Help!! Need Help figuring tip out.

Discussion in 'Hunting Africa' started by mcdowelr, Aug 21, 2010.

  1. mcdowelr

    mcdowelr AH Senior Member

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    OK, I am leaving October 9th with my family to go to Zimbabwe on my first African Safari. I am hunting Cape Buffalo 1x1 and the cost of my package is $9500. My wife has a Plains game package booked 1x1 for $5000. I have read 10 percent is the normal amount I should allow for a tip, and I have that put aside. But who gets what? What I am worried about is tipping the camp staff, trackers, drivers. Who should get's what as long as everyone does their job well? Should I take more than 10 percent? What have you guys done? We have two PH's, how should we handle that?
     
  2. nkjonas

    nkjonas AH Senior Member

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  3. daggaboyblog

    daggaboyblog AH Veteran

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    I have a different approach to tipping and I hope not to get blasted by those who disagree! I have hunted with 8 different PH's and tipped half of them without any acknowledgment or thanks - rather it was expected. Didn't like that attitude at all.

    A couple of PH's I have hunted with in Zimbabwe specifically requested that I do not tip them, but that I needed to ensure that I looked after all of the staff in camp and our team of trackers and skinners. I liked this approach.

    And I always keep a few dollars spare in case of a situation that requires an extraordinary effort. I hit a Chobe Bushbuck we had been hunting for sometime when he walked out onto a dry sandy riverbed. It was a long shot but he was hit hard, cartwheeled, then vanished into thick thorn bush. No blood. We looked till way after dark, but had to return to camp to avoid a lion or leopard encounter. Next morning I put up $100 to the man who found the animal - no sleeping in today, everyone was up and when we got to the spot, the men spread out and sweeped the area, every square inch. Needless to say he was found after a couple of hours buried 6ft deep in thorn bush where he had "dug himself in" and died. It took six men to pull him out and they lifted him over head and passed him down a chain gang. An extraordinary effort that deserved a reward. The excitement in camp was tangible as we had all worked together - and their was a genuine return for their efforts.
     

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