TANZANIA TURNING POINT...

Discussion in 'Hunting Africa' started by Shallom, May 23, 2012.

  1. Shallom

    Shallom AH Enthusiast

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    For those who have been following developments and climate of the Tourist Hunting Industry in Tanzania, there are some new indications of a looming cloud over the need for a Tourist Hunting Industry. I would like to express my serious concerns over the current turbulence and superficial controversy within the industry;

    With the new allocations being completed, there has been a disappointing rise in rumors and mumblings about the industry destined for failure due to a local empowerment law. As a Tanzanian, I despise those sentiments. While there is reason for concern due to newcomers into the industry and some very tough regulations that may hinder the best intentions of some Outfitters, there is every reason for optimism for many Tanzanian Outfitters who have vast experience in the industry.

    But this is not about foreign and local and most definitely not about segregation - this is about integration which is long overdue. This is an opportunity for stakeholders to come together for a greater cause - for the wildlife and natural habitats! So in consideration of all the negatives and mud-slinging that has been going around in relation to Tanzania - how about considering the fact that Tourist Hunting could be banned!? Does the hunting community want another Kenya case study?

    When people who claim to be the guru's of hunting in Tanzania and the salvation for conservation and flash glossy brochures about the millions of dollars being invested for the good of the world - ask yourself why it is that the Tanzanian Hunting Industry only accounts for $20 million dollars in annual revenue and whether that value justifies blocking out 20% of land mass to be utilized by 60 companies. Now think of politicians assessing the scenario and ask yourself again, whether they will not manage to wipe out the tourist hunting industry from the books. Where will that leave the bickering and disgruntled Outfitters?

    I plead with the stakeholders of this industry to start paying attention to the bigger picture and work within policy to safeguard the very positive and sustainable Wildlife Conservation Act & Regulations so that we prove our capacity as fully vested stakeholders in ensuring we serve the best interests of the industry and protect our hunting heritage. For those who are good at focusing on personal gains and material value and trying to impose ownership on an international resource - wake up to reality and be wiser in your assessment and tactics.

    Murmurs have already begun on how Tourist Hunting should not be prioritized because it is a source of corruption, conflict and generates minimally to the national budget. This combined with community animosity to what is branded a foreign ideology with oppressive connotations is enough to kill an industry So be warned my fellow stakeholders and do question anyone who paints a bleak future for hunting in Tanzania because of Tanzanians. The majority of Tanzanians live in poverty, but maintain civility and peace - but undermining their right to their resources having invited you to share them together, is an instigation that could lead to hostility. Let us tread carefully in partnership on this matter and maintain mutually beneficial collaborations. I speak as an exposed Tanzanian, sensitive to a global expectation and in the best interest of an international industry as well as my country.

    Let us not drag this wonderfully blessed country into another closed hunting chapter. Let us all work together to promote and safeguard its resources for benefit to stakeholders worldwide. Karibu Tanzania.
  2. James.Grage

    James.Grage GOLD SUPPORTER AH Legend

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    Ryan

    Thank you for the great information on Tanzania.

    I know the tree-hugger's and bunny-lover's are putting a lot of pressure on African countries to ban hunting.

    The information on money generated of Tanzania by the safari industry is eye opening. When hunting is such a small part of a countries income i would be easy to get rid of it. Just ask our corporate friends if they are shy about cutting marginal profit lines,

    Poverty in Tanzania is wide spread and as you say not getting better anytime soon.

    thanks
  3. Second Wind

    Second Wind AH Enthusiast

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    To the tree - hugger's and bunny-lovers: there will always be "hunting"

    To the people of Tanzania and Botswana, if you close hunting then we (as hunters) will simply go elsewhere, to your loss and another's gain.

    The "Kenyan Model" is working out so well, don't you think?

    I raise to question the $20 million dollar figure as to the economic impact of tourist hunting but I am a bit hard pressed to obtain accurate figures with which to dispute the claim, however, we are led to believe that the $20 million figure
    is the total of all money spent by safari expeditions by clients?

    Again, I am no expert, but a major undertaking in Tanzania could easily top $100,000 and using the accepted 5:1 economic impact ratio one would conclude that only 40 major safari efforts were made last year in all of Tanzania?

    Ok, lets say everyone did it "on the cheap" then 80?

    However, if poverty is as endemic as claimed and I am not disputing this assertion, then naturally, the economic impact ratio would easily expand to 7 or even 10 to 1

    None of these numbers seem realistic to me. If they are true then I believe the problem may lie in pricing models and advertising efforts and not "hunting" per say.

