Padlocks on Rifle case?

Discussion in 'Hunting Africa' started by GaryO, Jun 21, 2011.

  1. GaryO

    GaryO AH Senior Member

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2010
    Messages:
    59
    Likes Received:
    0
    Member of:
    NRA
    Hunted:
    South Africa
    I have an excellent SKB double rifle case with 4 locking latches. I have heard that to fly with my rifles to RSA on Delta that I will need to lock that case with padlocks. There is no provision on that case for the use of padlocks. Will I need to install padlock hasps or will the factory locking latches sufice? Thanks...
     
  2. bcarper

    bcarper AH Veteran

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2010
    Messages:
    150
    Likes Received:
    0
    My Photos:
    16
    Member of:
    SCI,NAHC,
    Hunted:
    USA, South Africa
    My experience with Delta, and RSA, is, you need pad-locks. The kind that security can unlock, or they cut them off. My case had two locks, they had me buy a third in the airport. Brian
     
  3. James.Grage

    James.Grage GOLD SUPPORTER AH Legend

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2010
    Messages:
    2,956
    Likes Received:
    146
    My Photos:
    73
    Member of:
    NRA, ATA, PITA, NAHC, NAFC, DU, TU, DSC, SCI, RMEF
    Hunted:
    USA - Canada -Tanzania, South Africa, Zimbabwe
    GaryO

    Read the info...check to see if you see padlocks?

    You have to looks at TSA and then Airline regulations you are flying with...

    TSA
    Traveling with Special Items

    Firearms & Ammunition
    You may only transport firearms, ammunition and firearm parts in your checked baggage. Firearms, ammunition and firearm parts are prohibited from carry-on baggage.
    Failure to adhere to the following regulations will preclude passengers from traveling with firearms, ammunitions or firearm parts:

    • Travelers must declare all firearms, ammunition, and parts to the airline during the ticket counter check-in process.
    • The firearm must be unloaded.
    • The firearm must be in a hard-sided container.
    • The container must be locked. A locked container is defined as one that completely secures the firearm from being accessed. Cases that can be pulled open with little effort cannot be brought aboard the aircraft. Federal regulations prohibit unlocked gun cases (or cases with broken locks) on aircraft.
    • TSA inspects all firearm cases at the ticket counter. Travelers should remain in the area designated by the aircraft operator or TSA representative to take the key back after the container is cleared for transportation. If travelers are not present and the security officer must open the container, TSA or the airline will make a reasonable attempt to contact the owner. If contact is not made, the container will not be placed on the aircraft.
    • Travelers must securely pack any ammunition in fiber (such as cardboard), wood or metal boxes or other packaging that is specifically designed to carry small amounts of ammunition.
    • Travelers may not use firearm magazines/clips for packing ammunition unless they completely and securely enclose the ammunition (e.g., by securely covering the exposed portions of the magazine or by securely placing the magazine in a pouch, holder, holster or lanyard).
    • Ammunition may be carried in the same hard-sided case as the firearm, as long as it follows packing guidelines described above.
    • TSA prohibits black powder or percussion caps used with black-powder.
    These regulations are strictly enforced. Violations can result in criminal prosecution and civil penalties of up to $10,000 per violation.
    Airlines may have additional requirements for traveling with firearms and ammunition. Therefore, travelers should also contact the airline regarding firearm and ammunition carriage policies.
    Also, please note that other countries have different laws that address transportation and possession of firearms. If you are traveling internationally, please check regulations at your destination about their requirements.


    Delta
    Rifles and Shotguns

    Delta will accept firearms and shooting equipment packaged as follows:

    • One gun case containing up to a total of four rifles or shotguns, plus shooting materials, and tools
    • One gun case containing up to five handguns, one scope, and tools
    • One bow and quiver of arrows and maintenance kit enclosed in a case or container of sufficient strength to protect the bow and quiver from accidental damage
    One gun case may contain up to four rifles or shotguns and will be counted as one bag. An excess baggage fee will apply if checking more than one gun case. You can check up to two shotguns and two shotgun cases. Ammunition is limited to 11 lbs. (5 kg).

    KLM
    Firearms and ammunition for shooting and hunting sports

    Carrying ammunition and firearms in hand baggage is not permitted. You may carry such items for shooting and hunting purposes as check-in baggage under certain strict conditions.
    Each weapon counts as a single item of baggage. If you wish to take more baggage than the maximum allowance, the excess baggage fees apply.
    You must always have the following permits in your possession:

    • The licenses for the weapons in question.
    • Import and export permits for the countries concerned.
    • The permission of the Dutch Customs service to travel to, from or via the Netherlands.

