Kids and big game hunting africa

Discussion in 'Hunting Africa' started by Mark smith, Jul 31, 2014.

?

How old is old enough to bag an elephant?

  1. Any age as long as they are expertly guided

    36.4%
  2. Never, it's immoral

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  3. 10 years and over

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  4. 12 years and over

    9.1%
  5. 16 years and over

    54.5%
  1. Mark smith

    Mark smith New Member

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    1. Hi all, I was hoping that someone might know if it's in order to allow my 11 year old to accompany me on safari to Africa. He is adamant that he wants to bag either a hippo, elephant or lion! And if he could get away with it all three!!
    2. Is there any video out there of kids hunting big game? It would be good to show James what to expect out on safari.
    3. Any help advice would be great fully received, especially on the video side of things.
    4. Happy hunting guys
     
  2. Bobpuckett

    Bobpuckett GOLD SUPPORTER AH Legend

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    We!come to AH Mark! I think you will find here that any age is good as long as they have someone to guide them whether it be a pH or parent to show them the right way.
     
  3. accipiter

    accipiter AH Veteran

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    What hunting experience does your son have? What animals in your home country has he already taken? Feel free to show some photos.

    Welcome to the forum, but I must admit your post is a little suspicious. There are plenty of videos of AH members on here - that is the perfect representation of what it is like on safari.
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2014
  4. Spooksar

    Spooksar AH Veteran

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    took my youngest son on a plains game hunt at 14. I'm sure he could have done it earlier. Biggest things are if they are mature enough to understand hunting is not just killing. Also not all PH's are capable of guiding children so do your research.
     
  5. Bushman10

    Bushman10 AH Senior Member

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    The rifle that your son will use to bag a Hippo or Elephant would be of a significant calibre. My question to you would be - "How many shots can your 11 year old shoot with this rifle while instantly getting back onto the target after the first shot". Within that - "How accurate is he over shooting sticks at 50 & 100 yards with said rifle". I know many grown men that have difficulty and flinch with the recoil of a 375 never mind that of a 470 or 500 NE.
     
  6. ActionBob

    ActionBob AH Fanatic

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    First off this post looks suspiciously like an anti fishing. Especially with the survey.

    However I would respond to be darn sure this kid has been hunting something else and make him "earn" the right to hunt such big game. Has he had a couple years of hunting small game? Helped clean them and then eat them? As mentioned, does he show reverance for the animals and understand hunting vs. killing.... And I mean no disrespect, but do you Mark? Is this child being given anything he asks for or is he doing something extra to deserve such a privalage as to "hunt" such magestic animals.

    This is a privalage that should be earned... make him "pay his dues". Don't just let him do this because daddy or grandpa can afford it.

    There is a Nosler's Magnum TV episode 106 of a kid hunting buffalo. Quite respectful kid and a PH who is great with him.
     
  7. accipiter

    accipiter AH Veteran

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    I agree. The "Never, it's immoral" choice is a red flag. Someone with real hunting experience would be more focused on whether their son can shoot the 375 and higher needed for dangerous game. This may just be another anti gathering data for a high school book report.
     
  8. HuntingAgent.com

    HuntingAgent.com SPONSOR AH Enthusiast

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    Mark,

    Having been around the safari club for many years, I have seen and hunted with many young hunters who have been privileged in their lives. Unfortunate when you take all the big 5 before you are 15, I don't think you understand what you have done. There is little joy and emotion in it for these kids. Many of them completely stop hunting before they are 20.

    Hunting and killing deserve respect from us, as we age and work our way emotionally through the blood lust of youth, we appreciate the hunting aspect more than the killing.

    Watching a kid take an elephant then walk back to the car to play on his iPad, with any respect for the animal, is heartbreaking.

    Just my opinion.
     
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  9. tigris115

    tigris115 AH Senior Member

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    I think you should see how invested your child is in the hunt. Teach them about planning, tracking, learning to aim, how not to panic, and then dressing and skinning. If they seem interested, go ahead but if not, don't. This could also tell teach your child patience, appreciation for nature, and a few other things they talk about in them new age parenting books:p
     
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  10. ActionBob

    ActionBob AH Fanatic

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    And all this can be done hunting Impala... Or squirrels for that matter.
     
  11. Nyati

    Nyati AH Legend

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    Welcome to AH, Mark.

    Of course you can take your son hunting with you, a friend of mine took his sons with us in one of my hunts, and they shot small plainsgame. (impala, duiker, steenbok, warthog)

    I believe that´s the way to go, learn and appreciate what you are doing. They have all the time to hunt larger game later on. On the other hand, I very much doubt an 11 year old is able to shoot properly the kind of gun you need for DG.
     
