Chinese Men Caught with Rhino Horns and Leopard Hide at Hosea Kutaka Airport - Windhoek

Discussion in 'News & Announcements' started by safari gal, Mar 25, 2014.

  1. safari gal

    safari gal SPONSOR AH Veteran

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2010
    Messages:
    240
    Likes Received:
    4
    My Photos:
    41
    Member of:
    Safari Club International, Dallas Safari Club, Wild Sheep Foundation, Boone & Crockett Club, PHASA
    Hunted:
    Zimbabwe, South Africa, Namibia, Tanzania, New Zealand, Argentina and throughout North America
    A friend from Namibia just sent me this so I translated it to English and thought I would post - glad they were caught - what a shame!

    Republikein.com.na
    Published on Republikein.com.na ( Republikein.com.na | Jou land. Jou taal. Jou koerant. )
    Home > Three Chinese with rhino horns found on airport
    Three Chinese with rhino horns found on airport

    Submitted by Republican on Tue, 2014-03-25 08:21
    Francoise Steyn Berg - Three Chinese men yesterday morning with 14 rhino horns of various sizes and a leopard in their luggage at the International Airport Hosea Kutako caught and arrested. The three suspects will appear in the Windhoek Magistrate's Court on a charge of possession of specially protected resources, namely the horns of both black and white rhino and a leopard-knit. The three men were respectively 53, 49 and 30 years old. According to the spokesperson of the Namibian police commissioner. Edwin Kanguatjivi, the three Chinese yesterday at 07:40 arrested after airport police and their luggage scanned using X-ray illegal items into two suitcases noticed. In a bag was 10 rhino horns and four other bag rhino and a leopard-knit. There was no effort to stop the illegal items not properly hidden. It was only in female clothes wrapped. The three Chinese were the airport on the way to Hong Kong International Airport via the O. Tambo in Johannesburg. This is not their first visit to Namibia. "According to their passports China they left on March 9 and Zambia on March 10 entered. They Wenela Namibia at the border post near Katima Mulilo in Zambia came," said Kanguatjivi at a media briefing. "They entered the country with tourist visas to visit after their passports had all three Namibia last year and began this year to visit." Police could not confirm whether the horns of rhinos poached in Namibia or Zambia is not coming. "If the rhinos of Namibia, the country has lost seven rhinos," the head of the police unit of protected resources, Chief Inspector Barry de Klerk said. "Maybe they have a time or two managed to renostershorings out of the country and smuggling thought they would get away again., We know for a fact that the final beneficiaries of Chinese rhino horn," De Klerk said. According to him, the value of the rhino unknown and must first be approved by the Ministry of Environment and Tourism weighed, but the horns are apparently at approximately $ 41,000 per kilogram sold. A language problem makes it difficult to examine the Chinese and the help of a Chinese interpreter was called yesterday afternoon. "If the Chinese do business, they can speak English, but when they are questioned, they suddenly do not understand English or speak it," said Kanguatjivi. The latest arrest allows warning lights for the increase of poaching in the country flickering, especially with two black rhinos end of last year in the Karibib district stripped and a Chinese businessman from Oshakati, mr. Djin Xu (32), which in February Opuwo during a police in possession of two rhino horns from about 6.8 kg worth N $ 100 000 were arrested. He is on bail of N $ 20,000 bail and again on 4 April in Opuwo court on a charge of dealing in controlled game products appeared. Several Chinese were last year in the northeast of the country in possession of elephant tusks arrested. A total of 78 elephants in 2012 and 30 in 2013 elephants in the northeast slaughtered for their ivory. Namibia also in February in London International Convention on the illegal wildlife trade sign.

    The spokesperson of the Namibian police commissioner. Edwin Kanguatjivi show the 14 horns of various sizes and a leopard yesterday morning in two bags on Hosea Kutako International Airport in possession of three Chinese men were found.

    renoster1112403.jpg renoster2112403.jpg


    Francoise Steyn Photo Store
    Ten horns of various sizes in this bag hidden between women's clothes. In another bag, four horns and a leopard found. Francoise Steyn Photo Store
    Source URL: Drie Chinese met renosterhorings op lughawe betrap | Republikein.com.na
     
  2. bluey

    bluey GOLD SUPPORTER AH Legend

    Joined:
    May 21, 2012
    Messages:
    2,511
    Likes Received:
    102
    Location:
    38.12.23south 149.50.37 east
    My Photos:
    29
    Member of:
    ssaa, aba ,bairnsdale field archers
    Hunted:
    australia south africa (limpopo, north west,eastcape) canada (b.c)
    hope they get their horns cut off , and made an example of !!!!!!:vomit:
     
