MANEATING TIGERS OF INDIA

Discussion in 'Hunting Asia & Middle East' started by monish, May 4, 2010.

  1. monish

    monish AH Elite

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    Maneating Tigers of India

    Although humans are not regular prey for them, the tiger has killed more people than any other cat. Between 1800 and 1900, it is estimated that tigers had killed over 10,000 people in India alone, coinciding with the wave of British settlement. However, man-eaters are mostly old and injured tigers, and almost all tigers that are identified as man-eaters are eventually captured, shot or poisoned. Man-eaters have been a recurrent problem for India, especially in Kumaon, Garhwal and the Sundarbans mangrove swamps of Bengal, where some healthy tigers have been known to hunt humans.

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    Man Killer Tiger

    Because many of the south Asian subspecies of tiger, particularly the Bengal tiger in Bangladesh and India, live in areas of high and growing population density, farmers and loggers have a long and continuing history of encroaching on tiger habitat, increasing the probability of confrontation. The number of tigers as a whole has dwindled in the twenty-first century, partly due to indiscriminate poaching.

    Reasons for attacking
    Tigers are sometimes intimidated from attacking humans, especially if they are unfamiliar with people. Unlike man-eating leopards, even established man-eating tigers will seldom enter human settlements, usually sticking to village outskirts. Nevertheless, attacks in human villages do occur.

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    Man-eater Tiger

    Tigers are typically wary of humans and have shown no preference for human meat. Although humans are relatively easy prey, they are not a desired source of food. Most tigers will only attack a human if they cannot physically satisfy their needs otherwise. Thus, most man-eating tigers are old, infirm or have missing teeth. In one case, a post-mortem examination of a killed tigress revealed two broken canine teeth, four missing incisors and a loose upper molar, handicaps which make capturing more standard prey extremely difficult. Only once reaching this stage did she attack a workman.

    Taste for human flesh may be acquired by the consumption of corpses which have lain unburied. During the Vietnam and Korean wars, soldiers became the victims of tigers who had acquired a taste for human flesh in this way. Tigers will stalk groups of people bending down while working in a field or cutting grass, but will lose interest as soon as the people stand upright. Consequently, it has been hypothesized that some attacks are a simple case of mistaken identity.
    Tigers typically surprise victims from the side or from behind: either approaching upwind or lying in wait downwind. Tigers rarely press an attack if they are seen before their ambush is mounted.

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    Early 1900's stereoview photo of famous Man-eater at Calcutta, devoured 200 men, women and children before being captured - India.

    Kenneth Anderson once commented on man eating tigers
    "It is extraordinary how very cautious every man-eater becomes by practice, whether a tiger or panther, and cowardly too. Invariably, it will only attack a solitary person, and that too, after prolonged and painstaking stalking, having assured itself that no other human being is in the immediate vicinity... These animals seem also to possess an astute sixth sense and be able to differentiate between an unarmed human being and an armed man deliberately pursuing them, for in most cases, only when cornered will they venture to attack the latter, while they go out of their way to stalk and attack the unarmed man."

    Champawat Tiger
    One notorious man-eating tigress, known as the Champawat Tigress, killed some 200 men and women before being driven out of Nepal. She moved to another location, this time in India, and continued to kill, bringing her total up to 436 before she was tracked down and killed in 1911. She was known to enter villages, even during daylight, roaring and causing people to flee in panic to their huts.

    The Champawat Tigress was extremely cunning, as man-eaters usually are. She was found by Jim Corbett because he followed the trail of blood the tigress left behind after killing her last victim, a 16-year-old girl. Later examination of the tigress showed the upper and lower canine teeth on the right side of her mouth were broken—the upper one in half, the lower one right down to the bone. This permanent injury, Corbett claimed, "had prevented her from killing her natural prey, and had been the cause of her becoming a man-eater.