    I suppose you could ban hunting, plow up the Serengeti and plant wheat but that takes on a whole new risk-set and may pit the new Tanzanian farmer against US agribusiness . . . . yep, that's a plan

    Sport hunting has proven to be a virtually recession - proof industry. If you think Tanzania has poverty now ban hunting, watch Europe implode, the US back into the second leg of a recession and China stall. You will see some poverty my friend.

    I aver that the best course of action might be to attempt to make what you have better rather than tossing what you now have in the dust bin and pursuing a new, untested economic model.
  4. Shallom

    Shallom AH Enthusiast

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    Second Wind,
    after reading this reply I am beginning to think you are suggesting I AM in support of a possible hunting ban? I would like to make it very clear that I am in FULL SUPPORT of a hunting policy and an advocate to its preservation and sustainability for generations to come. My serious concerns about the POSSIBILITY of a hunting ban is what has triggered my expression on the matter because I know what is happening on the ground here in Tanzania. My views are aimed at a minority few who are generating this "Hunting Ban Sentiment" through their arbitrary methods of attacking the recent changes in Tanzania.

    Our policy is very strong, but it only takes a wave of public sentiment to drive the parliament legislators to make changes that could be detrimental to the Tourist Hunting Industry. I and many Tanzanians do not want that and we know it will not serve the future of Tanzania and Tanzanians - but when disrespect, exploitative measures, corrupt practices and political platforms are applied by some industry players - then it could cause an outcry for closure due to non-confidence by the public. Tanzania has a bright future in wildlife conservation, but there are minority forces that are affecting the positive efforts - that is what needs to be arrested before it causes an avalanche of bad decisions.

    p.s. $20 million is in direct income to the government from various tariffs in the tourist hunting industry. With the new changes, the target is $30 million - that is one of our challenges starting 2013 - to perform to further legitimize our cause.
  5. Second Wind

    Second Wind AH Enthusiast

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    Mr. Shallom,

    My most earnest apology.

    By fault, I am prone to use the generic "we, you and yours" descriptively and not personally.

    My intent was not to include you or besmirch your position or opinion.

    You appear to me to be an honest, forthright and sincere individual whose prime interest is the well-being and future of Tanzania and I commend and applaud you for that.

    My analysis and comment was directed, perhaps haphazardly, at those whose opinions seem to me to be ill-informed and born of political posturing rather than well considered and respect for the interest of their country.

    Certainly I am familiar with politicians who choose short term expediency to the hard work of nation building and wish you and all of Tanzania the very best as you circumnavigate the perils of political intrigue, anti-hunting protagonists and the generally uninformed
  6. James.Grage

    James.Grage GOLD SUPPORTER AH Legend

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    Ryan

    Thank you for the clarity.

    The 20 million is just for animals harvested and there license fee.

    Are there entries for the following going into another pocket when they should be counted:

    1. Rifle import fee
    2. Ammunition Fee
    3. Game scout/conservation officer
    4. Visa


    So who get to count this stream of revenue on there books.

    As you see hunter sportsman pay into many slots so to say.

    Then you have your travel:
    1. Motel
    2. meals
    3. shopping
    4. Air charter
    and other

    Are these being figured into the total the world sportsmen pay when traveling to Tanzania.

    Just thinking...

  7. Second Wind

    Second Wind AH Enthusiast

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    Mr. Shallom.

    I truly believe that all concerned here are of one mind, hunting aside, we all want what is truly best for Tanzania and her people, however, I believe the view as well as the perspective is somewhat different, How a resident views his environment is oftentimes decidedly different than the onlooker.

    As a boy I was taught by my father an African tale that is so applicable to the future Tanzania and other African countries face, it is called "Acres of Diamonds" and I lisen to Earle Nightengale tell the story at least a thousand times.

    I recall it to be the story of the Kimberly mines in South Africa . . . . I believe it merits a retelling now and each and every stakeholder in Tanzania might want to listen closely to the tale
  8. Shallom

    Shallom AH Enthusiast

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    James,
    these are the facts we need to highlight... as 'unbelievable' as it may sound, what appears logical to you and me, may be a void to many. The politicians are not going to do the work required to establish the full impact of an industry and will continue to value it through direct value (because it is the only statistic they have). Knowing this disadvantage requires us to now factually present the real value of the industry. Our Union is undertaking this task so that the house and the public are better informed about the benefits, potential and true value.

    At the end of the day, perspectives will always take different angles. The life of an average First World Citizen and that of a Third World Citizen are very contrasting. In a material world under the flag of globalization, money tends to be the determining factor. I refuse to have a price tag as part of my humanity and refuse to associate the same philosophy on nature. If it were just about price tags, I don't think I would be in this industry - but value in context of the resource & hunters/conservationists is my point of view.
  9. Shallom

    Shallom AH Enthusiast

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    I hear you...

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