for their .308 and .358 Norma Magnum cartridges. Winchester Repeating Arms Company used similarly shortened cases for their .264, .300, .338, and .458 Winchester Magnum cartridges. Remington Arms used the case for their 6.5 mm, 7 mm, 8 mm, and .350 Remington Magnum cartridges.

    Type rifle
    • Place of origin: United Kingdom
    • Designer: Holland & Holland
    • Designed: 1912
    • Produced: 1912 - present

    Specifications
    • Bullet diameter: .375 in (9.5 mm)
    • Neck diameter: .404 in (10.3 mm)
    • Shoulder diameter: .448 in (11.4 mm)
    • Base diameter: .513 in (13.0 mm)
    • Rim diameter: .532 in (13.5 mm)
    • Rim thickness: .220 in (5.6 mm)
    • Case length: 2.850 in (72.4 mm)
    • Overall length: 3.6 in (91 mm)
    • Primer type
    • Large rifle magnum

    Ballistic performance
    Bullet weight/type - Velocity - Energy
    • 200 gr (13 g) JFP - 3,195 ft/s (974 m/s) - 4,534 ft•lbf (6,147 J)
    • 235 gr (15.2 g) SP - 2,964 ft/s (903 m/s) - 4,585 ft•lbf (6,216 J)
    • 250 gr (16 g) SP - 2,835 ft/s (864 m/s) - 4,463 ft•lbf (6,051 J)
    • 270 gr (17 g) FS - 2,694 ft/s (821 m/s) - 4,352 ft•lbf (5,901 J)
    • 300 gr (19 g) SPBT - 2,645 ft/s (806 m/s) - 4,661 ft•lbf (6,319 J)


    Monish
     

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  2. Shavesgreen

    Shavesgreen AH Senior Member

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    Hi Monish,

    Very interesting info on this calibre. Do you have any idea of the trajectory when using the lighter projectiles listed? I use 270 grn in mine but wonder if I can use a 235 grn head for longer shots out to say 400 yards max?

    Charly
     
  3. monish

    monish AH Elite

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    Charly,

    To my knowledge, Speer makes one of the only 235-grain .375 caliber bullets on the market. The 235-grain bullet was one of Holland & Holland's original offerings back in 1912. Today, this bullet is excellent for deer and other game of similar size and damage to edible meat is much to be less than that caused by smaller, higher velocity bullets!

    Zero @ 231 yards = Maximum Point Blank Range (MPBR) of 269 yards for a 6" target diameter. Recoil velocity for this load is 16.5 fps, and the recoil energy is 38.2 foot-pounds.

    Range (yds.) * 0 100 * 200 * 300 * 400 * 500

    Path (in.) * -1.5 * 2.7 * 1.6 * -6.1 * -22.1 * -49.3

    Velocity (fps) * 2850 * 2563 * 2294 * 2041 * 1805 * 1591

    Energy (ft.-lbs.) * 4238 * 3428 * 2746 * 2174 * 1700 * 1321

    Time of Flight (s.) * 0 * 0.111 * 0.235 * 0.374 * 0.529 * 0.707

    Path Adjust (clicks @ 1/4 MOA per click) * 0 * -10 * -3 * +8 * +21 * +38

    Distance from Aim (in.) * 0 * 2.7 * 1.6 * 6.1 * 22.1 * 49.3

    IPSC Power * 670 * 602 * 539 * 480 * 424 * 374

    Hatcher's Power * 328444 * 295407 * 264369 * 235254 * 208053 * 183365

    Taylor's Knockdown * 35.88 * 32.27 * 28.88 * 25.70 * 22.73 * 20.03

    Hope this helps...


    Monish
     
  4. davidarizpe

    davidarizpe AH Veteran

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    Monish I have heard that this super caliber is not recomended for a double rifle, do you know why?
     
  5. monish

    monish AH Elite

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    David,

    The .375 H&H is not a "big" gun, it is the upper end of the middle weights, & nor it is a caliber for short range hunting . One of the nice interesting things about it is that it has basically the same trajectories as an 30.06 when comparable bullets are compared, i.e. heavy, middle & lowest grain.

    The usual .375 H&H Belted Magnum is a bolt action.There is (was) a companion cartridge, the .375 H&H Flanged (rimmed) Magnum meant for positive extraction in double rifles, but it is obsolescent and hard to find.

    The double rifle with patent extractors for the belted cartridge are manufactured by Merkel, Chapuis, and Krieghoff

    Flanged cartridges are available but are expensive & hard to find . I have a Hollands DBBL Deluxe rifle chambered for flanged rounds .

    I find no other viable reason to as to why the DBBLs are not recommended for this super caliber. My experience & association with this cartridge specially belted, has been long & not much with Doubles as ammunition is not available here and I did procure few old flanged Kynochs cordite & Nitros but they hang fire .