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    Man-eater Champawat Tiger

    Tigers of Chowgarh
    The Tigers of Chowgarh were a pair of man-eating Bengal tigers, consisting of an old tigress and her sub-adult cub, which for over a five year period killed a reported 64 people in eastern Kumaon over an area spanning 1,500 square miles. The figures however are uncertain, as the natives of the areas the tigers frequented claimed double that number, and they do not take into account victims who survived direct attacks but died subsequently. Both tigers were killed by Jim Corbett.

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    Chowgarh Man-eater Tiger

    Tiger of Mundachipallam
    The Tiger of Mundachipallam was a male Bengal tiger which killed 7 people in the vicinity of the village of Pennagram, four miles from the Hogenakkal Falls. Unlike the Champawat man-eater, the Mundachipallam tiger had no infirmities preventing it from hunting its natural prey. Its first three victims were killed in unprovoked attacks, while the subsequent victims were devoured. The Mundachipallam tiger was later killed by Kenneth Anderson.

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    The Sundarbans
    The Bengal tigers of the Sundarbans (translation: 'beautiful forest'), bordering India and Bangladesh, used to regularly kill fifty or sixty people a year. This was strange given that the tigers were usually in prime condition and had adequate prey available. Approximately 600 tigers live in this region, possible the largest single population anywhere in the world.The kill rate has dropped significantly due to better management techniques and now only about three people lose their lives each year. Despite the notoriety associated with this area, humans are only a supplement to the tiger's diet; they do not provide a primary food source.

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    Man-eater of Bhimashankar
    A story was discovered by Pune-based author Sureshchandra Warghade when he ran into an old villager in the Bhimashankar forest which lies near Pune. The villager explained to the author how a man-eating tiger terrorized the entire Bhimashakar area during a span of two years in the 1940s. This villager was a police constable in that area and he had been responsible for dealing with the formalities surrounding the deaths (missing person reports and death certificates) and other jobs such as helping the hunting parties. During this time the tiger supposedly killed more than 100 people, but it was apparently very careful to avoid discovery; only 2 bodies were ever found. Several hunting parties were organized but the only one to succeed was an Ambegaon-based hunter named Ismail. During his first attempt, Ismail had a direct confrontation with the tiger and was almost killed, but returned to eliminate the man-eater. The tiger predominately killed the villagers who slept outside the huts.

    The authenticity of the story told by the villager was confirmed when Warghade examined official reports, including a certificate given by the British authorities for killing the man-eating tiger.

    Tara of the Dudhwa National Park
    While the Sundarbans are particularly well-known throughout the world for its tiger attacks, Dudhwa National Park also had several man-eaters in the late 1970s. The first death was on 2 March 1978, closely followed by 3 further kills.

    The population demanded action from authorities. As is usual in cases of this type, the natives wanted the man-eater shot or poisoned. The killings continued, each one making headlines. Officials soon started to believe that the likely culprit was a tigress called Tara. Conservationist Billy Arjan Singh had taken the British-born cat from Twycross Zoo and raised her in India, with the goal of releasing her back into the wild. His experiments had also been carried out on leopards with some success.

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    Experts felt that Tara would not have the required skills and correct hunting techniques to survive in the wild and controversy surrounded the project. She also associated men with providing food and comfort, which increased the likelihood that she would approach villages.

    Officials later became convinced that Tara had taken to easier prey and become a man-eater. A total of 24 people were killed before the tigress was shot. Singh also joined the hunt with the intent of identifying the man-eater, but firm confirmation of the identity of the tiger was never found.

    The debate over the tiger's identity has continued in the years since the attacks. Singh's supporters continue to claim that the tiger was not Tara, and the conservationist has produced evidence to that effect. However, officials maintain that the tiger was definitely Tara.

    Other man-eaters from Dudhwa National Park have existed, but this tiger remains the most famous man-eater of the reserve because she was potentially the first captive-bred tiger to be trained and released into the wild. This controversy cast doubt on the success of Singh's rewilding project.

