How to clean a double after a rain storm

Discussion in 'Double Rifles' started by Hunt101, Dec 14, 2013.

  1. Hunt101

    Hunt101 AH Member

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    Hey guys, this is probably a dumb question I should know but I don't. I have a Heym 88B and I'm wondering how you guys clean your doubles after getting caught in a major down poor. Normally I would strip a rifle or shotgun down completely assuming it wasn't too complicated to make sure no moisture was trapped in the receiver to cause corrosion. Now I have no desire to try and pull my double apart, nor should I beyond a basic field stripping to clean the easily accessible areas. What should be done if anything to prevent or properly clean moisture out of the action on a double, if subject to a big down poor for a fair amount of time I would think water would work its way between the stock and down into the action. I have heard that some upper end doubles have gold plated internals for this very reason since gold won't rust.

    Anyhow any insight would be appreciated.
  2. James.Grage

    James.Grage GOLD SUPPORTER AH Legend

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    Some questions.

    Have you sealed the wood... i mean taken the gun apart and made sure all exposed wood is sealed. under the fore arm-taking hing off the forearm and sealed this area also.
    The stock make sure you have removed the pad and the area at the receiver.

    If you were caught in a heavy down poor and your rifle became drenched make sure you let the wood dry or you will crack or break your stock and forearm.

    Metal wise. i always take my parts and lube with a synthetic oil (yes some are better than others) usually found at good bike stores. And i put a synthetic grease on moving parts. Wiping away excess.

    Now if you have accomplished these things prior to the down poor just wipe and let dry. If not make sure your stock is loosened to prevent cracking or breaking.

    There is a good store out of Iowa that will be able to provide a good wood sealer and the lube.
  3. Hunt101

    Hunt101 AH Member

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    I have not pulled any of the wood off before other than disassembling the forearm for breaking the gun down. The stock has been treated with Woodcock Hill stock polish, but it has never been separated from the receiver so where it joins the receiver would be whatever treatment Heym uses at the factory.
  4. Cliffy

    Cliffy AH Elite

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    i know what I would do with my "cheap" rifles (and I mean cheap when next to a double, any double) I'd probably spray it down with Water Displacing Fluid Formula 40, after removing it from the stock, wipe everything dry and re-lube with proper lube.
    With a double, I wouldn't dare do that with the limited knowledge I have of fine doubles. There are some very well experienced DR guys here that I'm sure will be chiming in soon.
  5. AkMike

    AkMike AH Fanatic

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    The trick is to take measures before it gets wet. I use Johnson's paste wax for auto's and work it into the wood with the metal off (think toothbrush) and several good coats on the steel.
    I've been out in some nasty weather w/o problems doing this. Bolt guns or doubles that Johnson's is still the best!
  6. ornery

    ornery BRONZE SUPPORTER

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    AkMike is 100% spot on. I always recommend that my customers use car paste wax on their rifles. It is excellent for storage or foul weather. Good advice Mike!
  7. AkMike

    AkMike AH Fanatic

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    A buddy of mine's uncle told me that trick many years ago for hunting down in SE Alaska where we're in rain and salt spray all the time. Many years before these stainless steel guns showed up in the scene.
  8. DOC-404

    DOC-404 AH Elite

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    If you can get hold of Ballistol, put the rifle on some newspaper and spray it everywhere properly, twice. Leave it for a few hours and the wipe it down with a soft cloth. Ballistol is excellent on steel, wood and leather. I have have used it for many years, in general, and before and after wet weather.

    Home ï½» Ballistol
  9. Cliffy

    Cliffy AH Elite

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    Learn something new every day Now twice today right here!
  10. Red Leg

    Red Leg GOLD SUPPORTER AH Fanatic

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    +1 Nothing else like it in the world - even dissolves in water. And for those of you new to double rifles, DO NOT grab a screw driver and try taking things apart. Screws must be turned with a perfectly fitted bit. Anything else and you will bugger up the slots.
  11. Hunt101

    Hunt101 AH Member

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    Ballistol is very interesting sounding. So you guys with expensive doubles just coat the entire rifle high end stocks and all with the stuff? Also I'm confused about the dissolving in water statement, if it does how would it protect against rain? I was always taught growing up not to put gun oil on a stock as it isn't overly good for wood and always relied on a separate cleaner for wood. If this can do both it sounds very interesting.
  12. Red Leg

    Red Leg GOLD SUPPORTER AH Fanatic

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    I know - inexplicable. I discovered it in Germany in the 70's. Works great on leather, protects wood without hurting an oil finished stock, acts like a solvent in a barrel, and makes an impressive lubricant. I suspect it will heal minor wounds and snake bites :) .
  13. James.Grage

    James.Grage GOLD SUPPORTER AH Legend

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    Hunt101

    Everything in taking care of your rife is basically done prior to going into the field.

