Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 72

Question about the "muzzle brakes"

This is a discussion on Question about the "muzzle brakes" within the Firearms & Ammunition forums, part of the HUNTING EQUIPMENT, FIREARMS & AMMUNITION category; Originally Posted by uplander01 Interesting responses and opinions had by all here in regard to this subject or muzzle brakes. ...

  1. #21
    sestoppelman's Avatar
    sestoppelman is online now SILVER SUPPORTER
    Joined
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    2,197

    Member of NRA, NA Hunt Club

    Hunted Tanzania, Botswana, Zimbabwe (2), Namibia, South Africa

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by uplander01 View Post
    Interesting responses and opinions had by all here in regard to this subject or muzzle brakes. I'm sure many of you have more african hunting experience than myself, I have only been on 2 african safaris, one in Namibia and the other in Mozambique for dangerous game. I have however hunted extensively throughout North America and have used rifles with and without brakes. That being said I have 17 years of experience in the american firearms industry working with many different rifle manufacturers and optics companies, (both american and german). From this experience I have gained a pretty strong opinion that one good case for a muzzle brake is that heavy recoil creates an opportunity for optics to fail. If you think because you have a $2000 german piece of glass on top of your prized 375, 416, or 458 that you don't have to worry about your scopes erectors falling apart, you are wrong. I agree that muzzle brakes are "loud", but the fact is they provide a shooter some very real advantages from a equipment reliability and shot to shot recovery and accuracy standpoint. There is a reason why combat rifles across the world have some sort of "flash hider or muzzle brake" on the end of the barrel. After hunting buff in the swamps of Mozambique, I'm convinced that's as close to combat as I'll ever get. I think the use of a brake is completely individual preference, rifles are loud no matter what, especially if the wind is in your face like it should be, coupled with the fact that everyone should more or less be behind you when you're shooting. The following is just my 2 cents on the subject:

    1. Lightweight "magnum rifles" with thin pipes shoot a lot better with a brake on the end of the barrel, whether it be because it allows the shooter to "handle the recoil", or just not flinch and follow through correctly....both are important
    2. The above mentioned rifles without a break will make you develop a flinch a lot faster than a 11lb 416.
    3. My 10.5 lb scoped 458 Lott has a brake on there and I'm thankful for it. It was built by one of the most well known custom firearms manufacturers in the US for his own personal use, I assume he new what he was doing. I can shoot it really well, (scoped or unscoped), operate it quickly to get back on target for a second shot a lot faster with the brake. For that reason I use this 458 with the brake on it when on safari.
    4. Repeated heavy recoil will break any optics erectors over time, quicker on some than others.
    5. Where there is a big bore and a giant powder hungry rifle cartridge, there will be a guy claiming he can shoot it effectively, but fact is most guys can't in a repeatable fashion.


    I have spent a lot of time training retail salespeople in the US how to handle and shoot firearms, I'm sure that the guys on this site have a lot more experience afield than most of them. But honestly, many of you fellas that are using words like "sissy" and "wuss" are probably not handling that recoil as well as you think, sorry to damage your ego. When I reached the age of 40, I wasn't willing to stand there and take that punishment like I was when I was 25, whether it be the aging shoulder injuries from a decade of football, or just the wisdom that you don't have to endure that sort of thing to get the objective accomplished....which is a clean precise one shot kill.

    While I respect any PH's opinion that a "muzzle brake" is not classic or traditional, (and I agree), I personally show up knowing my equipment and why it's set up the way it is, and that I know how to use it....which will translate to a much better hunt for everyone in the long run, especially if any of the big uglies are on the menu. For those of you that think putting a couple of boxes of shells through your big bore rifle prepares you for the opportunity of a lifetime on a trophy animal or even worse renting a rifle you are not familiar with, I disagree. Let me know how your shoulder and brain feel after putting 300-400 rounds through that big bore without a brake.

    My commentary is not intended to be argumentative, I would hope that all of this communities members opinions are accepted gracefully as just that "opinions". And to the less experienced hunters looking for information, to some degree valuable.
    All good points in favor of brakes. At least you acknowledge the noise increase. Regardless the good points however, you wont see me in hunting camp with one.

