Mosin Nagant

Discussion in 'Firearms & Ammunition' started by redivan32, Oct 25, 2011.

  1. redivan32

    redivan32 New Member

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    Hey guys,

    I'm trying to start planning for a hunting trip for hippo within the next two years.

    My current rifle is a surplus Mosin Nagant from the Ukraine. I've taken a boar with it already, and I really like its simplicity and the way it shoots. Will the 7.62x54mmR take down a hippo? If not, whats the biggest animal it can take down?

    Thanks!

    -Steve
  2. richteb

    richteb AH Enthusiast

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    I think that this caliber would be too light for hippo. I think anything up to a kudu and perhaps Eland would be as far as far as I would go.
  3. fhm3006

    fhm3006 AH Enthusiast

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    I agree - what i read this is a 30 cal in 7.62 mm.
    It may take a hippo...but in my honest opinion you do not want to be under-gunned going after hippo.

    General info on this rifle Mosin
  4. spekieries

    spekieries New Member

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    Redivan

    I think the hunting laws of the countries in Africa requires at least .375 or 9.3x62 as the minimum caliber to hunt dangerous game with.Hippos are extremely thick skinned and can weight up to two tons. To hold that weight bones are extremely thick ..30 Is good for most plains game with well constructed premium bullets. I however feel that .30 on large animals like Eland becomes marginal. I know a lot of hunters has done it with .30, but like I said it becomes marginal.
  5. enysse

    enysse AH Ambassador

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    Buy a used 375 H&H, there is a lot of them out there. Make sure you buy a excellent scope, because unless you are hunting them on land you are going to need one to make a accurate brain shot.
  6. libertarian

    libertarian AH Member

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    I strongly endorse the 375H&H approach. There are plenty of used ones around, and several manufactures make relatively inexpensive and very high quality 375's currently. Load it up with some premium bullets and you're in business.
  7. BRICKBURN

    BRICKBURN SUPER MODERATOR CONTRIBUTOR GOLD BENEFACTOR AH Ambassador

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    You may like your rifle but....

  8. redivan32

    redivan32 New Member

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    Thanks for all the help guys

    Is there any rifles that can shoot a .375 without much recoil? I know that sounds silly buy my Mosin kicks like a mule and I was hoping to get something lighter so I have faster recovery time.
  9. spekieries

    spekieries New Member

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    Redivan

    Al .375 projectiles of the same weight driven at the same velocity will have the same amount of recoil. However variables like stock design, weight of the rifle, muzzle breaks and aids like mercury cylinders in the stock all help to reduce recoil. If you say a 7.62 kicks like a mule, please try a .375 before you consider buying.
  10. timbear

    timbear AH Enthusiast

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    Redivan, I shoot a CZ 550 American (straight stock) in .375 H&H that I bought second hand for AUD 1100.-. The rifle is 4.5kg, and this soaks up quite a lot of recoil. Overall,the .375 H&H delivers more of a push than a slap, quite tolerable to me. It also holds 5+1 rounds, unlike most other DG rifles which mainly hold 3(+/-1). I presently have a 4x40 Meopta scope on it, but will be switching soon to a 3-12x52 Meopta as I am planning to make this my all-round rifle. Love that shooting iron!
  11. KMG Hunting Safaris

    KMG Hunting Safaris SPONSOR AH Elite

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    Eric has offered you some excellent advise here. Certainly nothing less than a .375. You will need enough gun in case that first shot is not true and you are faced with a charge.
    As always the members have provided some excellent advice.
  12. Ole Bally

    Ole Bally AH Enthusiast

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    I have shot rifles up to 600 caliber and it' is my humble opinion that stock design (or lack thereof) is the prime cause of felt recoil! I used to have an old 8mm German military Mauser which I also claim kicked more than my 458 ever did! The old Greener single barrel falling block shot guns also had tremendous 'felt recoil'. In both these weapons, I noticed the stock is very straight with little drop at comb! Hence I believe you that your MN kicks like a mule! If you were to go to a proper gunsmith and get yourself measured up, take the details down and then go to a gun show and find a rifle which is of suitable caliber which also meets as many of your measurement requirements as possible! I believe you'll enjoy your shooting experiences so much more with a rifle that fits!
  13. PaulT

    PaulT AH Fanatic

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    Excellent advice Ole Bally, and never a truer word spoken regarding stock fit, a point so often missed by folk buying their first big bore.

    I have a very light (8lb all-up) .375 that fits me perfectly yet has the felt recoil of most 30/06's.
    I also have a very long and heavy (10.5lbs) .375 that I shoot identical loads out of as the other gun yet this heavier gun kicks the snot out of me.

    You can buy small to medium bore rifles off the shelf and if they dont fit you well then you either get accustomed to them, or sell for for something that does.
    With big bores (.375 +) the stock must fit you or your not going to like it !!!

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