Choose Your Weapon with Jim Burnworth

Discussion in 'Firearms & Ammunition' started by Saul, May 17, 2014.

  1. enysse

    enysse AH Ambassador

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    Yes, you bring up a excellent point about the brass matching the rifle? Wonder if one of the gun expediting companies fixed the problem.
     
  2. Velo Dog

    Velo Dog AH Fanatic

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    Greetings Enysse,

    I doubt it since I'm under the impression they'd have to convince their Legislature to change their National Law.
    Politicians over there are no doubt just as stubborn and corrupt as they are in our country.
    Quite frankly, anyone who finds wildcat cartridges interesting, would be advised to leave them at home for a couple reasons, including the above.
    African countries ain't no Kansas Dorothy.

    Out,
    Velo Dog
     
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  3. drew416

    drew416 AH Senior Member

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    I have experience with this. It is hard, in Australia to track down 8mm Rem Mag brass. Easy to neck down and fire form 375H&H though, which is what I do. Managed to scrounge 100 new Remington cases for my trip to Zim last year, and to have spare for future. Only when coming through Customs back into Australia did someone check that the caliber stamped on the barrel was what was on the headstamp of the brass.

    Back on topic- I am sure that there are over a dozen better suited and cheaper to run, easier to obtain Plains Game cartridges already in full factory production.
    In Australia the 338 lapua brings on all the alarm bells with weapons registry. Yet no problems with a 338 RUM or 340 Weatherby. I am sure the only reason people want one is because the authorities don't like you to have one. With the cost to run and red tape involved you see them for sale 2nd hand on the usedguns website all the time.
     
  4. enysse

    enysse AH Ambassador

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    Someday, I may get to hunt Marco Polo sheep but on that day I will be deciding on the .325 WSM or the 7mm Ultra Mag. The choice will likely come down to which gun I can shoot better at long distance. I don't have a range that covers over 400 yards right now so I have no idea how they shoot past 350 yards.
     
  5. Saul

    Saul AH Veteran

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    Great, now you are once again getting me thinking about getting a .338 Lapua!!!
    I like your comparison to the .375 H&H. Is the recoil similar? If so, then it seems Mr. Burnworth isn't as far off of the reservation as previously thought. Honestly, in just about every African plains game hunting article, someone says that the .375 H&H is a great caliber. Wouldn't it make sense then to have a rifle that mimics its ballistics but can reach out to any range? In fact, it sort of seems like the ultimate plains game caliber. Think of it this way, one of the big knocks on hunting with the lapua is the massive overkill. This is true when hunting for meat in the states, but when in Africa and your goal to get trophies, then wouldn't this cartridge be perfect for trying to ensure that your trophy is DRT than say a 300 weatherby? Second of all, people say it is too expensive. Well so is just about every weatherby cartridge.
    Just because I wanted to, I contacted weatherby to see if they would rechamber a vintage Mark V from .300 wby to .338 lapua and they said that they would do it for under $500. That's a pretty good deal.
     
  6. Norwegianwoods

    Norwegianwoods SILVER SUPPORTER AH Elite

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    Personally I think the .338 Lapua kicks more than .375 Ruger, .375 H&H and .375 Weatherby, but not as much as the .378 Weatherby(only fired one rifle in this cartridge, so hard to compare).
    The downrange ballistics of the .338 Lapua is clearly better than all above because it shoots bullets with much higher BC.
    225 grain .338 barnes ttsx has 0.514 bc, 265 grain .338 barnes ttsx has 0.575 bc and a 250 grain .375 barnes ttsx has 0.424 bc.

    I really don't think the .338 Lapua is the ultimate plains game caliber at all unless you plan to shoot most of your animals at 400 yards and longer.
    And to shoot a .338 Lapua at 400 yards and longer demands very much practice with it at long range.
    And you will wear out your barrel rather fast when using max loads(as you should when shooting a .338 Lapua).
    I promise you that it will be expensive unless you are sponsored :)

    Inside 400 yards most people will be much better off with a less recoiling cartridge.
    And if I wanted to use a hard hitter on plains game inside 300 yards, I would rather use my .375 Ruger that is legal for anything :)
     
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  7. Johnny7604

    Johnny7604 BRONZE SUPPORTER AH Veteran

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    Me and my big mouth. The .338 Lapua will kick a little bit more than the .375 H&H. I use the .338 Lapua because I do alot of long range target shooting including practical competitions. It is just convenience that it works well for certain hunting applications. If I was choosing a dedicated hunting rifle it certainly would not be a .338 Lapua.

    The .375 H&H will still be a better choice for a do-all rifel as it is legal for dangerous game where as .338's are not. If you are hell bent on getting a .338 caliber than I would suggest the .338 winchester. It is waaayyyy cheaper for ammunition, and will do everything the .338 Lapua will do at 500 yards and under.

    In point of fact the .375 H&H would be a great cartridge out to 500 yards or so with one of the higher BC bullets. Slap a TTSX, GMX or Accubond in the end and you would have a pretty flat shooting plains game slayer. I think the only reason the .375 H&H isn't a more popular cartridge at distance is because from what I can see most people haven't tried it like that. The same goes for the 338 winchester. For some reason people have an idea in their head that they are no good beyond a couple hundred yards.

