Tahr / Chamois Hunt New Zealand 2012 Rutt Special

Discussion in 'GREAT DEALS on Hunts Worldwide' started by Gunsmoke, Sep 29, 2011.

  1. Gunsmoke

    Gunsmoke AH Member

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    This Tahr / Chamois Hunt Special in New Zealand is for the May 2012 Rutt.

    5 day guided hunt for true free range wild Tahr and Chamois in alpine region + a free range Red stag.
    Price includes - international airport pick up from Queenstown, road transfers, helicopter transfer to remote hunt area, food, accomodation, alpine hunting guide, trophy fees for 1 x Bull tahr, 1 x trophy chamois and 1 x bronze red stag, field preperation of trophies

    Regular discounted price is NZD $11500 but the first to book for the May rutt will recieve the helicopter transfer for FREE - discount a further $1500
    Price for the first to book a May 2012 hunt will now pay only NZD $10,000. At current exchange rates that is approx $8000 USD

    FURTHER - I am so confident you will get the opportunity to shoot your trophies I will offer a refund amount on any trophy you do not get the opportunity to harvest (some conditions apply)

    Exceptional free range wild Red Stags and Fallow Buck are likely to be encountered in the hunt areas ...as well as wild boar and trophy goats and small game species
    Additional hunt days can be added and additional trophies may be added to this hunt. Some photos are attached of a recent hunt in this location

    (One only special offer available)

    red stag (11).JPG Alpine Chamois hunt (4).JPG Day4.JPG Day 2 Alpine hunt (22).JPG Day 4 (21).jpg DSC_0032.JPG DSC_0054.JPG DSC_0059.JPG NZtahr.jpg

    A reasonable level of fitness is required for the Alpine hunt
  2. timbear

    timbear AH Enthusiast

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    Oops - what's this? I have lived for 6 1/2 years in NZ, and the last time I looked, thar, chamois, deer, pigs, goats, in fact all mammals (barring 2 types of bat) are classified as imported PESTS by DOC, the Department of Conservation. Not only are there no trophy fees to pay to any officials, but except for duting the roar / rut, where DOC ballots hunting blocks (for free, to avoid overcrowding and accidents), there is not even a limit on the number of animals you can take. New Zealand is the last hunter's paradise on earth, the one country where you can chuck your rifle in the back of the ute, go bush for a few days and hunt to your heart's content, without tags, fees or much regulation, at least on DOC land, which is most of the native bush and high mountains. Even hunting on farm land normally only requires the common courtesy of asking the owner's permission. It is ILLEGAL for land owners to charge fees for hunting on their properties (!), as the game is not considered property of the land owner but public property (game farms exempted, of course, deer breeding for export is a flourishing business in NZ). Some people are trying to find a way around those laws by calling the fees something else, a thorn in the side of all regular NZ hunters, for they rightly fear that if a trophy fee industry is established, their free hunting days may be numbered.
    Now, I am not trying to ruin anybody's business. If someone offers to drive you, accommodate you, feed you and helicopter you to the site where animals are, that costs money. If you have the cash to burn, that is a way, but it is not the Kiwi way. I just believe that most hunters internationally have gotten so used to paying trophy or tag fees that they simply accept the fact, and I believe this information about New Zealand is important to know if you are planning to hunt there. My advice: if you want to hunt in New Zealand, contact the New Zealand Deer Stalkers Association. They are represented in every small town, and will gladly help a foreign hunter. I have found Kiwis to be tremendously friendly and hospitable. And then: put on sturdy walking boots, grab a good backpack and your rifle, and do your hunt the real way. Hunting in New Zealand is an unbelievable experience!
  3. Gunsmoke

    Gunsmoke AH Member

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    Hi Timbear,

    You do indeed live in a lucky country with the number of quality game animals available. Your comments are accurate in that such animals are classed as feral and may be freely hunted on Doc blocks (subject still in some cases to granting of permits/ ballots and restricted seasons for helicopters)

    For a local Kiwi with local knowledge, access to premium areas and the time, yes there are possibly much less expensive options than a fully guided hunt for you. For an international hunter we however can provide an incredible experience, in foreign country and in the time that they may have available to hunt.

    Asiatic water buffalo in Australia....... to Bears in Alaska have no compulsory or set trophy fee but every operation charges one. Your argument confuses me somewhat as you do not question operations in other countries but appear to think that it is somewhat beyond belief that a trophy fee might apply to harvested game in New Zealand on a professional hunt?

    It may be that you never hunt Africa if you are unwilling to pay a PH for his services and a fee for the trophies you harvest !

    For a foreign hunter with a desire to experience the beauty of New Zealand, the numerous game and the outstanding quality of trophies available then we are able to deliver an experience at an exceptional price.

    Your last line of your post pretty much sums up what we are selling

    "Hunting in New Zealand is an unbelievable experience"

    couldnt agree more - thanks for your feed back

    Barry

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