Midlands Black Rhino Conservancy Zimbabwe

Discussion in 'News & Announcements' started by AFRICAN INDABA, May 10, 2013.

  1. AFRICAN INDABA

    AFRICAN INDABA CONTRIBUTOR AH Enthusiast

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    Midlands Black Rhino Conservancy Zimbabwe

    The Midlands Black Rhino Conservancy Trust (MBRC) is situated in the heart of Zimbabwe. The area consists of 63 000 ha (156 000 acres) of bush and farmland bounded by the Munyati River on the northern boundary and the Sebakwe River on the southern boundary with Lake Sebakwe and its Recreational Park in the middle. It is located 50kms north east of Kwe Kwe which is 200kms south of the country's capital city of Harare.

    A group of twelve farms joined together in the late 1980s to form the Conservancy. As well as black rhino a small herd of elephant, pride of lions, a healthy population of leopard and sable and a good cross-section of plains game including kudu, impala, eland, giraffe and zebra are on the conservancy. Each farmer has taken down internal game fence and makes monthly contributions to the cost of anti-poaching activities and protection of the Black Rhino, all other wildlife and the natural environment.

    With only a few black rhino in the MBRC it is the intention over the next few years to build up the herd to a sustainable breeding nucleus. Since inception the Conservancy has had the continued support of the UK-based Sebakwe Black Rhino Trust which was set up in 1989 primarily to help conserve black rhinos. Other well-wishers assisted in various forms among which are Toyota Zimbabwe, Save the Rhino Australia and recently Midwest Rhinos Cricket Franchise. As a small organisation with a limited field of operation you can see where every pound, dollar or euro received is spent and how donors are making a real difference to actual events on the ground.

    The Trust was instrumental in developing the Sebakwe Conservation and Education Centre located on the southern boundary of the Conservancy. It plays a significant role in wildlife education and community development. Through skilled wildlife and environmental officers it provides courses and practical knowledge on fauna and flora to visiting schools and other educational establishments. Over the past five years community development projects have been undertaken including the construction new schools, drilling of boreholes and the development of health centres and clinics, as well as self-help projects such as bee-keeping. Medical goods, learning materials (books and writing pads) school furnishings and clothes have also been provided as part of community development by the Conservancy. These community development projects have raised awareness among surrounding communities leading to reduced poaching and environmental degradation.

    Aims of the Conservancy:
    1. Re-fencing of the Conservancy.
    2. Establishment of a sustainable black rhino breeding nucleus.
    3. Development of the already present leopard, sable and plains game.
    4. Natural habitat education and local community awareness of environment and wildlife.
    5. The need to increase scout numbers and have a reliable transport for security for tacking and reaction purposes.

    In order to realise these aims MBRC is seeking donations from well-wishers and potential working relationships. MBRC has not lost a rhino for the past five years which is a HUGE accomplishment!!! A new little rhino was actually born on the Conservancy on 18th "February 2013!
     
  2. SEAWOLF607

    SEAWOLF607 New Member

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    Sounds like great work. I had feared the Black Rhino had gone extinct.
     

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