    Problems at Dudhwa have been minor in the past few years. Occasional tiger attacks still occur, but these are no higher than at other wildlife reserves. On average, two villagers are attacked at Ranthambhore Tiger Reserve each year. These attacks generally occur during the monsoon season when the locals enter the reserve to collect grass.

    Man-eater of Changa Nala
    This magnificent male tiger, known as "Big Terror", was killed in the village of Changa Nala in northern India close to the border with Nepal. The tiger had wandered over a large area of India for several years, killing at least eight and perhaps as many as a dozen people. Travelers on the road, walking or on bicycle, wood cutters and forest guards - no one was safe.

    Dr. Denver Coleman of Pasadena, California, hunted and eventually killed this tiger in 1969.

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    Changa Nala Man-eater Tiger

    Tigress of Jowlagiri
    The Tigress of Jowlagiri was a man-eating Bengal tigress responsible for the deaths of 15 people over an area extending Jowlagiri in the extreme north, to Gundalam 30 miles to the south; and from the borders of Mysore State to the west. She was killed by Kenneth Anderson.

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    Kenneth Anderson with Man-eater of Jowlagiri

    The Tiger of Segur
    It was a young man-eating male Bengal tiger. Though originating in the District of Malabar-Wynaad below the south-western face of the Blue Mountains, the tiger would later shift its hunting grounds to Gudalur and between Segur and Anaikutty. It was killed by Kenneth Anderson, who would later note that the tiger had a disability preventing it from hunting its natural prey.

    Upon examining the carcass, Anderson noted that the tiger had one eye, the other having been badly damaged by a shotgun slug.

    [​IMG]
    Man-eater of Segur

    These were few of the maneating tigers which had horrifying celebrity status in India.

    Monish
     
  2. owenowen

    owenowen AH Veteran

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    Hi Monish,

    Nice thread !! By the way are tiger numbers starting to improve in India or is ilegal hunting still a big problem ? Are there special breeding reserves with game rangers and so on ?

    They really so pretty i wish them all the best !! :)
     
  3. monish

    monish AH Elite

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    Owen,

    Its very unfortunate that tiger population is dwindling in India due to excessive & rampant poaching for the body parts of this magnificient beast , today as per the official count we are left only with 1411 tigers in the wild.

    Lots of policies are framed in the airconditioned offices under Project Tiger by the bureaucracy but survival of this great cat seems bleak , only a well adapted & implemented anti poaching law can save this master predator for the posterity & and their better future.

    No breeding programme as such is underway . Tigers just are finding it tough to live on due to human overpopulation and decimation of their natural habitats.

    Sad very sad !!!

    Monish
     
  4. Skyline

    Skyline AH Fanatic

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    Until we..........globally............quit basing our economy on growth and find a way to not only halt our population growth, but reduce it, this will become the dying song of many species. This most noticeably hits the apex predators and our largest land animals first because of the vast amounts of space they require to exist in their natural habitat.

    I always hear these urban thinkers who like to plan our destiny, spouting that the security and safety of man comes first and we have to find a way for these animals and man to coexist while we continue to rape and pilage. I don't see it that way.

    What we all need......what the planet needs, is less people. In the back rooms everyone knows what really needs to be done, but greed, personal gain and glory, and a lack of political will keep it from happening.

    My wife and I have placed our land into a Heritage Habitat Foundation so that the land we own can never be cleared and for building or intensive livestock operations. It can only be used for wildlife and sustainable grazing. It ain't much in the great scheme of things, but it is the best that we can do as members of the middle class or 'little people'. I would encourage those of you who have farms or ranches and do not live in the urban jungle to do the same. Every little bit helps.
     
  5. owenowen

    owenowen AH Veteran

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    Hi,

    Yes Kelly well said. Our property falls in the Northern Cape and luckily we own the mining rights so de beers cant kick us off the farm if they happen to find a diamond pipe line :)
     
  6. monish

    monish AH Elite

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    Kelly.