    I have had in bolt actions, the 375 H&H Super Express Model 70 by Win. , Browning Olympian grade, and now I have a Mark V Weatherby chambered for this caliber . Great Caliber ...

    Monish
     
  6. B9.3

    B9.3 AH Veteran

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    The 375 H&H is a fine cartridge if you use factory ammo. It is not a good choice if you are a handloader as this case is notorious for stretching and incipient casehead separation. Cases have a very short life. If you handload and wish to experiment with different projectiles and velocities for accuracy, then it makes a lot of sense to clean that chamber up with a 375 Weatherby Magnum reamer. You will undoubtably end up with a better cartridge, with vastly improved case life, particularly if headspaced on the shoulder not the belt which is a silly protrusion on a sensibly designed case like the 375 Weatherby.
     
  7. enysse

    enysse AH Ambassador

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    Wow, I have to disagree, while I think the belt is silly invention...so are most of the Weatherby cartridges...who needs all the speed? And where are you going to find Weatherby ammo, if your ammo is lost or you run out?

    The 375 H&H is a universal caliber and a really sensible choice. Mild recoil too!!!
     
  8. Red Leg

    Red Leg GOLD SUPPORTER AH Fanatic

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    The .375 H&H is encountered in doubles (I own a Sodia so chambered), but it is not ideal because it is rimless. Doubles so chambered have a couple of spring loaded plungers which catch the rim - not the best system when used against something that might kill you. The British gunmakers did create the .375 flanged which one sees every now and then, but the African double was considered a stopping rifle and the many rimmed 40's do that much better than a .375.

    I agree with Monish, it is a truly wonderful round and a light .375 mauser is my favorite all purpose African rifle.
     
  9. monish

    monish AH Elite

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    Redleg,

    Very well stated , its a EMPEROR of all calibers , and has been around for 99 years without any variation or alteration at all . Centenary in 2012 ....... Awesome caliber..

    Monish
     
  10. B9.3

    B9.3 AH Veteran

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    You missed my point friend. If you read it again you will see that my statements are proven fact. Speed is no issue as there is only about 100 fps in it. What you get is vastly improved case life for reloading. The point of this post.. The Ultra Mags give higher velocity and much more recoil than the mild and very sensible 375 Weatherby. There are a number of manufactures of Weatherby cases for obvious reasons and they are widly available. As this post refered to the 375, you simply do what Roy and many others do. Simply fireform a packet of 375 H&H factory loads. You will get good ballistics, good hunting accuracy and a much more sensible case design. It is proven fact, very simple, very sensible. Case closed. Please do not think I am bagging the 375 H&H. I think it is an amazing cartridge in factory loads, not a good handloading proposition as it stretches very badly and that brass is flowing from the head area, greatly weakening the case.Of all the mediums, my very favourite is the 9.3x64 Brenneke loaded with North Fork or Swift A-Frames. Mine is a Winchester Model 70 with a 1.5-6x42 Zeiss Victory Diavari in Warne quick detach mounts. It is a medium action with a Pac Nor barrel. It is fully the equal of the 375s. It really is a bang,flop drt cartridge. I would hunt the world with this rifle. the 9.3x64 Brenneke case is a very good design with no flaws at all.
     
  11. philip in china

    philip in china AH Member

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    So what are we all going to do to celebrate the centenary? I feel we should do something.
     
  12. monish

    monish AH Elite

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    Philip,

    Put forth your suggestions, this caliber needs a perfect honorable felicitation ........ Has been the wonder cartridge , and still ruling the roost since such a long time.....

    Monish
     
  13. PHOENIX PHIL

    PHOENIX PHIL AH Legend

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    Monish,

    I know you were referring to a different Philip, but I'll chime in. If I could make it happen, I'd love for my .375H&H to take a nice old Buff with horns that drop well below his jaws. We'll see.

    Somewhere along the line I got the impression you had some health issues, I hope they're all behind you now.
     
  14. monish

    monish AH Elite

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    Hi Phoenix Phil,

    Thanks for the concern , Yes I am all up & tall again:dancing: , have had a real bad start with the 2011. Now just hitting the punch hard every day for my upcoming safari in Jan 2012.

    Yeah sure ! Even I intend taking a decent cape buff to commemorate the EMPEROR of calibers THE UN DAUNTING PERFORMER THE .375 H&H MAGNUM:worship:....

    Thanks

    Monish:)
     
  15. DiverDave

    DiverDave New Member

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    I have been shooting the 375 H&H for many long years. With most bullets man has produced for if. Even many hundreds of hard cast, more or less designed for the 375 Winchester. With careful attention, and not loading to ridiculous charges, the brass will give good life.

    Diver Dave
     

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