    Look at it 2 ways. If you are in doubt ask the gunsmith's at Kreiehoff and Perazzi on what they would recommend. I know i have and i have used there information for years in taking care of my fine guns. Plus i have the factory gunsmith go through my guns and make the necessary adjustments i have missed.

    1. Wood
    all wood is sealed at the factory, however a good 2nd or 3 coat of sealer is a good item to place on u- finished wood spots.
    Like the stock bolt hole, under the forearm and the wood that matches up to your iron receiver. Do not forget the but pad.
    All waxes are not the same. you should look at what museums use. some waxes are a cleaner also and will produce micro scratches on your stock, something i do not want. Use a real soft micro fiber towel and tooth brush to apply the wax and then buff it off, put on 2 coats. The warmer the wood the better the job of applying the wax, plus it is easier to apply an even coat to all the wood parts.

    2. Metal - Wax is one good way to go if you anticipate being in inclement weather. Wax works great if it is applied correctly to your outside metal on your rifle. and after you put your double gun back together to seal the lines where metal meet the wood.

    You should have a good knowledge of your trigger pull on both triggers (trigger gauge is useful here) and have that information recorded for later use. Usually a little synthetic spray oil and a q tip with quality trigger grease is all you need.
    3. Trigger and extractors or ejectors. Different on what to do depending on the temperatures you will be shooting.
    Now if warm and not freezing the extractors or ejectors are removed and the plungers with springs will be packed with a very good grease - this will not affect the operation of the ejectors or extractors. Grease will not allow moisture to enter the area, as rust quickly builds in the springs area. If you are dealing with freezing temperatures you will use a very good synthetic oil, wiping off all excess after letting sit over night to drain before reassembling.

    Trigger group, a very good synthetic oil - spray is all that is needed and let drip free and wipe off.

    Firing pins Warm to hot conditions. Fill the firing pin holes with synthetic grease and replace the springs and pins, this will not affect firing operations. works well for dirty area also however you need to take the gun apart and clean this area often. Blowing sand has the ability to fill the firing pin hole to the point that the firing pins will not make contact with the primer.
    For cold conditions just spray or oil with a good synthetic oil, wipe and replaced the firing pins.

    Different rifle makers use different trigger make ups and they are easy to service if you want to learn. The only one that i leave alone and it is the Krieghoff triggers that look like Swiss watches and then i am still able to clean them.
  14. Hunt101

    Hunt101 AH Member

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    Guys these responses are great, and James thanks for the detailed response. I would like to inquire about the wax options more, is the wax applied directly to the wood and metal, was there any process for cleaning off the gun oil on the metal and stock oil prior to the wax application? Once a wax application has been added, do you just re-wax ever so often, or do you apply a small coat of oil like normal. I'm getting the sense that if you switch to a wax option you move away from traditional oils on the outer metal surfaces? I've been doing more online research on waxes and it seems that it is used a bunch in the firearm industry, and until today I had never heard of it.
  15. AkMike

    AkMike AH Fanatic

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    Wax every thing with several coats just like the cans of paste say to do and you'll be fine.
  16. ornery

    ornery BRONZE SUPPORTER

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    Apply wax to all exposed metal, as you would your car! Repeat as necessary. Ballistol is a good way to remove the car wax. I probably have over 200 different types of gun-related chemicals or such in my shop at any given time. Some work great for one thing, some for another.

    Wood should be approached with caution. Depending upon the finish you will choose the treatment. My personal .270 Mauser Supreme....warmed boiled linseed oil. I have over 150 hours in the finish. It sheds water like a ducks back. Lacquer finishes....as one chap said, make sure the "blind spots" are treated.

    I would, however, take issue with the greased firing pin....opinions vary though :) Your gunsmith and the experience of the folks on this board should get you sorted!

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