  2. #22
    gi jane's Avatar
    gi jane is offline BRONZE SUPPORTER
    Joined
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    470
    gi jane has no Articles
    View gi jane's Photos

    Default

    Let me just say how much I appreciate all of the input regarding my original thread. One thing that is really bothering me however is that I spelled "(Breaks) Brakes" wrong. Sorry for that fellow AH members. It makes me cringe every time I read the heading to my post. In retrospect, I was militant regarding my PH and trackers hearing protection, regardless of the situation. I refused to take the shot unless they all were prepared for it.

  3. #23
    BRICKBURN's Avatar
    BRICKBURN is online now SUPER MODERATOR
    Joined
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    6,278

    Member of KZN Hunters Assoc

    Hunted Namibia (Otavi, Ozondjache) South Africa ( LP, KZN, NC, EC) Botswana (Ghanzi) Canada (BC, AB, SK, MB, Ont, PQ, NS) USA (MT, WA, SD, CA, CO, WY, KS, MN, NC, VG, UT, HI)

    BRICKBURN has no Articles
    View BRICKBURN's Photos

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by gi jane View Post
    Let me just say how much I appreciate all of the input regarding my original thread. One thing that is really bothering me however is that I spelled "(Breaks) Brakes" wrong. Sorry for that fellow AH members. It makes me cringe every time I read the heading to my post. In retrospect, I was militant regarding my PH and trackers hearing protection, regardless of the situation. I refused to take the shot unless they all were prepared for it.
    Can't think of you cringing.

    The staff's ears thank you.
    Practice whispering before you leave for Africa!
    A Legend in my own mind!

  4. #24
    Royal27's Avatar
    Royal27 is offline BRONZE SUPPORTER
    Joined
    May 2012
    Posts
    363

    Member of DSC, NRA

    Hunted USA - TX, CO, GA, Zim (soon), SA (after Zim!)

    Royal27 has no Articles
    View Royal27's Photos

    Default

    So I had a brake put on my .375 H&H. The reason I did this is so that I can shoot it as much as I want too. Heck, my .30/06 is worse for felt recoil than the H&H with the brake. It ups the amount of shooting I do without any pain considerably. I DO NOT want to develop a flinch. I've done it before and struggled getting out of the habit.

    All that said, the brake I had put on also has a thread cover if I don't want the brake on. Heavy day at range = brake. Hunting or a box of shells while practicing off of sticks = no brake.

    It so the best of both worlds, IMO.

  5. #25
    spike.t's Avatar
    spike.t is online now AH Legend
    Joined
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    2,559

    Member of sci int, basc

    Hunted zambia, tanzania, zimbabwe, hungary, france, england

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by gi jane View Post
    Let me just say how much I appreciate all of the input regarding my original thread. One thing that is really bothering me however is that I spelled "(Breaks) Brakes" wrong. Sorry for that fellow AH members. It makes me cringe every time I read the heading to my post. In retrospect, I was militant regarding my PH and trackers hearing protection, regardless of the situation. I refused to take the shot unless they all were prepared for it.
    jane i just thought you were spelling in american, as opposed to expressing yourself in the Queens english......

  6. #26
    uplander01 is offline New Member
    Joined
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    9

    Hunted Namibia, Mozambique, Canada, USA

    uplander01 has no Articles
    uplander01 has no Photos

    Default

    In regard to the scopes comment, I am sure manufacturers do extensive testing, however you can see the evolution in them trying to solidify the erector system. I have had best luck with Schmidt and Bender, they just seem to hold up. I have never used a Swaro but the current rep tells me that the new dual coil spring system they are using in the Z6 is supposedly rock solid. So to clarify, all of these companies are working toward a more solid erector platform....it's like the dirty little secret none of them talk about, but I can assure you I have been in sales meetings and heard commentary from upper level folks from a well known german optics company that would make you want to go re-check your zero.

    And for sure fellas, know one is going to shoot 3-400 rounds out of a big bore at a time, but one surely should in the 6 months or so leading up to safari. I agree with the comments on noise, there is no doubt brakes create a lot more noise in the whole general area. However, for me, that disadvantage does not out weigh the advantages.

