Plains game rifle reccomendation

Discussion in 'Up To .375' started by VonJager, Mar 8, 2010.

  1. VonJager

    VonJager AH Senior Member

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    I will start this by saying I am left handed and I am limited to wanting a left handed rifle.

    I am going to Namibia in 2011 and am looking for a new rifle to take along. I have a Sako .270 LH that is of no use because Namibia requires a 7mm (.284) minimum. I have been drawn to Ruger because they offer affordable LH rifles in a number of calibers. Species I have on my wish list include Hartmann's Zebra, Kudu, Gemsbok, Hartebeest and Springbok.

    I don't want anything that would "replace" my .270 because it is an awesome deer slayer, but would compliment it nicely. .30-06, .300 win mag, 300 RCM?

    Any other thoughts? Do the new Winchester's come in LH? I know CZ makes LH rifles, but are more expensive than Ruger.

    Thanks!
     
  2. mikeh416Rigby

    mikeh416Rigby AH Senior Member

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    Based on your wish list I'd go with a .338 Win. Magnum. It's flat shooting, hits hard, and good bullets are available for it. Good luck on your Safari.
     
  3. Bearhunter

    Bearhunter AH Member

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    LH Savage, accurate and cheap

    Look into a Savage.

    I also shoot left hand. I recently ordered a 338 Win Mag. in stainless steel/synthetic. Here in Canada they are about $700.00.

    Considered economical and accurate.
     
  4. mikeh416Rigby

    mikeh416Rigby AH Senior Member

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    You're not the first person who's commented on the accuracy of the Savage Rifles as they come from the factory. I've never owned one, but a couple of my friends do, and I must say I've been impressed with their accuracy, smoothness of the action and a decent, factory set trigger pull.
     
  5. Mike70560

    Mike70560 AH Fanatic

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    VonJager,

    I feel your pain being left handed also.

    Have you considered a Ruger No. 1? A 9.3 by 74 would be a cool cartridge that would be great on plainsgame and could be used for buffalo. I used my Ruger No 1 416 Rem on my first trip to Africa and killed two buffalo with it.

    Other than that a 338 Win is very good on plainsgame as is a 300 Win Mag. Surely some of the new cartridges like the RCMs would be good.

    My choices for plainsgame:

    First: My CZ 550 375 H&H upgraded by AHR. It is left hand and CZ charges way too much. Wayne's work is worth every penny. It is what I am bringing this year for PG and a backup in case anything would happen to my double.

    Second: My Winchester Bolt gun in 338 Win. left hand Classic. It is what I brought on my first trip.

    If I was buying a dedicated rifle for PG and North America hunting the Ruger No1 in the 9.3 by 74 would be my choice.

    Anyway pick one you like and shoot well. Practice alot before you go. Make certain the rifle functions flawlessly. Use premium bullets, Swift A-Frames are tough to beat. Then go have fun!!
     
  6. VonJager

    VonJager AH Senior Member

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    Thanks for the input. I had not really thought about .338. I will look at savage again.

    I have Swift A-Frames for my .270 and they drop game in its tracks. Finding another round with Swift's would be great as well, even though I have always heard great things about Norma and Nosler Partitions as well.
     
  7. monish

    monish AH Elite

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    Hi Von,

    Well I use both my shoulders to fire when young was a dedicated left hand user but with the cheek rest Weatherbys I now regularly fire off from my right shoulder, because in my country we cant afford the luxury to customize a rifle as per the state arms laws. So have to use the right hand models now, and to get the knack and accuracy had fired off ample amount of rounds off the right shoulder without a shooting bench. The big bores really bite but practice makes the shoulder strong to take the wallop.

    The rifle recomendation for the game you plan taking in left hand is .300 Weatherby deluxe or Accumark LH models and you can have a rifle customized for your self as you have lots of time on your hands for your safari.
    This is a than adequate calibers for you listed game.

