Is the .375 H&H strong enough

Discussion in '.375 & Up' started by JOODOWD, Apr 14, 2009.

  1. hound_hunter

    hound_hunter AH Member

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    No problem with the translation Oscar.. And Gerhard said it best. But yes, I can agree with you a little more on an Eland sized animal. I was thinking impala and such (which still it seems like many on here would use a .375 on impala. Still seems like a ton of gun for a little animal, but hey, it gets the job done I guess.. no questions asked).

    Anyways, this has been a very informative thread! Very good discussion here.
     
  2. Mike70560

    Mike70560 AH Fanatic

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    I shot my impala with a 416 Rem, they do not run far with .416 hole through them:D

    This a great thread because I am probably a bigger gun nut than hunter.
     
  3. oscar1975

    oscar1975 AH Veteran

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    I have read on many occasions animal skin so fine as the impala a cartridge as the 375, the 416 etc because its tips hard and heavy, causing less damage to the animal to a lighter such as the 300, with expansive tip 7 mm calibre.

    Oscar.
     
  4. oscar1975

    oscar1975 AH Veteran

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    Hello, I read an article in a journal on the Rhino bullet of 380 grains for Rhino caliber Magnum 375 H & H and what classifies as a very good efficiency in hunting the buffalo. What have you tried?

    Thank you,

    Oscar.
     
  5. 35bore

    35bore AH Legend

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    Hey guys, I am new to this forum. I have been reading this thing since the original question. In my opinion, based on years of research, and experience, The answer is YES the 375 H&H has the stuff to take any of the big 5 and then some. Good points were made about shot placement, being able to handle the recoil, and waiting for that perfect shot. All of which I agree with. The point I would like to make is if you can afford a DG hunt in Africa, and can handle the recoil, why not take the legendary 375 H&H for plains game and DG and if the shot is less than perfect (even if you shoot 300 rounds a year practicing, it can happen) I feel I would approach the wounded beast with my 416 Rigby, for the clean up work. I have both calibers and I don't leave either one at home, when I leave with one, then the other comes with it. Sort of a family reunion.
     
  6. 35bore

    35bore AH Legend

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    Besides just another great reason for buying another rifle, not that a pro gunner needs an excuse.
     
  7. Ray Atkinson

    Ray Atkinson AH Enthusiast

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    The .375 is an excellent DG rifle if you can shoot well..It would be foolhardy for anyone to say they could expect a one shot kill with any caliber on Buffalo or perhaps any of the DG animals..It just does not happen with that much regularity.

    I have a 404, 375 H&H, 416 Rem, and a 450-400 Searcy double and I like them all about equally with a little preference for the 40 calibers but only if you can shoot them with the extra recoil they produce..

    BTW love the heavy for caliber Woodleigh softs, in the 350 gr. 375 and the 450 gr. in the 40 calibers and have used them on many buffalo and in fact I tested them in Africa for Geoff before he ever put them on the market..Handloaded they are an outstanding DG bullet in every respect. The PP is a tougher bullet than the RN, so I suggest using the PP for the bachlor bulls and the RN for herd hunting..
     
    Last edited: Apr 30, 2009
  8. Gloucester

    Gloucester AH Member

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    It's good to see so much informed comment on an important subject. I have a slightly different view from most that have been expressed and accept that I might be in the minority. First, I agree wholeheartedly that good shot placement is everything and it is always better for someone to shoot with a smaller calibre that they are comfortable with, rather than a larger one that makes them flinch.

    HOWEVER, I think it is down to the SPECIFIC HUNTING ENVIRONMENT as to whether or not the 375 H&H is up to the job.

    For example, if you are shooting Cape Buffalo in August with most of the grass dead and fallen and you have a clear view of the quarry at 40 - 50 metres then a 375 H&H is ideal. Contrast that with shooting in April where the grass is so long and thick that you can find yourself at spitting distance before you can see enough to get a clear shot. In those circumstances, I think a 416 Rigby is a better gun to have as it will give the beast a much more comprehensive argument. The 416 Rigby is a slow shooting cartidge that gives more shove than kick and should be able to be handled by most people who are comfortable with a 375.

