If You Are Planing To Go To Zimbabwe You Need To Read This First

Discussion in 'Hunting Reports' started by AfricaHunting.com, Dec 26, 2008.

  1. AfricaHunting.com

    AfricaHunting.com FOUNDER AH Ambassador

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    If You Are Planing To Go To Zimbabwe You Need To Read This First - U.S. Economic Sanctions Against Zimbabwe

    American Hunters considering traveling to Zimbabwe need to read and familiarize themselves with the issued Executive Order imposing sanctions against specifically identified individuals and entities in Zimbabwe by the U.S. Treasury Department's Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC).

    This Executive Order prohibits U.S. persons, wherever located, or anyone in the United States from engaging in any transactions with any person, entity or organization found on this list which is compiled and regularly updated by the U.S. Treasury Department's Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC). This list also names properties where American hunters are forbidden to hunt legally.

    No American should have any dealing with anyone on this list or anyone associated to someone on this list. For more information please visit the web site of the U.S. Treasury Department's Office of Foreign Assets Control by clicking here, it provides a fact sheet with general information about the Zimbabwe sanctions program imposed by the new Executive Order.

    For the search result of OFAC's SDN (Specially Designated Nationals) List for Zimbabwe click here, otherwise to do your own search click here.

    Provide the OFAC's SDN List to your outfitter and have him confirm to you in a written statement that you will have no involvement with identified individuals and entities in Zimbabwe and that at no time will you be hunting on a sanction listed property. Criminal fines for violating the Executive Order or regulations to be issued pursuant to the Executive Order are severe. It is no guarantee of protection against prosecution.
    Last edited: May 2, 2014
  2. Western Expedition

    Western Expedition New Member

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    Fantastic People

    I hunted Zim in the fall of 2008 and also spent time in Vic Falls and Harare. The average person was simply fantastic. I was treated wonderfully throughout the trip. Everyone was so nice. The only stain on the trip was the cash hungry police that would stop our rig roadside at every chance and find a reason to ticket us and demand cash payment on the spot. It was a game and they never asked for much. Truthfully I found the staff at the Johannesburg airport far more threatening and forceful in holding my luggage hostage for a small ransom then anything encountered in Zim.
  3. owenowen

    owenowen AH Veteran

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    info

    HI,

    Yes its 110 percent true as we all know Zim is very corrupt at this moment and as posted above the police do hold many road stops and demand money, even during the day some roads are blocked due to this they make a lot money ...

    There are good hunting deals and offers in Zim this attracts hunters but be aware and make sure you use a good outfitter. Me myself i would stay away not only because its corrupt but i wouldn't stand for anything they offer since what they have done to the farmers and the lovely land of Zimbabwe and its people. Good luck and God bless Zim
  4. zimfrosty

    zimfrosty AH Member

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    Owen
    I would venture to say that Zim is possibly less corrupt than many other African Nations with safari / hunting clientele.

    Thank you for your good wishes.
    As one of the ex farmers who lost land in the so called Land Reform programme, I appreciate your comments of support . There is however a slight twist to the tale, as many of the ex farmers who lost land , are now involved in the Hunting Industry in Zimbabwe. Strangely, many clients avoid Zim because of the fact that the farmers lost their land and in so doing, may very well be hurting the very same farmers.

    I do believe that Zim is a great country and has an enormous amount to offer. In terms of the corruption, Ithink your outfitter or PH should be handling that , not you the Client. Things have definitely improved recently with Police issuing posters and handouts with contact numbers to call if one encounters corruption. I simply leave these on my dashboard when travelling. it seems to have the desired effect, and leaves the client and I to travel on freely.

    Hope we see you in Zim and hope you have a wonderful trip.
  5. ibie

    ibie AH Veteran

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    Last edited by a moderator: May 2, 2014
  6. zimfrosty

    zimfrosty AH Member

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    Folks I know this is a fairly old thread but I thought I would put on record what the legal position is regarding PAC hunting in Zimbabwe.