    I'm not telling you that getting the .338 Lapua is a bad idea, God knows maybe if more people shoot it the prices of brass might come down a bit. There is however better options for hunting.
     
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  8. Johnny7604

    Johnny7604 BRONZE SUPPORTER AH Veteran

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    I forgot to give Norwegianwoods credit in my post I think I just reiterated everything he said. So ya....what he said.
     
  9. Velo Dog

    Velo Dog AH Fanatic

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    Norwegianwoods,

    As usual, you have spoken wise words.

    Skal,
    Velo Dog.
     
  10. Saul

    Saul AH Veteran

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    I think the brass is a great point. On a new episode of the show, Mr. Burnworth and Mr. Bunney were hunting waterbuck. Mr. Bunney chose the .375 H&H while Mr. Burnworth chose the .338 Tejas, which is a .300 RUM that has been improved and necked up to the .338. I can see how it would be difficult to explain why your .338 Tejas rifle has .300 RUM marked brass, has a .338 bullet, an has an improved shoulder that looks nothing like the .300 RUM.
    It was rather funny, though, hearing them try to justify such huge cartridges for waterbuck by going on and on about how ridiculously hard it is to kill one and how they needed big guns in case they were attacked by dangerous game.
    I felt bad for the PHs because they were shooting huge guns and took ALL of the credit for the animals. Mr. Bunney made it a point to say how the PH couldn't find a bull but he saw were they were and was able to guide the PH through the area and find a huge bull.
     
  11. Velo Dog

    Velo Dog AH Fanatic

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    Saul,

    It seems like every time I arrive in Africa, and I get my turn to do the gun permit thing, someone wearing a uniform and a frown, opens one or sometimes both of my cartridge boxes and compares one of head stamps to the chamber markings on my rifle chamber.

    And, if my memory serves correctly (spotty sometimes) it seems like they also stare at my paper work for same every time, (paperwork issued by whatever firearms expediting service I used, as well as my US Customs paper for my weapon and binoculars, etc. - US Customs form 4457 ? - or some number like that).

    My luck seems to often run a bit parallel with Murphy's Law so, I will never try to bring anything that will draw the attention of some person who is equipped with a Glock, a badge and small IQ.

    Once I rented a house to a USA Homeland Security man and his wife for 3 years.

    I say that if Foreign Officials are even 2 or 3 times as smart as that big-bellied mouth breather, we would be simply begging for a misunderstanding, by bringing anything that could remotely confuse them at their ports of entry.

    (Hopefully, my former renter is not representative of that outfit, in other words how not so secure our homeland apparently is).

    Cheers,
    Velo Dog.
     
  12. Norwegianwoods

    Norwegianwoods SILVER SUPPORTER AH Elite

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    Well Velo Dog, I guess they have a natural distrust regarding you Americans ;)

    I remember when I was flying out from Kimberly in 2011 and I waited for them to check my gun when checking in.
    There was two American hunters before me and when the man checking the gun opened the bolt on one of the guns, a unfired cartridge came out from the chamber and the magazine was full :eek:
    When it was my turned, I said to the man that I was surprised he didn't react more than he did when he emptied the gun.
    Then he opened up a drawer and took out a big plastic box full of cartridges he had got in the same way as from the hunter before me.
    Found either in the chamber or the magazine or both.

    I must admit I was in total chock of it all.
    If things like this is common, I totally understand why they check everything properly.
     
  13. Velo Dog

    Velo Dog AH Fanatic

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    Hi again Norwegianwoods,

    I suppose I cannot blame people outside The USA for generalizing the culture here and distrusting people bearing firearms from here.
    We do the same thing.
    Furthermore, some of my countrymen (like the one you encountered) seem to shame the rest of us USA types every chance they get.

    I have seen it myself in person, when traveling.
    Also, I have seen it on television, in USA syndicated hunting shows.
    My favorite so far was an episode of "Nosler's Magnum TV" wherein the Host shot his PH with a 500 grain Nosler solid through the shoulder/upper back (he lived but I will guess his shoulder joint was badly smashed).
    The TV Show Host's rifle was a bolt action .458, complete with a totally inappropriate / huge inter-galactic telescope (no wonder he thought the PH was a buffalo).
    Very embarrassing gun handling, to put it mildly.

    However, my original point was not that.
    My point was that; I was trying to make it clear to anyone who may not have traveled to Africa before......that The Officials are not likely to be interested in wildcat cartridge conversions and many countries there have strict laws against bringing ammunition that is not the same cartridge as the rifle uses and that is listed on your Temporary Import / Export Permit.

    I repeat myself when I say that; even if Gov't Officials in other countries are 2 or 3 times smarter than their counter parts in The USA , we are likely still in dire straights if we try to bring anything into their points of entry that, does not fit the markings on the weapon and/or the paperwork for same.