    It's true that you would expect your PH to have a meaty gun to back you up if the need arises but I think a hunt should only be conducted if the hunter has the confidence and the tools to do the job: it's unfair on the animal and unfair on the PH to have an expectation that the PH will always save the day. It's the primary hunters job to dispatch as cleanly and humanely as possible.
     
  9. Shallom

    Shallom AH Enthusiast

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    Gloucester... very good point made. The terrain does have a lot to do with it. I would much rather have a .470 NE when going for buffalo in the long grass, especially when a wounded animal is being pursued - but am sure everyone agrees on that.

    For the first shot, we all usually work towards that ideal situation of good distance, clear path and clearly visible animal at a good angle - I know the .375 can do the job, but i for one, would rather have my .416 with me. If you HAVE the option of taking a BIG, thick skinned animal with a BIG calibre - do it! (being able to shoot the calibre and shot placement is a fundamental of hunting) For the likes of buffalo, rhino and elephant, I think only calibres over .500 are over-kill.
     
  10. Ray Atkinson

    Ray Atkinson AH Enthusiast

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    I must be the devils advocate today, and in reality I have never had a firm decision on this subject and my opinnion changes with a fair amount of regularity on this stopping gun subject..

    Given that escape clause, I think today I will say that I am perfectly content with a 375 or a 9.3x62 in the high grass or in the tightest of conditions as that is when I always opt for the brain shot as I feel that is the only thing that is going to stop them in the trenches and one caliber is about as good as another, as the hole size in the brain makes little if any difference as far as I can tell..So far this opine has worked for me and I can regroup from recoil much faster with these medium calibers, and perhaps most folks can shoot better with the light recoiling but very effective medium calibers...

    By the same token, everytime I have been in this situation, my first thought has been "why the hell do I have such a light rifle!!" and I'm wanting my .470, so there ya go..

    After all these years I still have no clue! :) :) probably never will!! :) :) but as I age I put less emphasis on caliber and more on properly constructed bullets and bullet placement along with practiced off hand shooting sessions, and yes the next time I get a close one I will swear one needs a really big big bore. :)
     
  11. Skyline

    Skyline AH Fanatic

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    Mike I agree............the 1.5-6 is the variable of choice for the .375.

    I have been packing a .375 for many years every year for months and it will take down anything that walks with a well placed shot and it certainly more than enough on the thins skinned stuff like lion and the big bears.

    IF you can handle something bigger and place the shots as precisely then I think something .40 and bigger is a BETTER IDEA for buffalo and elephant.
    Still, if all I could take for any of them was my old girl with 300 grain soft points and solids.....don't get in my way because I will have the utmost confidence in using it for anything that walks on this planet at present.
     
  12. TerryR

    TerryR AH Veteran

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    If you were planning a Safari primarily for Buffalo you would not be foolish to show up with a 375. You would be foolish to expect a one shot stop no matter what caliber you shoot a Buffalo with. The bigger the bullet, the harder it hits, but a 375 through the heart will kill a buffalo while a 700 thumberboomer through the guts will only piss him off.

    Disclaimer: I have personally shot only 2 Buffalo, one with a 375H&H, one with a 404 Jeffery. Next time I'll use the 404
     
  13. DUGABOY1

    DUGABOY1 CONTRIBUTOR AH Enthusiast

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    Gentlemen, the 375 H&H rifle is a "ONE RIFLE FOR THE WORLD" type of invention. The old 1912 three six bits, with proper placement and a quality bullet, will kill anything that walks, crawls, or flies. However, the 375 H&H is NOT a big bore, it is a medium bore, and is minimum in most countries for the big five larger than the Leopard. It is one of the all time best choices for the big cats in Africa, and India. It is adequate for all the animals in the dangerous group in the world and is probably the most suggested caliber for the client hunter in Africa for most things up to and including Cape Buffalo. I will say here and now, the only "ONE SHOT KILLS" I have ever had on cape buffalo have been with the 375 H&H, paired with a 300 gr Nosler Partition bullet, when the brain, or spine was not hit. All others have taken at least three shots regardless of caliber or bullet type, again when the brain was not hit!