    It is illegal for a foreign national to conduct a PAC hunt under the Parks and Wildlife regulations . Only Zimbabwean nationals may shoot PAC animals . This is fact. A great many operators seems to offer PAC hunts , but reality is that problem animal control can ONLY be conducted by Zimbabwean residents. As PAC animals are spur of the moment issues and animals should only be taken in the act of actually crop raiding etc, it is impossible to pre sell PAC hunts.

    Management animals are another issue altogether. These animals are placed on quota by National Parks in order to control populations in areas where an excess of a particular animal is deemed to occur. Operators in Parks Safari areas and Communal operations will very often get management animals on quota. These can be pre sold IF the quota has already been issued by Parks. It would be very irresponsible of an operator to sell management animals prior to being given a quota.

    I hope this clears up any grey areas. If an operator offers you a PAC animal in Zimbabwe, it is illegal. If it is a management animal, then make sure the operator has received the quota from parks already. At this time NO management quota has been issued for the 2011 season in Zim
  7. AfricaHunting.com

    AfricaHunting.com FOUNDER AH Ambassador

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    Safaris Operators Association of Zimbabwe (SOAZ)
    Safaris Operators Association of Zimbabwe (SOAZ) is an organization with members that range from touring, photographic excursions to hunting safaris operators.

    Safari operators in Zimbabwe are required to be registered and licenced by the Zimbabwe Tourism Authority. Ask for your operator's number when booking your hunt and, if he does not have one, check his bona fides through SOAZ by emailing them at the following email address soaz@mweb.co.zw.

    Operators must hold a lease or agreement on a suitable concession with an approved quota of animals. They are responsible for the official paperwork and permits connected to the hunt.

    Bow and handgun hunting are permitted on an experimental basis, but require special permits. Black powder is legal provided the weapon complies with the requirements of the Third Schedule of the Firearms Act. This also applies to handguns.

    Hunting operators are required by law to provide the services of a Zimbabwe Licenced Professional Hunter to accompany foreign hunters in Zimbabwe. Licensing is undertaken by the National Parks & Wildlife Authority. Professional Hunters write a Learner Examination, and are then apprenticed to a fully-licenced Professional Hunter for two years. During this time they must pass a shooting test set by the Zimbabwe Shooting Federation and obtain an Advanced First Aid Certificate.

    They then attend a Proficiency Test in the field. Full Licence holders carry a plastic disc issued by the Parks Authority which shows their photograph, ID number and licence number. Learner Licence holders carry a paper licence with their details and a licence number.

    [​IMG]
    Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Management Authority (ZPWMA)
    A hunt must be organized and carried out by a safari operator that is registered and licensed with the Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Management Authority (ZPWMA). Safari operator are obliged by law to employ a licensed professional guide or professional hunter to accompany hunting clients into the bush.

    [​IMG]
    Zimbabwe Professional Hunters & Guides Association (ZPHGA)
    Zimbabwe Professional Hunters & Guides Association (ZPHGA) is dedicated to maintain the highest standards of professionalism amongst their members and are committed to the long term management and utilization of wildlife. However it is important to mention that Zimbabwe's hunting operators and professional hunters are not required to be members of ZPHGA to conduct hunting safaris.
  8. almostacowboy77

    almostacowboy77 AH Member

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    They were still doing it as of Nov 2010.
  9. AfricaHunting.com

    AfricaHunting.com FOUNDER AH Ambassador

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    HUNTING IN ZIMBABWE

    Here is a document that I just received from the Safaris Operators Association of Zimbabwe (SOAZ) that I wanted to share with you...


    If you are contemplating a hunt in Zimbabwe we encourage you to consult our website www.soaz.net and to deal with one of our members so as to avoid some of the pitfalls that have happened in the past to hunters who hunted with an ç ¥nknown?