    Cheers guys-

  7. #27
    bluey's Avatar
    bluey is online now GOLD SUPPORTER
    Joined
    May 2012
    Posts
    1,998

    Member of ssaa, aba ,bairnsdale field archers

    Hunted australia south africa (limpopo) canada (b.c)

    bluey has no Articles
    View bluey's Photos

    Default

    l have brakes on my 30.06, 300 wm, 300 rum . my wife is thinking of getting one on her 7 mm.
    l love em . I don't let anyone stand right beside me or foreward of the firarm while im shooting . and l seen a mate crack his wind screen shooting the 300 across the bonnet of his ute.
    l rekon the recoil is cut by 30 to 40% on each of my guns .
    as for louder , bloody oath ses its gotta be that 30 or 40% louder .
    if im shooting with some one that carrys on to much about it l just unscrew it and cap it .
    if im hunting with some one that don't like em l tell them to stalk the opposite direction .
    im comfortable with the noise from behind the gun , and reduced recoil boost my confidence taking a longer shot of the shoulder at a departing samba .as atleast half the shots ,when stalking samba are off the shoulder .or the freezer wouldnot look so healthy .
    for what its worth l email the out fitter me and little lady are hunting with in july and asked him what his opinion is of the brakes , I will let youse know when he replies .
    but l don't think your cheating, using them one little bit janey ,,its like using binos ,mate .,

  8. #28
    DOC-404's Avatar
    DOC-404 is online now AH Elite
    Joined
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    1,109

    Hunted South Africa, Namibia, Angola, Botswana, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Mozambique and Poachers.

    DOC-404 has no Articles
    View DOC-404's Photos

    Default

    BIG bores are for dangerous game. It is very rare to see scopes on true 40+ caliber big bores, but as the eyes become older, a scope or reflex sight is sometimes a necessity and I would recommend one of these, which I believe is the very best DG scope on the market today.

    1-4X24 NXS Compact Riflescope | Nightforce Optics, Inc.

    Again, hunting DG in thick bush can become a highly dangerous situation in an instant and hearing is key to survival. I have the t-shirt, cap and scars to prove it. There will never be a muzzle-braked big bore in any DG hunt that I am involved in.

  9. #29
    Big5 is offline AH Enthusiast
    Joined
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    355

    Member of SCI Life member, NRA Life/Benefactor member

    Hunted USA, Canada, Mexico, Zimbabwe, Botswana, Namibia, South Africa, Spain, Russia

    Big5 has no Articles
    Big5 has no Photos

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Diamondhitch View Post
    . . . . anyone who has been subjected to an eardrum blowing muzzle brake needs no special equipment to form an accurate opinion of them.
    Quote Originally Posted by DOC-404 View Post
    . . . .When in the bush, and eyes and ears are all working overtime, it is not always possible to prepare hearing protection for snap shots. You will never see hearing protection used in thick bush when following up on wounded DG. They are seriously frowned upon by most PH's..
    Quote Originally Posted by spike.t View Post
    . . . . they are very nasty when you are standing anywhere to the side and a ways back as well. as has been said when hunting and a fast shot has to be taken and the ph is trying to get the client onto the correct target, or most probably getting him to see it in the first place, there is no concious thought to stick your fingers in your ears for when the shot goes off, all concentration is on the animal, and the ph and maybe a tracker will be standing at your shoulders and when that rifle goes off then its very very unpleasant. its not too great even with a finger stuck in your ear. . . . nobody is going to put 3 to 400rds through a big bore at one time anyway ,its going to be 15 or whatever they are happy with at a time, and if the person doesnt like/cant handle that calibre then move down to something they can. . . . and even if the wind is in your face i promise you the noise aint anywhere as bad as as muzzlebrake. p.s. i am not being argumentative.
    Quote Originally Posted by sestoppelman View Post
    . . . . Regardless the good points however, you wont see me in hunting camp with one.

    I agree with all of the above. I cannot tolerate the eardrum shattering noise generated by a muzzle brake. They can also create a problem in many real life hunting situations . . . just my two cents.
    There is only one degree of dead . . . there are many degrees of wounded

  10. #30
    bluey's Avatar
    bluey is online now GOLD SUPPORTER
    Joined
    May 2012
    Posts
    1,998