    We all I, believe ,think and presume matters with our hearts , but all the benevolent thoughts and plans just are your & mine and we do wish all this should materialize in the real sense but it dosent , the worst hit is the flora & fauna on this planet earth and the man being the worst of decimator & eliminator. We being ethical hunters do wish to have the fauna thrive , but they are worst hit by humans and for which they can never complain .
    Tigers & Lions in Asia are the worst hit by humans for sinister gains for few which is for you & me is very tough to contemplate.

    The call of the Tiger , roar of the Lion & sawing of the Panther would very soon would not be audible at all if we humans do not think with sanity for the betterment of them all .

    May be the at times the heart rules our mind and that I believe is better for these amazing cats to live on forever.

    Monish
     
  7. AfricaHunting.com

    AfricaHunting.com FOUNDER AH Ambassador

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    Video footage of Tiger attacking man an Elephant

     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 28, 2014
  8. monish

    monish AH Elite

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    Jerome,

    This incident took place in State of Assam in Northeast India, the Mahout was Pegu who lost his 3 fingers, and the elephant he was riding was JOYMALA, who chased away the tiger saving the lives of Mr. Bodo the forest ranger & one forest gaurd who had fallen off the elephant when it attacked. . The ferociousness of a Tiger can be well seen in this footage .

    Thanks

    Monish
     
  9. AfricaHunting.com

    AfricaHunting.com FOUNDER AH Ambassador

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    Thanks Monish for all of the wonderful information!
     
  10. PaulT

    PaulT AH Fanatic

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    My closest personal freind is of Indian heratige and regularly provides me with anecdotes of the wildlife situation in India and like Monish points out, it is in a dire position.

    India is a classic example,(along with Kenya), of how exclusion to hunting does not work for wildlife.
    My mate's father was a founding member of the W.W.F chapter of their local region and many times we would discuss the relative merits of hunting/conservation, the one point he could never argue is that the ban on hunting in India has had no positive contribution to the benifit of the animals or the environment(infact could be argued legitimately that it has been to the detriment). Ofcourse in India's case the high population has impacted severely as well.

    Trophy fees, hunters contributions (concession fees) creates value in terms of real dollars, and as much as a lot of people want to ignore the fact, real value is what will sustain anything in this modern world. Very few (if any) of the other supposed interested conservation based groups can, or want to, provide the level of financial contribution, and hands-on management and protection that hunting can provide.


    What level of fiscal contributions have the eco-tourism and protectionist groups provided to the wildlife and ecosystems of India.

    With the total absence of hunting, why hasn't the W.W.F got the entire Tiger population absolutely exploding beyond belief ??

    It is my understanding that hunting has been banned in India since the late 70's.

    Why, if hunting was such a detrimental activity to animal populations hasn't the exclusion of hunting resulted in marked increases in the animal populations in such a long period of exclusion ???????????

    Where is P.E.T.A, Greenpeace etc.
    Why, in the total absence from the "threat" that hunting provides to animals, aren't they out there protecting the Indian Rhino, the Tiger, the Indian Lion (that has nearly dissapeared) the Nilgiri Tahr and many others in the same position.

    I see a similar threat to traditional hunting areas from the eco-tourism sector.
    Multi-national eco-tourism companies are buying/taking over leases/contracts of traditional hunting areas promising big revenue to landowners/governments. What seems to be misrepresented is the fact (that they are now learning in places like Botswana's Okavango) that the footprint per dollar return per person for eco-tourism is MUCH higher than the hunting footprint WHICH RETURNS A GREATER DOLLAR PER PERSON VALUE. Also the eco-tourism industry provides little deterant/control and management factor for the animals themselves, as opposed to the anti-poaching units employed by the majority of safari companies.

    Skyline, I take my hat off to you for the stance you have taken in protecting your land from development and agree with your sentiments regarding population control entirely.
    What depresses me so much is still the level of credence that is given to the emotive bunny huggers who have no grasp on the realities of true, effective, renuable resource management.

    Jerome, thank-you for providing that very entertaining video of the Tiger attack, but I wonder what the guest on that Elephant ride paid in terms of his viewing expereince ? Would it equate to what the current market Trophy fee for a Tiger would be. Just how far would a U.S $50,000 Trophy fee go in a place like India, to pay for anti-poaching patrols etc.(I'm not suggesting the re-opening of Tiger hunting, merely asking the question).

    Is it too late for India ?
    Are some of India's species too far gone, are some of the wild areas too damaged/populated ?

    I hope not.

    I hope to get over there shortly to at least experience what is left, and to imagine what it must have been like.
    In an eco-tourist capacity I expect to be contributing very little to the situation, obviously far less than if i were there in a sport hunting capacity !

    I certainly hope this does not occur elsewhere.

    PaulT.

    Thank-you for posting this Monish.

    My apologies for ranting off the Man-eaters of India topic.

    According to my good mate the only animal that seems to be increasing is the Leopard, and they have frequent issues dealing with those that "steal" their pet dogs and others that get even bolder by entering premises looking for food !
     
  11. monish

    monish AH Elite

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    Paul,

    Thanks ! A very well thought out response , true what all you mention is the situation here , and its tragic . This great cat the national animal of this beautiful country is on the verge of trailing to its dooms day . We all harp and make hue & cry but all this seems to be in vain as nothing seems to take charge to inforce the laws in a stricter manner.
    Hope to have this beautiful cat to live and survive as William Blake did write TYGRE TYGRE BURNING BRIGHT IN THE FOREST OF THE NIGHT . but the flame & the fire seems to diminish and soon would be extinguished if not we here take charge of the situation .

    Monish
     
  12. monish

    monish AH Elite

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    Maneater Tiger of Chuka - INDIA

    The Chuka Man eating tiger was shot by Jim Corbett in April 1937 ....

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    Monish
     
  13. Kiwi505

    Kiwi505 AH Veteran

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    Jim Corbett was one of the greatest hunters of his time, and, by all accounts, a great gentleman.
     
  14. monish

    monish AH Elite

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    Kiwi505,

    Agree with you totally , Jim Corbett was the greatest of hunters of his time & had defined the TIGER in the best way by avowing that " A TIGER IS A LARGE HEARTED GENTLEMAN".

    Monish
     
  15. monish

    monish AH Elite

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    Hunter Dana Brown & the man eater tiger he had shot......

    [​IMG]

    Monish
     
  16. bee keeper

    bee keeper AH Member

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    I suspect that in those times they called every tiger a man eater...sounded more heroic if you shot it ;)
     
  17. monish

    monish AH Elite

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    Bee Keeper,

    Every tiger was not branded as a man eater , but few created havoc by killing humans & taking up on them as a staple diet . Do read some authentic stories on the infamous man eating tigers by Kenneth Anderson & Jim Corbett ............

    Monish
     
  18. ZAGGER

    ZAGGER New Member

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    Hi Monish, great post indeed, impressive. Ive read man-eaters of kumaon by corbett great book. luckily I got it free, can you pass me any links where i could download other books of jm Corbett and kenneth Anderson for free.
    ............are there any book bout the Bhimashanker, and changa nala man-eaters. and also about Dana Browns hunt.
    ...........Zagger
     
  19. Kiwi505

    Kiwi505 AH Veteran

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    I don't know if you can download any, but you can search for them on sites like Abebooks, Addall, bookfinder, and others.
     
  20. ZAGGER

    ZAGGER New Member

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    Stalking the Books

    Thx Kiwi, searched but couldnt find any. I am still a student and do not have any provisions to buy those books online, so iam in true means become a book-eater.
    like a man-eater going for easy prey LoL, sp please some one help me with the books of (Jim Corbett, K.Anderson & others) please. I've searched for the full story of 'Man-eater of Bhimashankar' & Changa Nala maneater, but couldnt find any source. so please someone help me in getting them. Thanx All
     

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