    Furthermore, the following rules apply:

    • You must make a reservation for travel with firearms and/or ammunition. This can be done through your travel agent or by contacting us.
    • Firearms must be unloaded and safely packed in a suitcase or other case. The cartridges must be packed safely, preferably in a suitcase.
    • Sports and hunting rifles must be transported separately from the ammunition.
    • Ammunition may only be intended for shooting sport and a maximum of 5 kg (11 lbs) of ammunition may be carried per passenger.
    • Baggage containing ammunition may not carry labels with the text ‘explosives’.
    • Transporting ammunition with explosive or flammable projectiles is not permitted.
    • When you check in you should declare that your weapon is unloaded and the ammunition has been packed separately.
     
  4. James.Grage

    James.Grage GOLD SUPPORTER AH Legend

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2010
    Messages:
    2,956
    Likes Received:
    146
    My Photos:
    73
    Member of:
    NRA, ATA, PITA, NAHC, NAFC, DU, TU, DSC, SCI, RMEF
    Hunted:
    USA - Canada -Tanzania, South Africa, Zimbabwe
    South Africa airline
    Firearms & ammunition

    Firearms & ammunition information

    Passengers who wish to travel with their firearms may do so provided they comply with the following policies and procedures.

    • Acceptance of carriage
    • Check-in protocol
    • Arrival protocol
    • General information
    • Airlink
    • South African Express
    • Mango

    Acceptance of carriage​


    Firearms designed for sporting purposes, such as target pistols and safari/hunting rifles, may be carried on South African Airways under the following conditions:

    • The firearm must be unloaded and, if possible, dismantled and packed in a suitable lockable firearm case.
    • Firearms will be processed at the firearm desk for safe carriage in the hold of the aircraft.
    • Ammunition (cartridges for weapons) must be securely stored in a lockable container within checked baggage.
    • The maximum weight of the ammunition carried by any single passenger is 5kg (11lb).
    • For transfer and transit passengers who are connecting to onward flights, prior clearance to travel with firearms and ammunition must be obtained from the South African Police Firearm Office at the airport.

    Check-in protocol​


    • At time of check-in, all firearms and ammunition must be declared to the airline agent.
    • Undeclared firearms and ammunition will result in luggage being rejected during mandatory screening. As a result, the passenger will be required to open his/her baggage for further inspection and safe handling, or the items will be confiscated for further processing.
    • Check-in agents will issue the relevant baggage tags and then direct firearm owners to the firearm desk for inspection.
    Firearm desk​


    • The owner of the firearm will be required to produce a valid licence or temporary import permit.
    • The owner of the firearm(s) will be required to make and declare the firearm(s) safe for carriage.
    • Security staff will request the firearm owner to open his/her checked luggage to verify that ammunition is securely packed and within the maximum weight allowed.

    Arrival protocol​


    • Upon arrival, passengers are required to proceed to the allocated firearm desk to collect firearms and/or ammunition.
    • Checked baggage containing ammunition may be collected at the normal baggage carousel.
    • After collection of checked baggage containing ammunition, you are required to proceed to the South African Police Firearm office, where all necessary import permits and other documentation will be finalised.

    General information​


    Strict legislation on the carriage of hand-held firearms exists in almost all countries, and heavy fines could be imposed on the passenger and carrier should such items be transported without the necessary documentation (import permits/licence, etc.)

    • It is the RESPONSIBILITY OF THE PASSENGER to consult with the local consulate of the country to which he/she will be traveling, including transit/stopovers where applicable, to establish and comply with all entry requirements of the countries concerned.
    Firearm documentation​


    • South African citizens and residents require a South African firearm licence.
    • Visitors require a Temporary Import Permit; these will only be issued to foreign hunters and participants in an organised sport-shooting event.
    • Temporary import permits can be obtained either:
      • On arrival at the South African Police Firearm office
      • At least four weeks before arrival in South Africa:
        • The Registrar
          Private bag X 811
          Pretoria, 0001
          Republic of South Africa.
    Requirements:​


    • Passport and return airline ticket
    • Firearm licence or proof of ownership from country of residence
    • Invitation letter, on an official letterhead, from sport shooting event organiser
    • Letter from owner of firearms stating the reasons why the firearms are needed in South Africa
    • Address where person will stay in South Africa
    • Export permit from country of residence
    Restrictions:​



    • No automatic, semi-automatic firearms or military weapons are allowed
    • No firearms for self-defence allowed
    • Only one firearm per caliber allowed
    • Only 200 rounds of ammunition allowed per firearm
    • No handguns may be imported to South Africa without the necessary permits
    • Person must be 21 years and older to enable them to import a firearm to South Africa


    Airlink​



    • Airlink will no longer transport firearms, except hunting rifles and shotguns. Hunting rifles shall only be transported to and from the following destinations:
      • O R Tambo International, Johannesburg
      • Cape Town
      • Durban
      • Port Elizabeth
      • Kimberly
      • Polokwane
      • Phalaborwa
      • Kruger
      • Mpumalanga International Airport, Nelspruit
      • Upington
      • Bloemfontein