    Member of ssaa, aba ,bairnsdale field archers

    Hunted australia south africa (limpopo) canada (b.c)

    bluey has no Articles
    View bluey's Photos

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bluey View Post
    l have brakes on my 30.06, 300 wm, 300 rum . my wife is thinking of getting one on her 7 mm.
    l love em . I don't let anyone stand right beside me or foreward of the firarm while im shooting . and l seen a mate crack his wind screen shooting the 300 across the bonnet of his ute.
    l rekon the recoil is cut by 30 to 40% on each of my guns .
    as for louder , bloody oath ses its gotta be that 30 or 40% louder .
    if im shooting with some one that carrys on to much about it l just unscrew it and cap it .
    if im hunting with some one that don't like em l tell them to stalk the opposite direction .
    im comfortable with the noise from behind the gun , and reduced recoil boost my confidence taking a longer shot of the shoulder at a departing samba .as atleast half the shots ,when stalking samba are off the shoulder .or the freezer wouldnot look so healthy .
    for what its worth l email the out fitter me and little lady are hunting with in july and asked him what his opinion is of the brakes , I will let youse know when he replies .
    but l don't think your cheating, using them one little bit janey ,,its like using binos ,mate .,
    this is a part of the reply I got from roy wormald from wormaldhunting adventures

    Muzzel brakes are great on magnums they deffinatley cut back on recoil and fellows tend to shoot better , I like them for this reason , however they are hell on hearing so make sure you are always behind the muzzel. I have two rifles with muzzel breaks and use them consistantley.

  11. #31
    Big5 is offline AH Enthusiast
    Joined
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    355

    Member of SCI Life member, NRA Life/Benefactor member

    Hunted USA, Canada, Mexico, Zimbabwe, Botswana, Namibia, South Africa, Spain, Russia

    Big5 has no Articles
    Big5 has no Photos

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bluey View Post
    this is a part of the reply I got from roy wormald from wormaldhunting adventures

    Muzzel brakes are great on magnums they deffinatley cut back on recoil and fellows tend to shoot better , I like them for this reason , however they are hell on hearing so make sure you are always behind the muzzel. I have two rifles with muzzel breaks and use them consistantley.

    Sport hunters, outfitters, hunting guides and PH's will all have an opinion on muzzle brakes and those opinions will vary. But as they say; opinions are like anal orifices in that everyone seems to have one. I'm therefore certain that for every hunting guide or PH that can be found who supports the use of a muzzle brake you will surely find one or more who will oppose them. It's easy to find people on both sides of the muzzle brake fence.

    Personally, I don't like muzzle brakes and I would not consider using one. I've also never been on a hunt where I encountered a hunting guide or PH who used a muzzle brake on his own rifle, or one who supported their use in the field. That's just my own opinion and my personal experience. Opinions and experiences will always vary. To each his own.

    In any event, you like muzzle brakes and you'll be hunting with a PH who also likes them. I guess that's a good thing.

    Good hunting to you!
    There is only one degree of dead . . . there are many degrees of wounded

  12. #32
    buffybr's Avatar
    buffybr is online now AH Veteran
    Joined
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    157

    Member of SCI, RMEF, Life member NRA and Manhatten (Montana) Wildlife Association

    Hunted USA(CO,MT,WY,AK,TX), Canada(NWT), Zim(Matetsi), RSA(Limpopo,KZN,Free State,Eastern Cape)

    buffybr has no Articles
    View buffybr's Photos

    Default

    Muzzle brakes. Here we go again. It seems folks either love them or hate them. Yes they do significantly reduce felt recoil -- the military has known this for many years, and yes a braked gun is louder than an un-braked gun.

    As was mentioned earlier, brakes (or porting) work because they divert some of the expanding gasses out through holes near the muzzle of the gun, which create a mini "rocket effect" out of each hole, and they reduce the amount of gasses exiting from the muzzle of the gun. The shape, size, number, and position of these holes will vary depending on the desired effect of the holes. Some holes are small, some are large. Some holes are round, some are slotted. They all do the same thing: they divert some of the gasses out the sides of the barrel. The military discovered long ago that the tremendous recoil generated in their cannons could be reduced by putting a "brake", a collar with large holes in the sides, near the muzzles of these guns. They later called these muzzle brakes "flash suppressors" and put them on their small arms such as the M-14s and M-16s. The gasses don't care what we call the holes, they just do through the holes which reduces the total amount of gas exiting the muzzle which, among other things, reduces recoil.

    Sound waves are circular waves of pressure emitting from their source. Much like the waves in still water when something disturbs the surface of the water. As the sound waves travel farther from their source, their volume decreases. With an unbraked gun, the circular sound wave leaves the end of the muzzle and the majority of the sound is projected directly away from the gun. By the time the circular sound wave bends back to the shooter, it has lost much of it's energy and volume. It is just like standing behind someone who is talking vs. standing directly in front of them.