  12. Limcroma Safaris

    Limcroma Safaris SPONSOR AH Member

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    I think everyone who has responded so far is on the mark... We are 100% behind introducing young hunters to the hunting lifestyle, and we have had the privilege of sharing those moments of elation, appreciation, and accomplishment of a first animal taken by a new or young hunter hundreds of times. It can be a deeply rewarding and profound experience to share within a family. However, with that, does come great responsibility. I'm not sure if starting out a new or young hunter on a big game animal, and especially one of Africa's Big 5, is the best approach for many of the reasons already stated.

    I think having your son accompany you on this hunt would be an excellent opportunity and a valuable experience for the both of you whether he takes an animal of not.
     
  13. Biddleman

    Biddleman AH Veteran

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    I agree. I smell a troll. Break out the d-con! Asking for videos to show his son "what to expect on safari". A few keystrokes and that can be found. However I do have a video I can share of my son hunting a T-Rex when he was 2.;)
     
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  14. BRICKBURN

    BRICKBURN SUPER MODERATOR CONTRIBUTOR GOLD BENEFACTOR AH Ambassador

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    Here are some helpful tips to coach your child to become less demanding and more polite when making requests.

    • Sit down with your child and discuss the difference between demanding behavior and polite, respectful requests. It’s appropriate for a parent to let that child know that he or she is being demanding and need to rephrase or change their voice tone when asking for something.
    • Let your child know that they are going to get some of their requests met with the answer “yes” and some met with the answer “no.” It’s okay to say “no.”
    • It’s important for parents to model appropriate requests when interacting with others. Parents who demonstrate demanding behaviors in front of their children only promote and reinforce this behavior. Talk to your children in a manner that you want them to speak to you.
    • Teach your child the manners of “please” and “thank you.”
    • Be calm and do not appear to be surprised when your child becomes demanding. Then say, “Is there another way that you can say that?” Sometimes children do not know that they are being demanding.
    • Do not give in to your child’s demands.
    • Ignore your child’s demanding behaviors. Respond to your child’s polite requests. Over time, responding only to polite behavior will reinforce the behavior expected.
    • Communicate with the other parent or adults in your family when your child’s behavior takes on demanding tendencies. This will prevent the child from going to others with their inappropriate demands.
    • Make sure that your child gets your attention when he or she is acting appropriately. Demanding children often display this behavior to get the parent’s attention.
    • Before bringing your child to the store or mall, review with the child your expectations of this trip and what you expect of them. It’s okay to let the child know “that we do not have the money to buy you a game on this trip to the store.”
    • Let your child know that it’s not appropriate to make demands of you in front of their friends or in public. Make a rule in your house that says, “When you make demands of mom or dad in front of your friends, the answer to the demand will always be ‘no’.”

    Read more: http://www.empoweringparents.com/bl...hild-12-tips-to-use-right-away/#ixzz39FOZaC5i
     
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  15. K-man

    K-man AH Veteran

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    Another aspect not brought up yet is the aspect of travel. How many pre-teens are capable of anything 8 to 14 hours long? Many adults cant do that, let alone a child. If a young hunter despises the travel they will not enjoy the experience.
     
  16. spike.t

    spike.t GOLD SUPPORTER AH Legend

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    most sensible stuff has been said, and i dont agree with kids at the age of 11 or older being taken hunting and being given any of the big 5 to shoot. they dont have any comprehension of what a privilege it is to be able to hunt these animals. as has been said start of small and let them work their way up and learn the ropes, and understand all that is involved. my son loves being out on the reserve and has had the opportunity to take a variety of species , but he doesnt get to shoot something every time he is there apart from birds. this trip on the last day we needed a bushbuck for meat for someone and told him he could take it, but sods law the only one we saw he decided was a nice trophy one and not one for meat, and said no to the shot. he is 15 in 10 days and would love to go hunt buff etc but he will have to wait a few years yet. i think its sad when kids are taken hunting and allowed to shoot everything and anything as they dont have anything to look forward to with any anticipation . its i shot this and that and sounds like they have been shopping, which to some extent it is......................
     
  17. K-man

    K-man AH Veteran

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    Isn't it amazing when our "hunting " advice turns out to be just advice for life, manners and growing up? All the more reason to mentor youths and let them blossom when ready.
     
  18. ActionBob

    ActionBob AH Fanatic

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    Hunting "is" about Life...... The anti hunters will never understand this.
     
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  19. broncolcj

    broncolcj AH Member

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    That's funny. Just today I was talking to my 11 yr. old son about his first African hunt with me next year. He said he would really like to take an elephant! Sensibly, I told him something like that would be some years down the line.
     
  20. Mark smith

    Mark smith New Member

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    And maybe you should teach yourself some manners, why on earth do you think I asked the question as to what age is suitable for a child to hunt. My son James is 11 years old for gods sake of course he's going to come out with what (very) serious adults think to be conceited or hung-ho type remarks.
    I cannot believe that you sat behind your computer to barate me in such a pompous and condescending way. You are totally out of order and should be banned from voicing your opinions to others.
     

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