    If we at the Zimbabwe Safari Operators Association can assist you with information please do not hesitate to contact us. e-mail: soaz@mweb.co.zw


    HUNTING IN ZIMBABWE

    GEOGRAPHIC LOCATION
    Zimbabwe is a landlocked country in Southern Africa comprising 39 075 700 hectares (1 hec. = 2.471 acres). It is bordered by South Africa to the South Mocambique to the East, Zambia to the North and Botswana and Namibia to the West. Altitude ranges from around 500 metres in the northern Zambezi Valley up to 1 500 metres in the Highveld, and slopes down again to around 300 metres in the south-east Lowveld.

    CLIMATE
    Zimbabwe's climate is divided mainly into Summer (Oct Apr. with temperatures around 32C) and Winter (May Sept. with temperatures around 20C but can drop much lower at night).
    The main rainfall is between December and March when access to some hunting areas can be restricted because of impassable conditions and high temperatures combined with humidity. The ideal hunting time is between April and October. Highveld areas may offer hunting year round at the discretion of the Operator. Other areas may also open year round depending on conditions prevailing.

    LEGAL REQUIREMENTS FOR THE SAFARI INDUSTRY
    Safari Operators in Zimbabwe are required to be registered and licenced by the Zimbabwe Tourism Authority. Their Tour Operator's licence number should commence with HOP Ask for your Operator's number when booking your hunt and if he does not have one check his bona fides through SOAZ. (e-mail: soaz@mweb.co.zw).
    Operators must hold a lease or agreement on a suitable concession with accompanying quota of animals. They are responsible for the official paperwork and permits connected to the hunt.
    Bow, and Handgun are permitted on an experimental basis and require special permits. Blackpowder is legal provided the weapon complies with the requirements of the Third Schedule of the Firearms Act. This also applies to handguns.

    Hunting Operators are required by law to provide the services of a Zimbabwe licenced Professional Hunter to accompany foreign hunters in Zimbabwe. Licencing is undertaken by the National Parks & Wildlife Authority. Professional Hunters write a Learner Examination, then are apprenticed for two years during which time they must pass a shooting test set by the Zimbabwe Shooting Federation and obtain an Advanced First Aid Certificate. They then attend a Proficiency Test in the field. Full Licence holders carry a plastic disk issued by National Parks which shows their photograph, ID number and Licence number. Learner Licence holders carry a paper licence with their details and a licence number. Only PHs licenced in Zimbabwe may conduct hunts in Zimbabwe.

    CATEGORIES OF HUNTING LAND
    Hunting takes place on various categories of land:

    State Safari Land. His is land in marginal areas, owned by the State and generally unsuitable for agriculture, but ideal for game: Chewore, Chete, Chirisa, Dande, Matetsi, Deka, Forestry Land. Big game occurs in these areas.

    Communal Land. This is traditionally held by indigenous people. The State grants authority to the District Councils to assume responsibility for the management and utilisation of the wildlife in their areas. With assistance from National Parks a quota is set and offered by Tender to the hunting operators. The successful operator markets the hunts abroad and the funds earned from trophy animals are paid to the District Council who distribute them to the families in the appropriate area. A portion is retained for community development such as grinding mills, schools and bridges. By placing a value on wildlife the indigenous people benefit and have an incentive to reject poaching. This system is known as CAMPFIRE and has been adopted by several surrounding states.

    Private Land. There are some ranches where domestic livestock may, or may not, be run together with game. Many ranches turned to game farming as game withstands drought conditions far better than cattle and are not subject to the same diseases. There are not many private game ranches left since the land take-over exercise, but some Conservancies are still operating. Care should be taken when hunting private land that the title deeds legitimately belong to the person offering the hunting. Clients from USA and EU could be prosecuted by their own governments for hunting on re-allocated land which has not been formally sold to the occupier. Care should also be taken that the occupier/owner is not listed on the USA list of persons it is forbidden to do business with. The US Embassy e-mail is consularharare@state.gov for those who wish to enquire.