    All the best

    Happy Hunting !!! Have a great safari

    Monish
     
  8. BJV

    BJV New Member

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    If you compare the 8x68s to all 300's and the 338 win mag you will find that it outperforms all 300's in the 180-220gr class. the 8x68s can also a fires a 250gr bullet for bushveld conditions at 2380 ft/sec with a 20mm grouping. the 338 WM can not shoot a 250gr bullet slower than 2500ft/sec with a good grouping. Sabi arms in SA makes custom guns. You can also try Rosenthals in Windhoek in Namibia. Should you require more detail regarding the 8x68s, search Google for "Germanys great eight (8)". The 8x68 is becoming more popular in SA and Namibia. I have heard from Ken Stewart of Stewarts high performance bullets, that hunters use the 8x68s in Zim and in Mozambique with 250gr Stewrt bullets on buffalo with great success. Good all rounder for African conditions if you use 200gr for long distance flat shooting and 250gr for bushveld conditions.
     
  9. Macs B

    Macs B AH Veteran

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    VonJager
    I too am a left hander, and I feel your pain.
    My recommendation is the Browning A Bolt in your caliber of choice. I’ve used Browning most of my life. Even though I’ve owned and currently own other rifles I can’t remember when I didn’t own a Browning.
    Check the factory website www.browning.com you’ll find they make blued and stainless, composite or wood stocked, and with or without the BOSS. Caliber choices range from .223 to 375. There might even be a 416 on there but I can’t say for sure.
    If you are hunting in 2011 you’ve got ample time to either order from the factory or get one built to spec. There is another thread on here about favorite guns, the Browning A-Bolt is my choice. The actions are smooth as silk from the factory, adjustable triggers, and either solid bottom metal or detachable box mags. That could be an advantage on a mixed bag hunt to quickly change from soft to solid or light to heavy. Just my two cents worth.
     
  10. Mike70560

    Mike70560 AH Fanatic

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    Another choice is the Tikka. I believe you can buy one in the 9.3 by 62 or a 338 Win Mag.

    The Tikkas I have looked at are nice rifles. Like the Savage, people who own one like it very much.
     
  11. Skyline

    Skyline AH Fanatic

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    Personally, since you already have a nice .270 that works for you, out of the cartridges you suggested in your original post my choice would be the .300 Win. Mag.

    Now that the .338 Win. Mag. has entered the discussion there is no doubt that it would be my choice. Bullet selection is outstanding with the 160 grain Barnes TTSX on the lower end and the 275 grain Swift A-frame and the 300 grain Woodleigh on the high end.

    I have used the .300's, the .338 Win. Mag., .340 Wby and .375 extensively over the last 35 years and shot hundreds of head of game in North America and plains game........and I have seen hundreds more shot with just about anything you can think of by clients I was guiding. Hands down, with all things considered, the .338 Win. Mag. would be my pick of the bunch.

    But that is just my opinion and we all know what opinions are worth.:)
     
  12. sparkyrendon

    sparkyrendon New Member

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    Your .270 should be fine

    I hunted in Namibia in May 2008, and used my .270 to take each of the animals that you are pursuing, with no problems. Unless the rule has recently changed, there was no issue with using a .270. My PH wanted me to use a .30 or bigger for the wildebeest and zebra, but after I took the gemsbok, kudu, and springbok, he said, "Bring your rifle...we are going zebra hunting." Everything was a one shot kill except for the zebra, and he stepped forward when I pulled the trigger...from over 325 yards away!

    My rifle is a Savage 116 with a Nikon scope, and I was shooting Winchester XP3 Elite's in 150gr. Everything performed very well. Take the rifle you are comfortable with and shoot well. :cool:
     
  13. oscar1975

    oscar1975 AH Veteran

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    In my opinion, an ideal size would be the 338 Winchester Magnum, because it has a variety of tips and a forcefulness beyond doubt. With it you can shoot down from the small to the largest duiker ungulates, correctly choosing the tip and pointing.

    Oscar.
     

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