    Is the 375 H&H my first choice for Buffalo hunting? Absolutely not, would I hesitate to shoot buffalo with the 375 H&H, again absolutely not.

    The caliber is light for buffalo, and lighter yet for elephant, and My choice would be something in the .400 class on up to the 500NE, preferably in a good double rifle.

    The old rag that says the client hunter is always backed up by a PH who usually has a better chambering for when the crap hits the fan! I do not agree with that line of thinking. When things go South, who made the rule that says the PH isn't going to be the one hit first, leaving you to pull his nuts out of the fire. It has happened more times than one, I assure you. When taking on dangerous game one needs to be prepared to defend himself, and the PH as well!

    There is a reason why this game is called dangerous, but more than that, they are unpredictable at times. To me this indicates the need for more than the minimum required for that purpose.

    The sky is not falling, and if you want to hunt with a 375 H&H because of it's great versatility, then do it, I have on many occasions.

    I have three rifles chambered for the 375 H&H cartridge, and that used to be my back up rifle for my bigger rifle, and served very well for plains game, yet was legal for the big stuff if my big rifle broke. All my 375s are fitted with quality iron sights, and scopes mounted in quality quick detach mounts that return to zero absolutely. No big game hunting rifle should ever be slick barreled with no iron sights. If something happens to that scope the irons can finish the stalk, or the whole hunt if need be.

    .....................Good luck, and good hunting with your 375 H&H:D
     
  14. AfricaHunting.com

    AfricaHunting.com FOUNDER AH Ambassador

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    DUGABOY1, Thanks for your great post on this subject. I found your post to be article worthy, so I posted it in the article section. This is what the site is all about, thanks to everyone for your valuable contributions and great discussion.
     
  15. DUGABOY1

    DUGABOY1 CONTRIBUTOR AH Enthusiast

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    Thank you Jerome, glad you enjoyed it!:eek:
     
  16. Shallom

    Shallom AH Enthusiast

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    Dugaboy... enjoyed it very much and in complete agreement with you on all points. Cheers!
     
  17. Mike70560

    Mike70560 AH Fanatic

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    Dugaboy is one of the good guys, he shares his experience and knowledge with us newbies without being condescending. I am glad to see him posting here.

    Mac, was that enough nice things for an invite to the pig shoot next year?:D
     
  18. Ray Atkinson

    Ray Atkinson AH Enthusiast

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    Ya'll welcome Dugaboy to the forum, he is a wealth of information and one of the all time good guys..I know him personally from SCI over the years, and he will be a consistent and factual contributer to this forum..

    As to the .375 H&H? In my curmudgeon stage, and having used most to the big bores on game, I have only one commitment.."hand me a rifle, any rifle,any caliber, and lets go hunting" We'll make do.:) :)
     
  19. derekwest

    derekwest AH Member

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    Shot placement is everything. If you can shoot a bigger bore and not develop a flinch, go for it. If you spot on with a .375, it should be enough for anything that walks...then again, I would always prefer a little more lead entering a pissed off animal at a higher velocity. Some animals don't take kindly to being shot at.

    I shot a Weatherby .340 mag (just short of .375 ballistics) for brown bear for a number of years but moved to a Rigby .416 this past season and was very impressed. The bear dropped flat dead in its tracks where similar shots with my Weatherby would have required follow-up shots. Bigger sometimes is better (but don't tell my wife).
     
  20. Ray Atkinson

    Ray Atkinson AH Enthusiast

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    Bigger is better? Well not so much in the hunting fields...I have shot too many Impala with a 458 Lott or 416 or other big bores and had them run quite a ways...only to see one fall in his tracks with a 223...One must shoot many animals to even make a decision on such things...I have also seen the opposite many times..so who knows? :)

    I gave up on this subject many years ago, today just stick any rifle in my hands and send me on my merry way, I will just make do....
     

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