  3. DOC-404

    DOC-404 AH Elite

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2011
    Messages:
    1,149
    Likes Received:
    36
    My Photos:
    57
    Hunted:
    South Africa, Namibia, Angola, Botswana, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Mozambique and Poachers.
    ..horrible little slimy runt bastards are all over the place here now.. our dogs and cats aren't safe either.. :redhot:
     
  4. bluey

    bluey GOLD SUPPORTER AH Legend

    Joined:
    May 21, 2012
    Messages:
    2,511
    Likes Received:
    102
    Location:
    38.12.23south 149.50.37 east
    My Photos:
    29
    Member of:
    ssaa, aba ,bairnsdale field archers
    Hunted:
    australia south africa (limpopo, north west,eastcape) canada (b.c)
    im of the understanding that most all ,poached rhino horn ends up in china .
    but regardless of these scumbags origin they should be executed .
    send a message to all wanna bes ..............
    caught red handed like that ,
     
  5. matt85

    matt85 BRONZE SUPPORTER AH Fanatic

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2014
    Messages:
    545
    Likes Received:
    34
    Location:
    WA, USA
    bury em up to there necks in an ant hill and do some time lapse photography. if you make these videos public, people will think VERY hard before trying this kinda crap again.

    -matt
     
  6. Code4

    Code4 AH Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2009
    Messages:
    453
    Likes Received:
    9
    My Photos:
    44
    Member of:
    SSAA
    Hunted:
    Australia, Zimbabwe, RSA, NZ, UK.
    Most Rhino horn used to end up in Yemen for traditional dagger handles. Is that not still the case ? or is it politically incorrect to to say so ?
     
  7. BRICKBURN

    BRICKBURN SUPER MODERATOR CONTRIBUTOR GOLD BENEFACTOR AH Ambassador

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2010
    Messages:
    6,999
    Likes Received:
    145
    My Photos:
    396
    Member of:
    KZN Hunters Assoc
    Hunted:
    Namibia, South Africa, Botswana, Canada, USA, Mexico
    My bet is a whole lot more is now being ground up into powder concoctions.


    Did you notice the Leopard skin is finished. Which taxidermy sold that to them?

    I am glad that the airport is using X-ray machines. Catch some more.
     
  8. Deerpath

    Deerpath New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2014
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    Member of:
    BASC, GWCT
    They should be shot 'while trying to escape'.
    In front of their family.
     
  9. AfricaHunting.com

    AfricaHunting.com FOUNDER AH Ambassador

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2007
    Messages:
    5,113
    Likes Received:
    39
    Location:
    USA
    My Photos:
    4887
    No bail for Chinese rhino horn suspects

    The three Chinese nationals who were arrested at the Hosea Kutako National Airport for trying to smuggle 14 rhino horns out of the country have been refused bail. The Chinese men appeared in the Windhoek Magistrate's Court just before 17:00 on Tuesday. One of the men claimed that he had nothing to do with the crime and should be allowed out on bail. Li Xiaoliang, Li Zhibing and Pu Xuexin are charged with the possession and export of controlled wildlife products.

    The three were caught at the Hosea Kutako Airport on Monday morning with 14 rhino horns and a leopard skin in their luggage. They were on their way to Hong Kong via Johannesburg. They had left China on March 9 and arrived in Zambia the following day. They then entered Namibia through the Wenela border post on March 12 on tourist visas. When their bags were scanned at the airport the Namibian aviation police detected that two of the suitcases contained prohibited items. State prosecutor Verinao Kamahene opposed bail due to the seriousness of the offence, adding that the value of the items involved is close to N$2 million.

    He said that the three men are foreign nationals and that the possibility of absconding is therefore high. According to Kamahene it would not be in the interests of justice for the three accused to be granted bail. He said that the incident has drawn a lot of media and public attention. Magistrate Jermaine Muchali transferred the case to the Hosea Kutako periodical court and postponed it until April 2 this year. He refused bail, but reminded the accused that they can formally apply for a bail hearing. All three men opted to get private lawyers and will remain in custody until that time. Pu denied that he was involved in the crime. "I did not carry any of the stuff," he said when bail was denied. The magistrate told him that it is still the early stages of the investigation. "We cannot make any decision now and investigations have not been completed. You are an accused and you need to appear in court." The interpreter in the case was Nghiyolwa Jackson. A list of questions sent to the Ministry of Environment and Tourism by Namibian Sun about the smuggling of the rhino horns, if there were any recent poaching incidents in Namibia, where the rhino horns may originate from, what the value is, the poaching crisis in Africa, Namibia being used as a point of smuggling and improvement of policing activities in the country were rejected.



    Source: Namibian Sun
     

    Attached Files:

Share This Page