    With a gun with a muzzle brake, the sound wave emits from the holes on the sides of the barrel, which is pointed directly at someone standing to the side of the gun. The noise is also louder for the shooter because the sound waves are stronger on the side of the circle than they are at the back of the circle that is moving directly away from the shooter.

    Someone posted earlier that "the shooter using a muzzle break is shielded from the direct report of the muzzle blast." I can't visualize where this shield is, unless he was referring to what I described in the paragraph above.

    With or without a brake, large capacity cartridges are louder than smaller ones, because they burn more powder. With the same bullets and fired in the same gun, my .357 magnum cartridges are louder than my .38 special cartridges. My .300 Weatherby burns roughly twice as much powder than a .308 Win. Shooting any firearm or being near someone who is shooting is damaging to hearing and all should be using some kind of ear protection. There are several types of hearing protectors on the market today that will actually enhance low volume sounds and at the same time block the dangerous high volume sounds, so the argument that a PH can't wear hearing protection because he must be able to hear the slightest sounds in the brush when hunting dangerous game doesn't hold a lot of water.

  13. #33
    sestoppelman's Avatar
    sestoppelman is online now SILVER SUPPORTER
    Joined
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    2,197

    Member of NRA, NA Hunt Club

    Hunted Tanzania, Botswana, Zimbabwe (2), Namibia, South Africa

    Default

    I have never heard anyone equate a flash suppressor to a muzzle brake in any way. I have 2 AR15's. One has a std mil type flash suppressor, the other has what Armalite calls a 'muzzle check'. its a brake. The difference in increased noise and lessened recoil is dramatic in the 'checked' Armalite. I dont think we can mix the two and say they are the same thing. Now some have said and I have no reason to not believe them, that a noise suppressor as used on some rifles, actually reduces felt recoil as well, but thats a different animal than a brake or a flash suppressor. I dont think anybody doubts the efficacy of a good brake, just that many if not most find the increased blast and noise objectionable. I sure do. BTW, my Armalite was bought during the Clinton ban so I had no choice in buying it. I could have it removed now, but the dang thing shoots so well with it on, I hate to mess with it, less I change the dynamics and screw it up. My one and only 'braked' rifle.

  14. #34
    DOC-404's Avatar
    DOC-404 is online now AH Elite
    Joined
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    1,109

    Hunted South Africa, Namibia, Angola, Botswana, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Mozambique and Poachers.

    DOC-404 has no Articles
    View DOC-404's Photos

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by buffybr View Post
    There are several types of hearing protectors on the market today that will actually enhance low volume sounds and at the same time block the dangerous high volume sounds, so the argument that a PH can't wear hearing protection because he must be able to hear the slightest sounds in the brush when hunting dangerous game doesn't hold a lot of water.
    ..well, I guess that settles that. But, then there's me, who, having been in the bush since the early sixties, long before all these fancy gadgets were even thought of, prefers not to risk his life on something that can fail, go flat, break, get wet, fall off, fall out, get dust in or get lost while searching for, or running from, a wounded lion, leopard or buffalo. I guess the water stays with whoever is prepared to carry the bucket..

  15. #35
    bluey's Avatar
    bluey is online now GOLD SUPPORTER
    Joined
    May 2012
    Posts
    1,998

    Member of ssaa, aba ,bairnsdale field archers

    Hunted australia south africa (limpopo) canada (b.c)

    bluey has no Articles
    View bluey's Photos

    Default

    ha ha ha , you really don't like them noisy bloody things do ya

  16. #36
    Upton O. Good's Avatar
    Upton O. Good is offline AH Veteran
    Joined
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    188

    Member of NRA Life member, Nature Conservancy, Dallas Safari Club

    Hunted Zimbabwe, South Africa, Canada, Mexico, Louisiana

    Upton O. Good has no Articles
    View Upton O. Good's Photos

    Default

    I had a bit of "recoil anxiety" when I was preparing for my first trip to Africa. I was primarily a bird hunter who shot a 20 ga because of my flinching with 12 ga loads. So, in prepping for my trip, I went to the rifle range with a 30.06 and set up in my assign position. I had never been around a large rifle caliber with a muzzle brake and it didn't occur to me to check the guy's rifle in the shooting lane to my left. When he let loose on his braked .300 min mag the first time, the muzzle blast wave was like getting slapped on the side of the face and the noise was incredibly loud even though I was wearing ear muff type protection.