    ANIMALS AVAILABLE FOR HUNTING IN ZIMBABWE
    The following animals may be legally hunted in Zimbabwe on permits issued by the National Parks Authority:-
    Buffalo, Cheetah, Crocodile, Elephant, Hippo, Leopard, Lion
    Giraffe, Zebra
    Bushbuck, Duiker, Eland, Grysbok, Impala, Klipspringer, Kudu, Nyala, Reedbuck, Sable, Steenbok, Tsessebe, Waterbuck, Wildebeest.
    Civet, Genet, Hyaena (spotted), Jackal, Wildcat.
    Bushpig, Porcupine, Warthog
    Baboon, Spring Hare, Vervet Monkey.
    Doves, Duck, Francolin, Guineafowl.
    Elephant carrying ivory in the range of 40-50 lbs average can be found in Zimbabwe with some 60 lb and over being shot each year.
    Most cats are shot on bait, usually in the early morning or evening. Night time hunting is not permitted on State Safari Land.

    CITES QUOTAS IN ZIMBABWE FOR ENDANGERED SPECIES
    National Parks applies to CITES each year for quotas of Elephant, Leopard, Cheetah and Crocodile. Animals that are present in Zimbabwe but not hunted because of low populations are: Rhino, Roan Antelope, Lichtenstein's Hartebeest and the Painted Dog (also known as Wild Dog).

    BOOKING YOUR HUNT
    Prospective clients should enter into a written agreement with the Hunting Operator in regard to: Daily Rate, Number of Days, Species to be shot if available, Price for each specie, Charge for non-hunting visitors, Cost of transfers from port of entry to point of departure, Arrangements for treatment and dispatch of trophies. Enquire whether any other charges are applicable.
    The Hunting Operator is responsible for obtaining the licences, paperwork and permits and supplying the necessary services to conduct a hunt: camp accommodation, catering, trackers, skinners, vehicles and a Zimbabwe licenced Professional Hunter.

    WEAPONS
    Your Operator will advise what rifles are appropriate for the hunt booked. A .375 or bigger and a medium calibre 7mm-300 HxH range are suggested as generally suitable for most hunts. Hunting weapons may be temporarily imported into Zimbabwe by declaring them, together with your ammunition, at Customs upon arrival and obtaining a Temporary Firearms Import Permit. This permit is checked upon your departure again. No payment is required for this permit.

    THE THIRD SCHEDULE OF THE FIREARMS ACT
    This states a calibre of no less than 9.22mm in diameter with muzzle energy of 5.3 kilojoules is required for Elephant, Buffalo and Hippo.
    A calibre of no less than 7mm in diameter with a muzzle energy of no less than 4.3 kilojoules is required for Lion, Giraffe and Eland.
    A calibre of no less than 7mm in diameter with muzzle energy of no less than 3 kilojoules is required for Crocodile, Hyaena, Kudu, Leopard, Nyala, Sable, Waterbuck, Wildebeest, Zebra etc.
    A calibre of no less than 5.l6mm with muzzle energy of 850 joules is required for Bushbuck, Bushpig, Impala, Reedbuck, Warthog.

    BIRD SHOOTING
    Some bird shooting is available but in smaller numbers than USA. Guineafowl, Partridge, Duck and Geese are available in appropriate areas in season. Doves and Pigeons are available year round in fairly large numbers. Bird Shooting and Fishing can be combined and arranged by your Operator. A good time would be February to April or August to November.

    FISHING
    Sport fishing in Zimbabwe offers the fighting Tiger Fish found in Lake Kariba and along the Lower Zambezi River. The annual Tiger Fishing Competition is held in September/October. Other species include Bream, Vundu (the ultimate in catfish), Chesa and Bottlenose.
    Bass fishing is available in privately stocked dams.
    Trout fishing is available in the Eastern Highlands in stocked National Parks dams in season.
    Catch-and-release is practiced by many Zimbabwe sport fishermen, but visitors are welcome to retain their prize catch for taxidermy work, which can be undertaken in Zimbabwe. Serious fishermen should bring their own tackle with them.

    ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
    Your Safari Operator will advise on suitable clothing and equipment to bring with you. Khaki and Jungle Green clothing is preferable. Military camouflage clothing is not permitted in Zimbabwe. Taxidermists of good quality are available in Zimbabwe or your Operator will arrange for dip and pack of your trophies for despatch to your own taxidermist.
    Electricity supply is 220-240Va.c. accessible via 14 amp square pinned fused plugs.
    A Tourism Levy is charged at 2% by the Zimbabwe Tourism Authority. Enquire from your Operator how this will affect the cost of your hunt.
    National Parks charge a levy of 2% of the trophy fee for preparing the export documents for the trophies. A further 2% on trophies is charged by the Zimbabwe Tourism Authority.

    HEALTH
    Malaria preventative medication is necessary. Please consult your own physician prior to coming to Zimbabwe. Use of insect repellants and concealing clothing in the evenings is recommended.
    Bilharzia is present in many dams and rivers. It is advisable to make minimal contact with this water, however Bilharzia is easily cured by a single dose of Biltricide or similar medication.. Please consult your own physician.
    AIDS is prevalent in Africa but can be avoided by refraining from irresponsible sexual behaviour. Medical Blood Bank serum and blood is tested prior to use.
    Medical Air Rescue and Ambulance Service is available in most areas of Zimbabwe and insurance cover for this is available. Your Operator can assist you to obtain this cover.
    Private as well as Government clinics, hospitals and doctors are available in the main centers, and your Professional Hunter has First Aid training.

    ACTIVITIES FOR THE NON-HUNTER
    Zimbabwe offers a wide range of other interests for non-hunters accompanying the hunter, or for the hunter once he has completed his hunt. These range from Canoeing the Zambezi River, Whitewater Rafting below the famous Victoria Falls, Houseboats on Lake Kariba, Fishing, Bird Watching, Photographic, Walking or Horseback safaris, and Game Lodges.

    OFFICIAL BODIES
    Our Operators make every effort to ensure your hunt runs smoothly and that you enjoy your stay in Zimbabwe. However, should you feel that you have been subjected to unethical practices or unreasonable treatment, you are welcome to make a full written report to the Safari Operators Association of Zimbabwe, or the Zimbabwe Professional Hunters & Guides Association, 18 Walter Hill Ave., Eastlea, Harare. Tel: 4-702402 Fax: 4- 705046 E-mail: soaz@mweb.co.zw, website: www.soaz.net.
    These Associations will only investigate complaints received against their members. Complaints against other Operators should be made to the Director-General, National Parks & Wildlife Authority Box CY 140, Causeway, Harare.
    E-mail vchadenga@zimparks.co.zw.

    SOAZ is able to help you contact Hunting, Fishing or Photographic Tour Operators.
  10. The Big Game Hunter

    The Big Game Hunter AH Senior Member

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    I hunted cape buffalo in Zimbabwe in 2012 and had a great trip. The government officials that I encountered gave me no problems and never felt in any danger during the two weeks I spent in the country. There were some minor issues getting my trophies out of the country after the hunt, but it all worked out ok. All in all, I would say that Zimbabwe is a great place to go hunting as long as you do your due diligence and make sure that you are hunting with a legitimate outfitter.
  11. Safari Queen

    Safari Queen New Member

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    My husband and I have booked a safari in Zimbabwe in 2014. In reading the "Land Classifications" above, it states that there are several areas approved for hunting. What Unit numbers are approved hunting areas for those areas listed. Our hunt is supposed to take place in Unit 7. We would like to know the legality and game abundance for this unit.
    Thank you
  12. AfricaHunting.com

    AfricaHunting.com FOUNDER AH Ambassador

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    I would recommend you contacting directly the following:

    [​IMG]
    Zimbabwe Professional Hunters & Guides Association (ZPHGA)
    www.zphga.com

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