    In the opinion of those types of people, your ammunition is what the head stamp says it is and that is that.
    One can talk all day about having necked down some 700 NE brass to shoot carpet needles or whatever but, people not interested in reloading will not likely be very sympathetic.

    Cheers,
    Velo Dog.
     
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2014
  14. Norwegianwoods

    Norwegianwoods SILVER SUPPORTER AH Elite

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    I understood what your point was in the post :)
    It just reminded me of my experience in Kimberly.
    And for the record, I far from think that most Americans are like that man :)

    I have a 6.5-05 that is my favorite gun and is the gun I want to take with me if I am to hunt PG with a gun again in Africa.
    But I hesitate about it because I am worried about getting into such a situation you describe.
    The head stamp says 30-06 and my gun license says 6.5-06.
    Not sure how that goes if they decide to check my ammo.

    Anyone knows for sure what might be worse case scenario if so happens?
     
  15. AZDAVE

    AZDAVE AH Senior Member

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    338 Lapua or wild cat for a new shooter??? I have several 338 WM and up rifles I bought from new guys that couldn't take the recoil and develop a major flinch.My opinion that is irresponsible advice. Military s all over the world are going to is because it shoots flatter than a 50BMG lighter to hump through the hills and is very good for two legged predators.
     
  16. Johnny7604

    Johnny7604 BRONZE SUPPORTER AH Veteran

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    I would put forward that neither are good choices for an inexperienced marksman. My reasoning is that the most important thing for a new shooter other than some proper instruction is practice and lots of it. I typically advise new shooters go for a cartridge that will allow them to shoot large volumes of ammunition with minimal physical or monetary impact.

    While not as glamorous as the lapua or super high velocity uber-magnum wildcat cartridges the old .308 is available in quantity anywhere, easy to shoot and won't break the bank.

    I'd rather be partnered up with a shooter that can drill a popcan at 200 meters under field conditions with their trusty .308 than a guy that has never pulled their rifle off the bench because it too expensive or hard to find ammunition.

    But what do I know.

    Cheers,

    John
     
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  17. Velo Dog

    Velo Dog AH Fanatic

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    Hello Johnny7604,

    My opinion is that you know plenty.
    That whole notion of fast/hard recoiling wildcat or semi-rare cartridges is for advanced experimenters, tinkerers, re-inventors of the wheel, chasers of moon beams and such likes.
    I'm waiting for Jim Burnworth to endorse some high-technology product for hunting bigfoot.

    I agree with you on the .308 for new shooters.
    (The 6.5x55 is another good one but ammunition availability is not very good at all.)
    Also, I would ad that the .30-06 is another pretty good recommendation for new shooters for the same reasons that the .308 is a good or better recommendation.

    The .30-06 has the capability of using 220 grain bullets if needed.
    But the draw back to a .30-06 is that now and then I have run across one that was not especially accurate (I typically buy used rifles) but, I do not recall the same for any .308 I have tried.

    The .308s seem to be consistently accurate, very important to keep the new shooter/hunter from becoming frustrated.
    For that, I would lean toward the .308 for a new hunter, just slightly more that the .30-06.
    Great minds think alike.

    Out,
    Velo Dog.
     
  18. Norwegianwoods

    Norwegianwoods SILVER SUPPORTER AH Elite

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    Here in Europe and specially in Norway, I consider the 6.5x55 to be the perfect cartridge for new shooters and hunters.
    And it is still a great one for the more seasoned shooter and hunter.
    Very low recoil and great accuracy combined with high BC and SD bullets that does a good to great job on most animals.
    Here it is also very easy to get ammo for.
     
  19. Saul

    Saul AH Veteran

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    Jim Burnworth is back at it again in the latest episode of Choose Your Weapon.
    He is once again using the Cross Canyon Arms rifle chambered in their .338 Tejas cartridge for hunting elk. He claims that it is the most capable rifle and caliber combination he has ever hunted with.
    Mr. Burnworth then goes on to recommend using a Nightforce 8-32x56mm scope for the hunt.
    He is still claiming ridiculous performance out of the Tejas cartridge. Supposedly, by changing the shoulder angle of a .300 RUM brass and necking up to the .338, the cartridge is easily capable of pushing a 300 grain bullet at 3,000 FPS. Call me cynnical, but I find this claim very hard to believe. If it was true, then why didn't Remington just do that for the .338 RUM and why do people even use the .338 Lapua anymore?
    I tried to clear this up by emailing Cross Canyon Arma about the performance of the .338 Tejas when I first saw Jim Burnworth use it. It's been about a month now with no reply.
    Anyway, this latest episode of Mr. Burnworth using ridiculously inappropriate gear and making even more ridiculous claims about wildcat cartridges, to then actually recommend it to hunters for elk is just (dare I say it again) ridiculous. This just goes to show how far hunting tv shows will go these days to sell products and generate more viewers. This is exactly why I appreciate Jim Shockey's "Uncharted" even more now. He seems to be the only hunter on tv now who actually cares about hunting and not ratings.
     
  20. enysse

    enysse AH Ambassador

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    I guess I'm sick and tired of all the 500 + yard shots and sniper rifles. No one wants to hunt anymore.
     
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