    I decided that I would never expose anyone in my hunting group (Ph and tracker) to anything like a muzzle brake. We're a team and it isn't just about me, their well being depends on my shooting well and them having functional hearing at the end of the day. I shot poorly on my first trip to SA, very well on my second trip to SA and good enough on my trip to Zimbabwe when I had moved up to a .375 which I had practiced with for three months prior to the hunt.

  17. #37
    uplander01 is offline New Member
    Joined
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    9

    Hunted Namibia, Mozambique, Canada, USA

    uplander01 has no Articles
    uplander01 has no Photos

    Default

    Well stated explanantion of the sound wave portion of a muzzle blast.

    There are plenty of hearing protection options out there that don't block low sounds like conversation or ambient noise, some like you mention amplify ambient noise and completely block out the loud noise like gun blast. I actually sell a line called Pro Ears, they pioneered this technology, they make electronics in three forms, behind the ear (PRO HEAR model $300-$500), inner ear with custom fitted plugs (PRO FIT model, starts at $700) and over the ear muffs, (P300 @ $230). The downside to all 3of these is that they are not cheap as you can see by my noted prices. I have used all of them and the muffs are nothing less than perfect for range use, indoor or outdoor. I'm not a big fan of the behind the ear model, but the Pro Fits if fitted correctly are an item you will own for a long time and love them. All that being said I'm guilty of not having even plugs in my shirt pocket most of the time on a hunt. It's interesting that you post this about hearing protection though, after last weeks threads on this subject I wanted to use myself for a trial with another type of plug that is cheap and lets in ambient noise but blocks loud gun blasts, the Surefire Sonic Defenders.

    I proceeded to the range and put these things in my ears...(I use them all the time during shotgun training on the trap, skeet, and sporting clays fields). I was interested to see how they worked with something like a 458 lott with a muzzle brake on the end of the barrel. They were completely adequate. I then handed the gun over to my step son and I stood behind and over to the side, again work like advertised. The db rating is 24 so I'm sure that if a sound is super loud it might not take it down to completely safe levels...for example if a sound starts at 160 db and is reduced via hearing protection by 24db, you are still close to a level that is not good for you which I think is at 140db....I'm sure there is someone out there that knows this exact info...might even by somewhere in this thread or another one on muzzle brakes in this forum.

    All this being said, you can hear pretty normal with them in your ear, however, you do lose a little ability to hear really low sounds..they kind of lesson the sharpeness with which we hear regular noises. They would be great for most hunting applications (they are not recommended for indoor use), however, I wouldn't wear them following up in the thick stuff after dangerous game where hearing becomes as crucial as sight......any of the electronics on the other hand actually give you supernatural hearing with absolute silencing of loud noises that is hard to explain until you experience it.

    But as I stated earlier, I'm guilty of not always having this type of gear on my person when I'm out on the hunt. For those of you out there that weren't aware of these hearing protection options perhaps this is useful info.

    There will never be a definitive answer to the muzzle brake in the field debate, it's about personal preference and configuring your equipment the way you need to in order to get the job done. For myself when recoil reaches above 50 ft lbs or so, I prefer using a brake irregardless of the noise, and of course it's common courtesy to make sure everyone in your crew is aware of it ahead of time. Upon my return to africa for another buffalo or two, as much as I love my classic mauser 98 375 HH that I used to take my first buff, I will be throwing 500 grains at 2250fps from my 458 lott with a brake on the end of the barrel. After a team of us hunted buff in Mozambique for 8 days, I'm convinced that you can't use too big of a rifle on those critters........maybe we can start a thread on that topic, it would be a fun one.

