Is it me or......

Discussion in 'Hunting Africa' started by jaeger, Aug 6, 2011.

  1. jaeger

    jaeger AH Member

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    We all hunt for the mystery, the intrigue and for not knowing what's round the next corner ...right?
    I find it kinda weird how people want to hunt a specific animal, how one individual animal can be sold, even ,as the saying goes 'photo can be provided'?
    Is this hunting? If you know what you're going to bump into it surely takes some of the gilt veneer off things.

    Are these animals actually 'wild' or are they simply feral?

    Are they being hand-fed so the 'hunter' can get an easy hunt?

    What is a hunt? or has money taken over from the challenge now?

    Why not fit the animal with a collar with a lethal injection that can be triggered by the highest bidder on an internet auction, they don't have to bother with the air fare, and getting all sweaty and avoiding the tetse and mosquito's and can 'hunt' the animal in their lunch break at work. As long as they have enough money then it's all fine and dandy? They pay by credit card, log in, press F11 and the animal drops as they can see from the live-stream broadcast of the whole operation. Two weeks later it's on their front room wall.
    Sounds like a silly idea huh? But how far from the truth is it?

    Wheres this all going to end?

    When hunting's too easy then it ain't hunting, its shopping.

    Just a few thoughts from an innocent bystander......

    Happy Hunting Folks...
  2. enysse

    enysse AH Ambassador

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    There are a lot of different ways to hunt in Africa. And 99% of the people offering hunts will never offer a hunt like you are referring to above. If you hunt on foot in Africa...even if it's in a fenced property...you are going to have to work for it. Those animals are all wired to escape predators like leopards, caracals, lions, hyenas...etc. (including humans!)

    Guys may hunt for a specific animal...sometimes it works, other times they get skunked! Anyone can take pictures of animals ahead of time today. There are trail cameras...that can be hooked up to the internet, by satellite. You can put a camera on a spotting scope....but this doesn't ensure you will be able to kill it.

    Anyone can make a hunt as hard or as easy as they want it. If you want a hard hunt in Africa...you can get it. The outfitter will have you pay daily fees, and you can hunt by foot and shoot animals that the PH picks as mature and OK. No outfitter is going to let anyone shoot whatever is around the next corner.

    Jaeger save your money and goto Africa...it will not disappoint!
  3. sestoppelman

    sestoppelman SILVER SUPPORTER AH Legend

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    I suspect despite his handle that Jaeger is not a hunter and thats fine. I agree with much of what he says. Way too much emphasis is placed on the trophy by some. Many are more concerned with how much the animals weighs, how big the skull, how long the horn etc. Some want a virtual guarentee of a certain trophy size before they will even book a hunt which I find ridiculous.

    Most of us want to hunt fair chase on large properties and prefer to randomly encounter animals as in the old days. Sometimes this makes hunting difficult as I certainly experienced on my last hunt where I did poorly. Other hunts were much more successful. And yes to maintain healthy populations of valuable animals especially on private land, animals are indeed bought and sold to provide hunting opportunities for all which in turn pays to maintain those populations. Its a win win situation for the animals and the hunters.
  4. Diamondhitch

    Diamondhitch AH Legend

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    With trail cameras out there everywhere hunting for a specific animal is becoming increasingly common. This does not make it easy. In fact many people who would have harvested a different trophy will pass waiting for the monster they know lives there, more often than not unsuccessfully. Knowing they are there is only the first of many hurdles to harvesting them.
  5. jaeger

    jaeger AH Member

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    Hi, Thank you everone for the reply. Stestoppelman, believe me, I am a hunter.
    I hope that people reading my post won't take offence as I was merely playing Devil's Advocate to wonder just if it is hunting, if you are buying that specific individual animal. Opinions are opinions, but , like i said, IMO I want to hunt wild animals. I have nothing against enclosed (?) as long as that ranch/farm is large enough to be classed as wild. After all, in nature, many animals are 'enclosed' by their very territorial behaviour.
    It's just one persons view and I know how many of our opponents would use 'canned' hunts or the buying of suchlike against us. Just one example is the 'Three day hunt for a 'rare' white lion'.
    Police from within and beat the anti's at their own game?
    Just one man's thoughts. And yes, I shall be going to Africa in 2012. I shall let you all know how i get on.....
    Happy Hunting...
  6. sestoppelman

    sestoppelman SILVER SUPPORTER AH Legend

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    No offense taken here. Glad to have you on our side.
  7. James.Grage

    James.Grage GOLD SUPPORTER AH Legend

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    What you are indicated is performed around the world...

    Cape Buffalo, Lion, Elephant, White Tail Deer, Antelope, Elk...Bird farms and the list could go on...

    From Trail cameras to individuals watching the animal 24/7...the target animal is tracked and the outfit know where the target animal is at at all times...Big Bucks flys in...hands a wad of $100 bill to cover the transaction and you drive out and if the clinet is a capable shot it is oner in a matter of minutes...(cash is king and check are usually not wanted as i was told one time bring plenty of cash..this is not my cup of tea)

    Jaeger has some good points...and could be closer than we think to what hunting will be like in the future...night spotlight...lighted scopes...lazer sights...where does it all end...and i think that is what was behind his question...
  8. timbear

    timbear AH Enthusiast

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    Guys who "hunt" like that make me angry - and sad. They have no idea what they are missing, or what hunting is all about. They might as well use the lethal injection collars Jaeger describes for all the difference it would make. I remember many days in the NZ West Coast bush, searching for deer that always were a little smarter than I, and going home empty-handed, sweaty, with wet feet and scratches from the bush lawyer, but they were great days anyway. Or actually shooting something and then having to carry 40kg of meat out (that part never makes it into the hunting magazine articles). Somehow the venison tastes that much better, knowing I have done the hard yards. Let's face it: very few of us have to hunt to survive (those that do rarely have internet access). We do it for many reasons, but most of us do it because we love being out there, and we love and respect the animals we hunt. Sure, there always will be a few who hunt "to keep up with the Jones" and for whom it only is about having the biggest trophy on the wall, but I believe those are the exception, not the rule. They are empty people. Fortunately, most hunters aren't, so I am sure hunting will stay what it is supposed to be in spite of those few.

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