Tanzania allocate special hunting zones to check species extinction, government told

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  1. AfricaHunting.com

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    Tanzania allocate special hunting zones to check species extinction, government told

    The government has been told to review the issuing of hunting licences and if necessary stake out special hunting zones in view of the decreasing number of wild animals in many blocks.

    The advice was given by Lt (rtd) Lepilal ole Moleiment, at Hatari Lodge on Saturday while presenting animal engravings carved by students of schools found near Arusha National Park (ANAPA) in a move to motivate them to protect wildlife and preserve the environment.

    With its headquarters at Momela village bordering the park, Hatari Lodge deals with livestock keepers, game wardens and environmental presevation.

    The retired Lieutenant said that some hunters were misusing given licences to kill animals, including pregnant females and young males, a practice which is not only prohibited by law, but also resulted in extinction of species.

    He mentioned some of the disappearing species as gazelle, ostrich, rhino, antelope, duma, impala, thompson’s, grant’s, pongo, dama and dorcas.

    He advised the government to devise special hunting zones, so that it could easily check against the malpractice instead of the current system where hunters are allowed to practice in any block.

    Besides, he suggested that the government should introduce a syllabus in schools on wildlife management and environmental preservation, so that students are sensitised on the importance of conserving wildlife and the environment for the benefit of the coming generations.

    ''Tanzania is naturally an endowed country—with many wildlife and geographical diversity. These, unlike commodities such as oil, do not need factories to manufacture them. Wildlife have one more advantage, if well guarded, they will ever last,'' Moleiment observed.

    For his part, Hatari Lodge managing director Marlies Gabriel, said his company has been cooperating with villagers living around the park to protect animals as well as the environment.

    He said the firm works to educate Tanzanians, particularly, the youth on environmental preservation for the benefit of future generations.

    Anapa director Domician Njau said they have been working together with the villages surrounding the park to check the poachers who invade the park.

    Established in 1960, the park no longer has tuskers or rhinos because of poaching, he said.


    Source: The Guardian
     
  2. enysse

    enysse AH Ambassador

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    That is one of the best things they could do!
     
  3. James.Grage

    James.Grage GOLD SUPPORTER AH Legend

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    This is probably a good move...

    The problem is usually poaching....

    and in a land where your family is starving what do you do...

    There are no jobs in the country...

    the small food plots could be wiped out in one evening by elephants...

    then what do they eat for the year...

    Water is nil to little in the country...

    If the village people do not see a monetary gain for letting the wild animals live they will be pushed off...
     

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