    • Airlink will continue to transport handguns, shotguns and rifles to all destinations except the following:
      • Mafikeng
      • Mthatha
      • Phalaborwa (Rifles are accepted)
      • Pietermaritzburg

    South African Express​


    Hunting rifles and shotguns may be transported on South African Express Airways flights.
    Only law enforcement agents may be allowed to transport their hand guns on South African Express Airways flights. They must produce some form of official identification e.g appointment certificate. They shall be liable for the stipulated cost for the transportation of the firearm.
    NOTE: No firearms may be transported to George Airport

    • Firearms may be accepted on all South African Express Airways destinations listed below:
      • Port Elizabeth
      • Kruger Mpumalanga International
      • Hoedspruit
      • Cape Town
      • Kimberly
      • Maputo
      • Gaborone
      • Richards Bay
      • Walvis Bay
      • Durban
      • Windhoek
      • East London
      • Lubumbashi
      • Bloemfontein

    South African Airways & Mango codeshare between Cape Town and Durban​


    Important information to note when travelling on the Mango codeshare flights:

    • Firearms will no longer be accepted for travel on this route. This is a requirement of the operating carrier Mango.
     
  5. Mike70560

    Mike70560 AH Fanatic

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2009
    Messages:
    825
    Likes Received:
    22
    My Photos:
    110
    You do not need padlocks. I use a Tuffpak with the coke machine type lock.

    If you do use a padlock, a non-TSA lock should be used although I have seen TSA locks on gun cases without issues. As James posted earlier:

    •The container must be locked. A locked container is defined as one that completely secures the firearm from being accessed. Cases that can be pulled open with little effort cannot be brought aboard the aircraft. Federal regulations prohibit unlocked gun cases (or cases with broken locks) on aircraft.

    The key words are "completely secures". The TSA lock does not completely secure the gun case.

    Gary,

    I would consider using another gun case. The SKB cases I have seen that were strong enough to fly used padlocks. The others do not. It is amazing what can happen during handling.
     
  6. James.Grage

    James.Grage GOLD SUPPORTER AH Legend

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2010
    Messages:
    2,956
    Likes Received:
    146
    My Photos:
    73
    Member of:
    NRA, ATA, PITA, NAHC, NAFC, DU, TU, DSC, SCI, RMEF
    Hunted:
    USA - Canada -Tanzania, South Africa, Zimbabwe
    Mike

    I also use a tuffpak...

    i did see where a fellow traveler had a gun case that had 4 spots for a padlock and was asked to have a lock in all 4 locations...

    Again last year i learned making many phone calls to stay up todate with the ever changing rules and learned in talking to TSA agents in Seattle area...that if you do further reading you are required to use non-TSA locks...
     
  7. 6MM

    6MM AH Veteran

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2010
    Messages:
    101
    Likes Received:
    0
    My Photos:
    8
    I prefer to use a locked padlock vs. a TSA approved lock. It is not an issue. As far as ammo goes my wife and I are carrying 11 lbs each in a locked Pelican Box inside out bag. This is not required to exit the states but my rifle service in RSA suggests it. Wheels up in 8 days!
     
  8. PHOENIX PHIL

    PHOENIX PHIL AH Legend

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2009
    Messages:
    2,590
    Likes Received:
    190
    My Photos:
    23
    Member of:
    SCI
    Hunted:
    USA, S. Africa
    I'm assuming your meant "our" bag and not out. This is what my wife and I did last year with basically no problem We did have an issue at the Delta counter at Tambo when we were returning.

    The Delta counter lady said the bag that the ammo was in had to be locked. I showed her that it was. She replied again that the bag had to be locked. In complete bewilderment I showed her that the ammo box was locked. She then tersely replied that the suitcase also had to be locked. I asked if I take this lock off the ammo box and put it on the suitcase that would be okay? She said yes.:confused: I'm not kidding.

    Unfortunately the padlock on the ammo box was too large to fit the zipper tab holes. Fortunately there was an extra one of those little toy locks for the suitcase on another bag. I never bother to use those since I see them again to be toys. But, the Delta lady was satisfied by that. Again I was bewildered.

    Now I don't think the woman had a clue, but sometimes it's best not to argue. My point being, carry extra locks, you don't know what you're going to run into.
     
  9. 6MM

    6MM AH Veteran

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2010
    Messages:
    101
    Likes Received:
    0
    My Photos:
    8
    Correct "our" bags, I always carry extra locks too. You never know. I actually had a guy at TSA in San Angelo, TX suggest I put another lock on that I had to make the case I was using more secure. Even offered one up if I did not have one. Course that's an area in TX where hunting is a staple to the economy. I also think it's a lot to do with who waits on you if they don't like the shooting sports they will do whatever the regulations allow to make your life miserable. I gotten to the point that if I fly or go ship a rifle I'll have their policy right with me, as well as the regulations.
     

Share This Page