  18. #38
    buffybr's Avatar
    buffybr is online now AH Veteran
    Joined
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    157

    Member of SCI, RMEF, Life member NRA and Manhatten (Montana) Wildlife Association

    Hunted USA(CO,MT,WY,AK,TX), Canada(NWT), Zim(Matetsi), RSA(Limpopo,KZN,Free State,Eastern Cape)

    buffybr has no Articles
    View buffybr's Photos

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sestoppelman View Post
    I have never heard anyone equate a flash suppressor to a muzzle brake in any way... I dont think we can mix the two and say they are the same thing...
    Why not? They are both essentially a cylinder with holes cut in it's sides that is attached to the muzzle end of a barrel. The holes allow some of the expanding gasses to exit out the sides of the barrel milliseconds before the remainder of the gasses exit from the muzzle of the barrel. The area of the holes determine how much gas exits. I can see where the size or shape of the holes would effect the tone of the noise (a trumpet produces higher pitched sound than a tuba). My point was that both suppressors and brakes increase the noise of the report to the sides and rear of the muzzle, and that both suppressors and brakes reduce the felt recoil of the gun.

    Quote Originally Posted by sestoppelman View Post
    ...I dont think anybody doubts the efficacy of a good brake, just that many if not most find the increased blast and noise objectionable...
    For the past two years, I've helped out in "public sight in days" at our local range. This is a program that we do every year just before big game rifle season where we allow non members of our club to sight in their rifles, and we provide a range officer at each bench to help the public shooting there. Many times I have heard a loud report from a rifle a few benches from mine, and I'll look across a bench or two of standard bolt action .30-06s or .270s and see that the loud reports are coming from an AR with a flash suppressor.

    The loudest reports, and the one that I remember most from last year's sight in day was from a TC Contender pistol with a .30-30 barrel.

  19. #39
    sestoppelman's Avatar
    sestoppelman is online now SILVER SUPPORTER
    Joined
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    2,197

    Member of NRA, NA Hunt Club

    Hunted Tanzania, Botswana, Zimbabwe (2), Namibia, South Africa

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by buffybr View Post
    Why not? They are both essentially a cylinder with holes cut in it's sides that is attached to the muzzle end of a barrel. The holes allow some of the expanding gasses to exit out the sides of the barrel milliseconds before the remainder of the gasses exit from the muzzle of the barrel. The area of the holes determine how much gas exits. I can see where the size or shape of the holes would effect the tone of the noise (a trumpet produces higher pitched sound than a tuba). My point was that both suppressors and brakes increase the noise of the report to the sides and rear of the muzzle, and that both suppressors and brakes reduce the felt recoil of the gun.



    For the past two years, I've helped out in "public sight in days" at our local range. This is a program that we do every year just before big game rifle season where we allow non members of our club to sight in their rifles, and we provide a range officer at each bench to help the public shooting there. Many times I have heard a loud report from a rifle a few benches from mine, and I'll look across a bench or two of standard bolt action .30-06s or .270s and see that the loud reports are coming from an AR with a flash suppressor.

    The loudest reports, and the one that I remember most from last year's sight in day was from a TC Contender pistol with a .30-30 barrel.
    Well no doubt all AR's can be noisy for sure. One of the most obnoxious rifles to be around is a short barreled Mosin Nagant 7.62x54R with factory full power ball ammo, huge ball of flame and very loud report! No brake. As to your earlier points I find it hard to not agree to some extent however remember that a typical flash suppressor, as on an AR has a huge hole up front thus does not restrict gases from going forward and less gases are funneled outwards thru the various slits, holes or whatever, whereas a brake seems to be more likely to have a just larger than caliber hole for the bullet to exit from, forcing more gases out the side. I think that is where I would say they are not the same. I get your point though.

  20. #40
    spike.t's Avatar
    spike.t is online now AH Legend
    Joined
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    2,559

    Member of sci int, basc

    Hunted zambia, tanzania, zimbabwe, hungary, france, england

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sestoppelman View Post
    . One of the most obnoxious rifles to be around is a short barreled Mosin Nagant 7.62x54R with factory full power ball ammo, huge ball of flame and very loud report! .
    yup but its a very distinctive sound and looks good when it goes off.

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. The 2012 Global Rescue Story Contest - "I Lived to Tell the Tale"
    By Global Rescue in forum Before & After the Hunt
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 09-30-2012, 08:21 AM
  2. Muzzle breaks and their use
    By 505ED in forum Firearms & Ammunition
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 09-20-2010, 02:18 PM
  3. How much "hunting" do you do on a "typical" hunt?
    By Cossack in forum Hunting Africa
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 09-17-2010, 02:51 AM
  4. Federal Brass: "FC" v "FC 07" v "FC 08"
    By browningbbr in forum Reloading
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 08-03-2009, 10:48 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •