KUDU HUNTING RESTRICTED - EASTERN CAPE

Discussion in 'News & Announcements' started by BRICKBURN, Apr 16, 2012.

  1. BRICKBURN

    BRICKBURN SUPER MODERATOR CONTRIBUTOR GOLD BENEFACTOR AH Ambassador

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    These are the proposed hunting regulations, including limits and seasons.

    This years final draft[/B] hunting proclamation for the Eastern Cape, released by the province's Department of Economic Development,Environmental Affairs and Tourism is focused on protecting the kudu population.
    This has suffered over the past few seasons as a result of drought, Rift Valley Fever, Wesselsbron disease and what farmers' associatios view as over-hunting.

    The proclamation curtails hunting of kudu in respect of the length of the hunting season and the number of kills per day. In general districts which previously hunted 3 months will now only be allowed to hunt for 2 months, while 2-month seasons have been reduced to the month of July. This includes districts such as Hankey, Steytlerville, Adelaide, and Middleburg. The hunting season in Aberdeen will be completely closed.
    A maximum of 2 hunters taking 1 kudu per property per day will be effective for all listed districts excluding Burgersdorp, Queenatown, steynsburg and Venterstad. In Pearston and Somerset East only bulls may be shot for the month of July.

    In the Tarkastad district farmers may allow a total of only 10 kudu to be hunted per property for the period of the hunting season, while they will be restricted to just 2 per property in Burgersdorp, Queenstown, Steynsburg and Venterstad.
    Prior to any hunting of kudu in these districts the relevent DEDEAT office must be notified during office hours of the intended hunt. The results of the hunt must also be reported within 12 hours after the hunt. No kudu may be hunted anywhere on commercial crops such as maize or lucerne.

    (Source: farmers weekly 17 Feb 2012)

    I wonder if this will trickle down to impact international hunters???
  2. KMG Hunting Safaris

    KMG Hunting Safaris SPONSOR AH Elite

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    Brickburn,
    This proclamation only covers open properties, ie. low fenced properties. There are no "seasons" involved on high fenced properties, with the necessary CAE paperwork in place, hunting is allowed all year round. So, unless, you are making use of any low fenced properties for Kudu, this proclamation will not affect international hunters at all.

    I agree with this proclamation entirely! Especially the last sentence of no hunting will be allowed in crops. This is probably the sole reason for the massive decline in numbers of Kudu on open properties. The shooting of Kudu by landowners in some areas over illegal hunting methods, like spotlight in their crops has seriously dealt the Kudu population a huge blow.
    I know of an area a couple of hours away from me, where the landowners took off in the region of 240 Kudu last year. All shot off his crops. This type of shooting is also non-selective, with Bulls, Cows and calves taking heat.

    But as I mentioned, this will not affect the international hunters in the least. Lets just hope that this procalmation will achieve its aim and get the Kudu population back to where it was.

    Best Regards
    Marius Goosen
  3. BRICKBURN

    BRICKBURN SUPER MODERATOR CONTRIBUTOR GOLD BENEFACTOR AH Ambassador

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    I know the proclamations are not for CAE properties in most respects. Usually where we international hunters are going about our hunting.

    The trickle down that I might expect would be the overall health of the Kudu population in general.

    It will sure effect those low fence properties that could be hunted in EC.
  4. KMG Hunting Safaris

    KMG Hunting Safaris SPONSOR AH Elite

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    I get where you are coming from. Personally , I dont think it will affect us at all, since strict quotas per year are adhered to. The shooting of whatever crosses the crosshairs scenario is what's damaging the numbers. As trophy hunters, only the biggest bulls are taken(all within the yearly quota), ensuring a continuous feed through of a healthy population.
  5. BRICKBURN

    BRICKBURN SUPER MODERATOR CONTRIBUTOR GOLD BENEFACTOR AH Ambassador

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    For you good managers! :)
  6. Wolverine67

    Wolverine67 AH Fanatic

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    I may be wrong, but shooting off females and young animals are also a part of management in a high fenced property. The problem with overhunting appare when especially old productive cows are decimated. Shooting calves seldom hurt the population. (if done within correct quotes).
    I also guess that some farmers like the population as low as possible, at least those with commercial crops.
  7. Bobpuckett

    Bobpuckett GOLD SUPPORTER AH Legend

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    I'm sure Glad I got mine in 2010 as mine was a free range Kudu in the Tarkastad area and this proclamation could have affected me depending on Quotas taken on low fence sheep farms if it affects the international hunters at all.
  8. Wolverine67

    Wolverine67 AH Fanatic

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    I also got mine at a low fenced farm north of Grahamstown last year. What strikes me, are that on that property it was a lot of kudu, and the ph said that there was in fact a bit too many, especially cows.
    Another thing. Are you allowed to shoot the same amount of animal whether you own 100 ha or 1000 ha? That sounds strange to me. I talk about open, free range area.
  9. Hotfire Hunting Safaris

    Hotfire Hunting Safaris AH Veteran

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    I feel that the restrictions were completely justified in the mentioned areas, especially due to over hunting.
    I like how people always try to differentiate between free range and enclosed animals, kudu dont have a problem jumping a high fence, I had a massive influx of kudu bulls once I had put kudu cows on my high fenced property. No matter how I set my breeding models, the amount of Mature bulls after 1.5 years was not possible. So does this mean that all Kudu could be free range?
  10. Jaco Strauss

    Jaco Strauss SPONSOR AH Elite

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    No it does not.
  11. Wolverine67

    Wolverine67 AH Fanatic

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    But does it mean there are a portion of mature bull moving in and out of enclosed areas in the rut? My ph in my Eastern Cape hunt last year told me that in the rut he saw bulls in the area that disappeared after the rut. He didn knew where they came from. Are there such a portion of bulls within a population which roaming around in the rut? I know that in a moose population you have some bulls that behave more territorial and then there are bulls roaming around in large area looking for cows.
  12. Jaco Strauss

    Jaco Strauss SPONSOR AH Elite

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    Would most definitely agree with your ph as far as limited movement on rutting bulls are concerned, but would be weary of generalizing.... Even the bull movement between high fenced properties slow down sinificantly out of rut.

    My best always
  13. Hotfire Hunting Safaris

    Hotfire Hunting Safaris AH Veteran

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    I have definately noticed the the trend of higher bull numbers in the rut, also once the "open season" begins, on non CAE properties, we seem to get more transient bulls and the odd group of cows. (not sure how the cows get in and out?) I think the key to kudu movements in and out of a high fenced area is dictated by the fence. In my part of the EC there are not as many high fenced properties with electrified top strands and am sure that that is the key factor in determining the Kudu movements. Eland also do not have any respect for the high fence.
  14. Hotfire Hunting Safaris

    Hotfire Hunting Safaris AH Veteran

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    As another determining factor for bull movements, especially in the rut, is probably due to kudu cow densities.
  15. Jaco Strauss

    Jaco Strauss SPONSOR AH Elite

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    Agreed, on the cows as well as the eland, they sure do work a fence line in spectacular fashion... :)

    My best always
  16. Diamondhitch

    Diamondhitch AH Legend

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    How tall of fence are the Kudu/Eland crossing? I have heard of Eland crossing high fence when pursued.
  17. Hotfire Hunting Safaris

    Hotfire Hunting Safaris AH Veteran

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    As the spec here in South Africa is 2,4m (8ft) the fences should be a definite barrier, but is seems to serve more as a deterrent. Generally the Eland Cows will strike the top couple of strands and either break them or roll over them. The bulls I have seen clear it like a pole vaulter with out even clipping the top strand. Generally if you fence on flat ground, your fence seems to be better, it is when you get into really rugged areas where the fence is built on steep slopes or against high gradients, they are more likely to jump. I have watched a kudu push through a fence just above the netting.
  18. Diamondhitch

    Diamondhitch AH Legend

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    I beleive it. Those wild Springbok I hunted this year were psycho, when ducking under the low fence a couple got caught on thier horns and rammed and flopped their way through. I assume that is where my ram broke the tips off his horns. Kudu probably have about the same tolerance for the fence.
  19. Hotfire Hunting Safaris

    Hotfire Hunting Safaris AH Veteran

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    Saw a hornless Hartebees this morning, another reason fences are a disaster to Africa

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